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Displaying items by tag: Dublin Port Company

#DUBLIN PORT PHOTOS - Starting today and tomorrow (Sat 6th July) is a photographic exhibition of 'Dublin Docks' which captures the daily lives of those working in the port spanning five decades (1940-1990).

The exhibition is organised by the Dublin Dockworkers Preservation Society and will be shown at the Sean O'Casey Community Centre on St Mary's Road, East Wall, in the heartland of the north inner city close to the older 'Docklands' now dominated by the financial sector.

The exhibition opens officially this evening at 7pm and besides the 40 images selected for display, visitors will be able to view a slide show that shows over 1,000 other photographs donated by dockers and their families. The images will remain on display on the Saturday too from 10am to 4pm.

Also tomorrow at 2pm in the same venue, Labour historian Francis Devine will give an illustrated talk on Dublin Dockworkers and their Trade Unions. Later in the evening at 9.30pm, musician Paul O'Brien ("Songs from the North Lotts" and "Port to Port") will perform at the Green Room Bar on Lower Sheriff Street.

There will be a further opportunity to see the exhibition during the Dublin Talls Ships Race Festival (23-26 August) as previously reported. The large collection of beautiful black and white photographs depicting the maritime history of the port through the ages will be shown in the CHQ Building at George's Dock.

Published in Dublin Port

#SOLD DUBLIN TUG SETS SAIL – With a career spanning nearly four decades, the former Dublin Port Company tug Ben Eadar (1973/198grt) departed over the weekend on her delivery voyage to serve new owners in Portuguese waters, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Prior to her departure, Ben Eadar was moored alongside the grab-hopper dredger Hebble Sand (1963/757grt) in Alexandra Basin, which too awaits her delivery voyage to new owners.

It was envisaged that the veteran tug would be towed on the delivery voyage to Portugal however she left Dublin Port for the final time on Saturday under her own power. Since her departure the 17 tonnes bollard pull (tbp) veteran vessel called en route to Milford Haven on Monday before making a longer leg across the Bay of Biscay.

She still retains her original name since her launch at the Yorkshire shipyard of Richard Dunston Ltd, Hessle, however she was re-flagged in Vanuatu, where her change of registry is Port Vila, the capital of the south Pacific island nation.

Ben Eadar became the last of three tugs sold this year to depart Dublin Port, having been brought by ARPA & Co. of Setubal in Portugal. The 17-tonnes bollard pull (tbp) tug follows her younger 35tbp Voith- Schneider fleetmates, Cluain Tarbh (1991/268grt) and Deilginis (1997/335grt). The former was sold to Scottish interests and the latter remains in Irish waters based out of Killybegs.

The trio represented the last of the older generation of a tug fleet built for the Dublin Ports & Docks Board (DP&DB) which is now the Dublin Port Company. The tugs were all given names of Dublin Bay coastal suburbs spelt in Irish and were replaced by a pair of more powerful 50tbp newbuilds introduced from 2009.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#ATLANTIC REPOSITIONING CRUISE – Another massive cruiseship the Caribbean Princess (2004/112,894grt), is to dock in Dublin Port around lunchtime today, having crossed the Atlantic, from Halifax, Nova Scotia in Canada, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 3,600 passenger capacity 'Grand' class ship operated by Princess Cruises is on a repositioning cruise voyage from North America to Europe. She is to spend the season running cruises based out of Southampton.

Caribbean Princess retains her 'Skywalkers' Nightclub mounted 15 decks at the stern, unlike her sister which called to Dublin Port last month. The structure was removed primarily on grounds of weight so to increase fuel efficiency.

The Bermuda flagged vessel is to berth at Ocean Pier in the centre of the docks which this season is to welcome a total of 90 cruiseships bringing 100,000 passengers contributing €35- €50m to the Dublin economy in 2012. It is estimated that the cruise sector has contributed over €350 million to the capital in the last decade.

Vessels such as the Caribbean Princess and larger-sized ships could be a familar sight closer to the city-centre should proposals to build a €30m dedicated cruise terminal take-off at a site adjacent to the East-Link Bridge, as part of the Dublin Port Company's Masterplan 2012-2040.

Published in Cruise Liners

#FORMER DUNDALK DREDGER  – The former Dundalk Port Company owned dredger Hebble Sand (1963/757grt) departed the dry-dock in Dublin Port last week in readiness for her new owners Abco Marine Ltd, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Last October the vessel was sold by Dublin Port Company to Abco. The marine plant company based in Hillsborough Co. Down specialises in support services in the construction, engineering and dredging projects in Northern Ireland, Scotland and the Isle of Man.

