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Displaying items by tag: Drogheda Port

Drogheda Port has announced its Annual Arts Commission for 2021 has been awarded to Drogheda born figurative sculptor, Ms Sallyanne Morgan.

Submissions were invited from local artists for an art piece from any art discipline based on a maritime or port-related theme.

Now based in Bettystown, Sallyanne has spent many years abroad, living and working in countries such as Cambodia and more recently Malta. She has worked as a community artist in the NGO 'Common Ground' and 'Respond' housing Association. She also taught ceramics to young adults in Phnom Penh and facilitated a cement workshop in Kathmandu University and had solo exhibitions in Malta and Phnom Penh. Her work currently features in two exhibitions, a joint show in the Seamus Ennis Arts Center in Naul and in The Botanic gardens, "Sculpture in Context". Sallyanne works with fibre-reinforced cement (FRC) or ferro-cement and began using this material as an alternative to clay after leaving technical college. This cement is either directly applied to the metal armature or is cast from a clay model.

For the 2021 Arts Commission, Sallyanne's objective is to capture the human element, and so the sculpture she proposes is a small homage to all the unknown men who spent their working lives lifting and carrying and making the Port function.

'There was a huge response to this year's Commission, with a wide range of excellent submissions making the awarding a difficult choice for the Port. However, in the end, we feel Sallyanne's proposal will make a wonderful contribution to our growing collection. We would like to thank all artists who responded to the invitation, and we look forward to future submissions from these artists.' said Nessa Lally of Drogheda Port Company.

Sallyanne is delighted that the Drogheda Port Company has commissioned one of her sculptures for their collection and she expects to complete the commission by the end of this year.

Published in Drogheda Port
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Drogheda Port Company are inviting applications for the position of Harbour Master for the Port of Drogheda.

Drogheda Port is the largest commercial regional port in Ireland, handling over 1.5 million tonnes of cargo per annum and over 1000 ship movements.

The Co. Louth port is projecting significant future growth and is embarking on ambitious development plans over the next number of years which will see substantial investment in the port’s infrastructure, handling capacity, technology, and safety systems.

The position of Harbour Master is key to the safe and efficient management of the Port, he\she is a member of the Executive Management Team, reporting to the Chief Executive.

The Harbour Master’s primary operational responsibilities are to ensure the Port’s marine, cargo and estate management activities operate safely and efficiently.

The role requires an in-depth understanding of ship manoeuvering principles over a wide range of vessel types/class within a confined tidal waterway.

Further details can be obtained by emailing: [email protected]

Published in Jobs

Drogheda Port Company is getting ready for Brexit. As one of Ireland's leading break bulk ports, Drogheda is announcing two new breakbulk shortsea services as part of a solution for importers and exporters concerned with the impacts of Brexit.

In partnership with Fast Lines Belgium, a new service has already commenced "BEL - EIRE LINES". Bel-Eire Lines is a conventional breakbulk Liner Service connecting the port of Antwerp to the port of Drogheda, shipping goods from an EU port to an EU port. The service will reroute the cargo flows of existing and new customers shipping directly in or out of Ireland avoiding the UK.

The service caters for:

  • all types of breakbulk such as steel products, bagged material, palletized goods
  • cargoes currently trucked via UK land-bridge to Ireland
  • smaller lots difficult to ship as full and complete cargoes
  • project cargo
  • trans-shipment cargo

The service is operated with Fast Lines Belgium's box-shaped short-sea vessel fleet.

A second new service will commence in December linking the port of Nogaro in Italy with the port of Drogheda. This service will also offer a full suite break bulk service linking into the central European rail network.

Mr Paul Fleming Port CEO said, "We are delighted to welcome these new services which will strengthen the strategic importance of Drogheda Port in supporting the Irish Construction Sector and provide a seamless supply chain from Europe to Ireland in a post Brexit trading environment."

