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Displaying items by tag: Baltimore

Baltimore Inshore lIfeboat was called into service twice on Saturday to assist vessels in distress in poor weather conditions. A yacht dragging its anchor in Church Strand called for assistance while winds were freshening to force 7 from the southwest with heavy rain and poor visibility. The alarm was raised at 20:15 on Saturday. Helmsman John Kearney and crew Micheal Cottrell and Ronan Calnan provided assistance to the lone yachtsman, helped to secure the vessel and escorted her back to Baltimore Harbour.

Later at 22:40 the inshore lifeboat was again called out to give assistance to a RIB that had gone aground on a rocky shore following engine failure. There was one man and two children on board at the time. The inshore lifeboat was launched again under the direction of Helmsman John Kearney and crew Paul O'Driscoll and Tadhg Collins. Again the lifeboat was able to secure the safety of the vessel and passengers.

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Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Baltimore RNLI inshore lifeboat Bessie, was launched this morning to assist a yacht that had gone aground at an area called the Sound, North West of Baltimore Harbour. The alarm was raised at 11:52am when the 36ft Sun Odyssey yacht was seen aground across the Harbour. Helmsman Youen Jacob with his crew of Kieran Collins and John McDonagh made their way to the stricken vessel on an RNLI twin engine Atlantic 75 RIB. On arrival at the scene they found the crew hauling on their anchor line in an attempt to pull themselves off the rocks. The inshore lifeboat gave assistance by creating a wash which lifted the boat from its rocky perch. The lifeboat then escorted the yacht back to Baltimore Harbour. The yacht did not suffer any significant damage and all four passengers on board, two men and two women were uninjured.

Related Safety posts

RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


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Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Tagged under
21st June 2010

Man Found Safe and Well

The man whom had been thought missing near Baltimore in West Cork has been located safe and well. All rescue services have been stood down. It is a reminder of the importance of letting people know where you are and where you are going.


Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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The RNLI Inshore Lifeboat Bessie was called to assist in a search for a man who failed to make a pre-arranged meeting with a friend in Baltimore yesterday. The man had been camping on the Islands of Roaring Water Bay, and had left his Jeep in Baltimore. When the alert was raised at 20:18, it was unclear where the man might have been intending to stay that night. A search was initiated by Helmsman John Kearney and crewmen Micheal Cottrell and Paul O’Driscoll extending from Barlogue Creek at the mouth of Lough Hyne and into Roaring Water Bay. The Schull inshore lifeboat and the Coast guard helicopter were also involved in the search. The search was stood down last night as darkness fell and recommenced this morning at 05:15 with Helmsman Kieran Collins and crewmen Ronan Sheehy and Jim Baker on board the RNLI inshore lifeboat Bessie.



Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Both the all-weather lifeboat and inshore lifeboat based in Baltimore Harbour were called to give assistance on Saturday evening 19th June.

The inshore lifeboat Bessie was called at 18:45 to standby a 58ft motor yacht that was disabled and adrift in Glandore Harbour having hit a rock. Helmsman Youen Jacob assisted by crewmen Kieran Collins and Diarmuid Collins stoody by alongside the Courtmacsherry lifeboat as the motor yacht was towed to safety in Union Hall.

The inshore lifeboat has just been returned to its compound on the pier, when a second alert was raised at 22.25. This time the all-weather lifeboat Hilda Jarrett, responded to a medical emergency on Cape Clear Island. The Public Health Nurse stabilised the casualty prior to the young man being taken on board at North Harbour on Cape Clear Island.. The ambulance service met the lifeboat on its return to Baltimore to transfer the casualty to hospital. The lifeboat was returned to base at 00.10 on Sunday morning. Coxswain Kieran Cotter, was assisted by his crew of Micheal Cottrell, Don O’Donovan, Diarmuid Collins, Brian Ormond, Simon Duggan and John O’Flynn. Remarkably Baltimore lifeboats newest recruit, Diarmuid Collins, attended at  both calls.

These two incidents demonstrate the versatility of the RNLI lifeboat capacity at Baltimore. The inshore lifeboat is a twin engine Atlantic 75 RIB, purpose designed for rapid response to inshore emergencies, whilst the larger all-weather lifeboat is suited to long range calls and medical evacuations.


Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Situated on an elevated site with superb views in a popular coastal base. The Baltimore Harbour hotel in Co. Cork is for sale by private treaty. The site includes hotel suites, 6 town houses and 12 self contianed apartments. More details from Contact CB Richard Ellis, 01-618 5500 or DTZ Sherry FitzGerald, 01-639 9300.

Published in Waterfront Property
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Page 19 of 19

Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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