The self-propelled grab-hopper dredger currently remains berthed at Alexandra Basin in Dublin Port, awaiting her delivery voyage. Despite nearing half a century, the veteran vessel remains in excellent condition considering the rough and tumble associated with dredging.

She last sailed into Dublin Port in July last year following the transfer of the Dundalk Port Company assets, liabilities and operations to Dublin Port Company by an order of statutory instruments.

Against this background, Dublin Port Company decided to divest in dredging business resulting in placing the Dundalk registered ship on the market for sale. The small ship at first glance resembles the last of the Guinness ships, The Lady Patricia and the world's first custom built liquid-bulk (pumped on board) stout tanker Miranda Guinness.

Unfortunately these vessels with such strong and unique histories were not saved from the breakers-torch whereas the humble Hebble Sand continues as a working ship. She is a testament to her builders Richard (Shipbuilders) of Lowestoft who built her for British Dredging and subsequent owners spanning a career at a shave off fifty years.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#DUBLIN PORT TUGS SOLD – Ben Eadar becomes the final member of an older generation of tugs to be sold having belonged to the Dublin Port & Docks Board (DP&DB) which was later to become the Dublin Port Company, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 17-tonnes bollard pull (tbp) Ben Eadar (built 1973 / 198grt) was sold to ARPA & Co. of Setubal, Portugal, though ironically she may be towed to her new working grounds.

She was the oldest of the trio alongside her fleetmates Cluain Tarbh (1991/268grt) and Deilginis (1997/335grt).

They were eventually replaced when the first of a pair of newbuilds entered in 2009. The Deilginis therefore was the last tug commissioned by the DP&DB. In addition they were the last tugs named after Dublin Bay coastal suburbs spelt in Irish. Deilginis is a translation for Dalkey, Cluain Tarbh for Clontarf and Ben Eadar for Howth.

The 35tbp Cluain Tarbh was renamed Elliot in February after her transfer to new owners T.P. Towing in Gibraltar while the 37tbp Deilginis remains in Irish waters.

She made a delivery voyage several weeks ago to Killybegs to start a new career with Sinbad Marine Services. The newcomer replaces another Voith Schneider tug the Carron of 24tbp which was sold to the Forth Bridge Consortium.

With only 13,000 working hours clocked-up on Deilginis main Caterpillar engines, she is however to undergo an upgrade to install new piping and wheelhouse electronics amongst other alterations.

Currently the Deilginis is classified with Bureau Veritas and has a notation of coastal waters but Sinbad intend to upgrade this to Limited European Area (LEA) waters so to increase a greater operational role.

She joins the multi-purpose Sinbad fleet which provide coastal towage, berthing assistance, oil spill recovery, fire fighting and dredging assistance.

Published in Dublin Port

#PORTS & SHIPPING - The Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) and Coastlink are to jointly host Shortsea 12, The European Shortsea Convention at the Mansion House, Dublin on 24th May 2012.

This year's event sponsored by the Dublin Port Company, will bring together Europe's senior executives, representing leading Shortsea operators (bulk and unitised) shippers & buyers of transport services, port and maritime terminal operators, logistics and supply chain companies.

The convention will provide a platform to network, discuss and debate current industry issues. In addition it will focus on the key Industry issues that are informed by the industry:

• State of the Shortsea Markets.

• Views of major European Exporters and Supply Chain managers.

• Analysis of current issues facing Shortsea Ports and Shipowners

A pre-conference high-level networking event will be hosted on the evening of the 23rd of May for delegates and industry executives.

For further information about Shortsea 12 click HERE

Published in Ports & Shipping

#DUBLIN PORT-Cruise-passenger numbers in Dublin Port rose by 7.5% this year according to yesterdays' Irish Times.

During the 2011 cruise season, some 87 cruiseships brought over 135,000 passengers and crew to Dublin, delivering an estimated boost of between €35 and €55 million to the capital.

The port operator expects a similar number of cruise passengers next year. "Dublin Port's cruise season is becoming an increasingly important part of Dublin's tourism product," said chief executive Eamonn O'Reilly.

"Next year will see consolidation on our growth in recent years, while 2013 will see cruise line companies calling at Dublin for the first time and other operators bringing larger ships," he said.