Mr Simon Mulvany MD Fast Lines Ireland said "We are always looking for new growth opportunities and as experts in shipping goods in and out of Ireland to the continent these new services will form part of Irelands solution for Brexit. We will be providing an opportunity for existing and new customers to reroute their cargo flows in or out of Ireland."

Published in Drogheda Port
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Salvors successfully offloaded the last recoverable cargo from the grounded MV Kaami in western Scotland last Thursday, 30 April.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the MV Kaami ran aground in the Minch between Skye and Lewis on 21 March, just days after leaving Drogheda Port en route for Sweden.

The MV Kaami’s eight Russian crew were rescued within hours of the incident, but the 90m cargo vessel remains at the spot known locally as Eugenie Rock.

Work began last month to remove cargo from the vessel, and divers were able to access the hold to assess any internal damage.

Weather conditions during the early part of last week made it unsafe for the salvors to board the vessel and slowed down the salvage operation.

But more settled weather on Thursday allowed for some 30 tonnes of cargo to be removed and transferred to a landing craft for disposal.

The focus of the salvage operation is now on completing repairs to make the vessel watertight and to allow for it to be refloated.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Work continues at pace to remove cargo from the MV Kaami which ran aground off Skye in western Scotland after sailing from Drogheda Port last month.

A further 22 skips of cargo were removed yesterday (Monday 20 April), meaning a total of 160 skips worth of cargo have now been taken ashore.

Divers have also now been able to access the hold of the vessel to begin internal damage assessment.

The ship remains aground in the Minch between Skye and Lewis.

Stephan Hennig, the Secretary of State’s Representative for Maritime Salvage and Intervention, said: “Thanks to good weather and sea conditions, progress is being made swiftly.

“The removal of so much cargo now means we’re getting closer to the next phase of the salvage which will focus on assessing the internal damage and attempting to temporarily repair damaged sections of the ship.”

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, an exclusion zone had been stablished around the Nassau-registered cargo ship after it ran aground at Eugenie Rock within days of leaving Drogheda Port on 21 March.

The vessel’s eight Russian crew were rescued from the spot some six nautical miles north-west of Duntulm on Skye.

Published in Ports & Shipping

An exclusion zone was set up around a cargo ship out of Drogheda that ran aground in Scotland’s Hebrides earlier this week, as it was battered by persisting storm conditions.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, eight crew were airlifted from the MV Kaami on Monday (23 March) after it grounded on a reef known locally as Eugenie Rock, some six nautical miles off the Isle of Skye.

The MV Kaami had left Drogheda Port less than two days previously, en route for Slite in Sweden, with a cargo of refuse-derives fuel (RDF) in pellet form.

The Press and Journal reports that a salvage team arrived on Tuesday (24 March) to inspect the abandoned vessel, while the tug Ievoli Black remained at the scene on guard.

Published in Ports & Shipping

Eight crew were rescued from a cargo ship out of Drogheda that ran aground off the Isle of Skye in Scotland’s Inner Hebrides early yesterday morning (Monday 23 March).

The MV Kaami had left Drogheda Port on the evening of Saturday 21 March and was due to arrive in Slite, Sweden this weekend.

But the 90m cargo vessel ran aground in The Minch at what’s known locally as Eugenie Rock, about six nautical miles north-west of Duntulm on Skye.

Portree RNLI’s lifeboat was launched at 2.24am yesterday morning in response to a MayDay call from the MV Kaami, as did the Emergency Towing Vessel Ievoli Black and the Pharos, a Northern Lighthouse Board buoy-laying vessel.

The duty Stornoway Coastguard rescue helicopter arrived on scene, where weather conditions has a Force 8 southerly wind with a rough sea state, and began to airlift eight of the Russian crew to Stornoway. No injuries were reported.

Published in Rescue

The “Drogheda Sail Training Bursary” was once again highlighted at the Annual Sail Training Ireland Awards Ceremony last week in the Mansion House. The CEO of Sail Training Ireland, Mr. Darragh Sheridan acknowledged the Drogheda bursary scheme as the first of its kind back in 2013, encouraging many other port towns and cities to follow suit. Fast forward seven years and there are 8 of these local bursary schemes operating throughout Ireland in association with the national charity, Sail Training Ireland.

