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Displaying items by tag: Home Nations Internationals

#Angling - 2014 is proving to be a momentous year for shore angling in Ireland with a huge victory by Team Ireland at the Home Nations International Shore Angling Championships, which took place on the East Coast of Scotland last weekend.

The Senior Mens, Ladies and Under 16s teams all won gold, while the Under 21s Youth team took fourth place at this year's Home Nations Internationals, organised by the Scottish Federation of Sea Anglers and fished over two days at Montrose, a small town some 30 miles north of Dundee.

The championships - one of the highlights of the Home Nations angling calendar - are run under the auspices of the Sea Angling Liaison Committee of the United Kingdom and Ireland, and all the Irish anglers had fished the Irish Federation of Sea Anglers approved provincial qualifiers and the All-Ireland Inter-Provincial competitions to get their place on Team Ireland.

Friday 4 July saw the start of a highly competitive two days' fishing on Lunan beach, which proved challenging for all teams as conditions were wet, windy and weedy.

On day two, however, the weather improved. The Ladies, Under 21s and Under 16s teams fished the estuary near the Tay bridge in Dundee, a muddy estuary with flounder and eels as top catches. The Senior Men’s team, meanwhile, fished a rock venue and had mixed bags of codling, rockling and conger eels.

The success of all the teams is very positive in ensuring a future for shore angling for all in Ireland. This was also the inaugural championship for the Ladies teams as it was the first year that England, Wales Scotland and Ireland all sent women to the championships. Their success will surely prove a big boost for women's angling in Ireland.

The teams were supported by Angling Council of Ireland and Inland Fisheries Ireland, who are considering further more substantial financial support for international teams due to the obvious benefits of having top-class ambassadors abroad espousing the quality of angling and hospitality in Ireland.

The involvement and support from Coaching Ireland and the Irish Sports Council (ISC) has had obvious benefits, though according to Irish Federation of Sea Anglers (IFSA) chairman Tom Lillis: "It is about time the ISC opened the purse strings to get fully behind the IFSA as we will be hosting two CIPS World Championships in Ireland with a World Boat Championships in 2015, followed by the world Shore Fishing Championships for Men and Women in 2016."

The IFSA congratulated everyone involved for their hard work and dedication and thanked the Scottish Federation for their hospitality and friendship.

Team Ireland:
Senior Men's Team - Manager: John O'Brien; Team: Mike Curtin, Martin Howlin, Joe Carley, Noel Fogarty, Paul Whelan and reserve Peter Atkins
Ladies' Team - Manager: Jane Cantwell; Team: Lisa Gormley, Paula Johnston, Mary Hyland, Linda Manton, Anne Whitty
Youth Team/Under 21s - Manager: Jim Snoddy; Team: Gavin Fogarty, Alan Turner, Cian Egan, Ross Nolan, Nathan Davidson
Under 16s Team - Manager: John Kinsella; Team: Eamon Jones, Conor McDermott, Sean Cushin, Ruari Ganley, David Farrelly

Published in Angling

Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!