Published in Dublin Port
#TALL SHIPS - Eighteen vessels are on the entry list for the 2012 Tall Ships Races which are set to conclude in Dublin Port next August.
The list is dominated by British entries, with all nine UK tall ships expected to sail the third and final leg from A Coruña in northern Spain to Dublin.
Tall ships from Russia, Poland, France, Ecuador, Bulgaria, Latvia, Estonia and Belgium will also be in the fray when Ireland's capital hosts the final port of call for the 2012 races, presented by Szczecin in Poland and organised by Sail Training International - a charity established to harness sail training to develop and educate young people regardless of nationality, culture, religion, gender or social background.
The first leg of the 2012 races kicks off in Saint-Malo, France on 7 July with ships racing to Lisbon in Portugal (till 21 July); Cádiz in southern Spain (21-28 July) and A Coruña (28 July-12 August) before the final leg.
Dublin will be hosting the Tall Ships Races for the first time since 1998. Earlier this year Eamonn O’Reilly, CEO of Dublin Port Company, said he was “delighted to welcome the Tall Ships Races to Dublin Port" in 2012.
Since the announcement the port has already played host to the British tall ship Tenacious and the Norwegian vessel S/S Statsraad Lehmkuhl.
From Thursday 23 to Sunday 26 August 2012 as man as 100 ships are expected to arrive in the port and Docklands area for an event that includes a four-day festival programme of music, food and fashion showcases, markets, street theatre, water sport and water-based activities.
The weekend will also feature activities unique to the races including a crew parade, prize-giving event and a parade of sail.
Are you looking to get involved in Dublin's hosting of the Tall Ships Races? Check out the following links:
Become a trainee www.dublintallships.ie/trainees/
Take part as a volunteer www.dublintallships.ie/volunteers/
For further information see www.dublintallships.ie or e-mail [email protected]
Entry List for the Tall Ships Races 2012:
Akela (Russia)
Black Diamond Of Durham (UK)
Dar Mlodziezy (Poland)
Etoile Polaire (France)
Guayas (Ecuador)
Johanna Lucretia (UK)
John Laing (UK)
Kaliakra (Bulgaria)
Lord Nelson (UK)
Maybe (UK)
Moosk (UK)
Pelican Of London (UK)
Pogoria (Poland)
Rona II (UK)
Spaniel (Latvia)
St Iv (Estonia)
Thermopylae Clipper (UK)
Tomidi (Belgium)

#TALL SHIPS - Eighteen vessels are on the entry list for the 2012 Tall Ships Races which are set to conclude in Dublin Port next August.

The list is dominated by British entries, with all nine UK tall ships expected to sail the third and final leg from A Coruña in northern Spain to Dublin.

Tall ships from Russia, Poland, France, Ecuador, Bulgaria, Latvia, Estonia and Belgium will also be in the fray when Ireland's capital hosts the final port of call for the 2012 races, presented by Szczecin in Poland and organised by Sail Training International - a charity established to harness sail training to develop and educate young people regardless of nationality, culture, religion, gender or social background.

The first leg of the 2012 races kicks off in Saint-Malo, France on 7 July with ships racing to Lisbon in Portugal (till 21 July); Cádiz in southern Spain (21-28 July) and A Coruña (28 July-12 August) before the final leg.

Dublin will be hosting the Tall Ships Races for the first time since 1998. Earlier this year Eamonn O’Reilly, CEO of Dublin Port Company, said he was “delighted to welcome the Tall Ships Races to Dublin Port" in 2012.

Since the announcement the port has already played host to the British tall ship Tenacious and the Norwegian vessel S/S Statsraad Lehmkuhl.

From Thursday 23 to Sunday 26 August 2012 as many as 100 ships are expected to arrive in the port and Docklands area for an event that includes a four-day festival programme of music, food and fashion showcases, markets, street theatre, water sport and water-based activities. 

The weekend will also feature activities unique to the races including a crew parade, prize-giving event and a parade of sail.