It is true to say pre-2013 Maritime facilities for such opportunities as this in Drogheda were non-existent, so the Drogheda Port Company set out to change that through Sail Training. Since then 140 local teens have been gutsy enough to experience this influential sailing experience that often has a profoundly positive effect on their outlook on life and career choices. Some trainees have progressed to longer voyages on bigger tall ships, while others are now sitting on the Sail Training Ireland Youth Council and even pursuing maritime careers in the Navy. These developments are a testament of how much this Drogheda Sail Training youth development program has grown since its maiden voyage back in 2013.

At last week’s Awards Ceremony, local students, Erin Englishby of Colaiste na Hinse, Bettystown and Ronan Collins of St. Joseph’s C.B.S, Drogheda were both presented with the Perpetual Trophy for ‘Outstanding Trainee’ on their respective voyages in June 2019. Their vessel Captain, Mr. Peter Scallan who presented these awards, described these trainees as valuable, committed leaders who enriched the experience of all onboard. Both students are keen to continue sailing and are hopeful of upskilling on progression voyages later this year.

The continued support of the bursary sponsors is the key driver of this initiative; Irish Cement, Fast Terminals, Louth County Council and Drogheda Port Company make this possible.

Published in Drogheda Port
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Drogheda Port Company handled over 1.6 million tonnes of cargo in 2019. This is the third consecutive fiscal year in which the port has set a new cargo tonnage record. The port has been outperforming the Irish port sector in terms of year on year throughput growth for the last number of years.

The MV Nordic Diana stevedored by Fast Terminals imported a cargo of timber from Raahe in Finland on the 31st December establishing the new port record.

“2019 was marked by a robust economy coupled with strong performances in the Agri and construction sectors,” Paul Fleming Drogheda Port Chief Executive, commented. “These record volumes highlight the need for the continued development of the port and its facilities and we are currently completing a masterplan to inform the development of the port over the next 30 years which will be published later this year.” The record throughput has been achieved in a year which saw major restructuring within the port and improvements in operational efficiencies.

The port company completed a number of mergers and acquisitions positioning itself as the leading full-service port in Ireland. The outlook for 2020 continues to be strong in spite of Brexit uncertainty. As a major local employer, the company is planning a number of cargo storage projects in 2020 to increase the ports throughput capabilities as the port continues to provide a central role in facilitating Irelands open trading economy and is key in supporting a number of the regions major employers to reach their markets.

Published in Drogheda Port
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A Metocean Buoy will be towed out from Drogheda Port and deployed at the Oriel Windfarm, Outer Dundalk Bay according to the Department of Transport, Tourism & Sport. 

The duration of deployment is 1 day, and it will be carried out in the two-week period 11/10/19 to 25/10/19, subject to weather conditions.

The Survey will involve the deployment of a Floating Lidar Metocean Buoy. The Buoy is yellow in colour with a St. Andrew Cross on top.

The buoy has an area of 4 x 4 m and height of approx. 3 m above the waterline.

The buoy is equipped with a IALA yellow light, which flashes at a rate of 5 flashes every 20 seconds (Fl(5) Y 20s). The light has a range of 4 nm.

The surveys will be completed using Vessel “AMS Retriever” (callsign: MEHI8), which is a versatile multi-purpose, shallow draft tug.

Whilst transiting from Drogheda Port on the River Boyne, the “AMS Retriever” will have the Metocean Buoy secured against the stern of the vessel. When the AMS Retriever reaches open water, the buoy will be towed approximately 30 metres astern at a maximum speed of 4 kts.

During deployment of the Metocean Buoy at Oriel Windfarm the vessel will be restricted in its ability to manoeuvre.

Published in Marine Warning
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Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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