Are you looking to get involved in Dublin's hosting of the Tall Ships Races? Check out the following links:

Become a trainee www.dublintallships.ie/trainees/

Take part as a volunteer www.dublintallships.ie/volunteers/

For further information see www.dublintallships.ie or e-mail [email protected]

Entry List for the Tall Ships Races 2012:

Akela (Russia)

Black Diamond Of Durham (UK)

Dar Mlodziezy (Poland)

Etoile Polaire (France)

Guayas (Ecuador)

Johanna Lucretia (UK)

John Laing (UK)

Kaliakra (Bulgaria)

Lord Nelson (UK)

Maybe (UK)

Moosk (UK)

Pelican Of London (UK)

Pogoria (Poland)

Rona II (UK)

Spaniel (Latvia)

St Iv (Estonia)

Thermopylae Clipper (UK)

Tomidi (Belgium)

 

Published in Tall Ships

#DUBLIN PORT-The former Dundalk Port Company grab-hopper dredger Hebble Sand (1963/757grt), which has been laid-up in Dublin since last Summer, was sold to new owners a month ago, writes Jehan Ashmore.

She remains berthed at the Bulk Jetty, Alexandra Basin, where she arrived from the Co. Louth port on 14 July, two days after the assets, liabilities and operations of Dundalk Port Company were transferred to Dublin Port Company by an order of statutory instrument. Against this background, Dublin Port Company decided to divest in the business of dredging resulting in placing the veteran vessel for sale.

During her career in Drogheda, she was the only dredger to be operated and owned by a port company apart from the suction-trailer dredger Lough Foyle (1979/868grt) operated by Londonderry Port & Harbour Commissioners.

Hebble Sand, registered in Dundalk has retained her original name since her launch from Richard (Shipbuilders) of Lowestoft for British Dredging. She has been kept in good condition considering a career nearing five decades. To read some of her last contracts undetaken outside her homeport, click HERE.

From a distance some people have mistaken Hebble Sand (PHOTO) to the last of the  'Guinness ships, as she bores a resemblance to the final custom-built stout tanker Miranda Guinness ( PHOTO), taken on her farewell sailing. The vessels shared a similar red funnel and black funnel, a roomy sized superstructure painted in cream above and a dark blue hull. To read more about the last of the brewery tanker-fleet click HERE.

Published in Dublin Port
# CRUISE SHIPS - Dublin Port's 'draft' masterplan which was unveiled to the public today, includes a proposal to develop the first dedicated cruise terminal in the capital port. A site at North Wall Quay Extension has been chosen to handle larger vessels capable of berthing and the location would be closer to the city-centre, writes Jehan Ashmore.
With the increasing demand of the cruiseship sector to Dublin and Irish ports in general, the port recognises the need to further develop future growth prospects and the wider strategic importance to the city. This year the port handled over 85 cruise callers with 130,000 passengers visiting the capital which accrued to €50m to the local economy and €700,000 in direct revenue to the port.

In order to facilitate this growth, the draft proposes switching existing berths used by large cruiseships away from unattractive cargo-docks in Alexandra Basin's West and East and at Ocean Pier. Up to three alternative locations were examined and the port agreed that the option identified in the Dublin City Council's Area Plan of the North Quay Extension is the optimum location.

Before any such development, it would require relocating an existing roll-on roll-off terminal (No.3), which is currently in use by P&O Irish Sea for their Dublin-Liverpool service. The company operate three sailings daily on the central corridor route.

The new facility could accommodate two large cruise ships simultaneously and would be much larger than the 43,524grt The World, the luxury resort vessel operated by Residensea, which docked at the North Wall Extension in 2010 (for report click HERE).

The location is on the doorstep to the East-Link Bridge and the neighbouring O2 Arena and Point Village developed by Harry Crosbie, who called for the relocation of cruise callers to be sited upriver.

According to the draft, the closer proximity to the city-centre would provide a stronger presence and a more accessible link with the city. It would also avoid the unnecessary longer bus transfers between cruise berths and visitor attractions in the city-centre and locations in counties Wicklow and Meath.

Construction of facilities for a cruise terminal would expensive as it will involve new quay walls capable of accepting large cruise vessels but this could only be done after dredging the channel to a depth of 10.5m.

The facilities of the terminal are to incorporate a reception, tourist information and interpretive centre, a dedicated entrance for pedestrians, coaches, vehicles and traffic management measures would be implemented.

In addition the site would also require the expensive exercise in re-locating ESB underwater high-voltage cables. The initial costs suggest to develop new terminal facilities and associated works would be in the region of €30m.

Dublin Port Company, state that due to the relatively low revenues generated by cruise ships, such an investment alone could not be justified, however, they could part-fund the development but additional funding would be required from other sources.

Published in Ferry
Page 5 of 8

Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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