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Displaying items by tag: IOM Steam Packet

Ferry operator the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company will officially mark its 190th anniversary on Tuesday (tomorrow).

It's the world’s oldest continually-operating passenger shipping company and has served the Island since 30 June 1830.

The Steam Packet, reports Manx Radio, started with a wooden paddle steamer known as Mona's Isle, built at a cost of £7,052, which was launched from Glasgow after being built on the River Clyde.

After arriving in Douglas, her maiden passenger crossing from the Isle of Man took place in mid-August that year.

To celebrate the milestone the Packet's fleet, decked in bunting, will sound its whistles in Douglas Harbour at 6pm on tomorrow evening (30 June).

Published in Ferry

The Isle of Man Steam Packet's fastferry, Manannan is to remain in Manx waters this winter.

According to EnergyFM, the passenger /vehicle craft concluded the 2019 season earlier this month, maintaining a 100% technical reliability record during the whole summer, according to the company.

Completing 759 sailings and travelling 51,777 nautical miles, the high-speed ferry also operated a 98.15% punctuality record, as the season drew to a close.

Manannan will now be moored in Douglas Harbour before undergoing an annual overhaul ahead of services resuming on 27th March next year.

Click here for more details.

Published in Ferry

The Isle of Man Steam Packet Company wants public opinion on a new ship. 

The ferry operator reports Manx Radio, wants to know your thoughts, as it prepares for 'major investment in its fleet'.

The company has plans to replace the Ben-my-Chree with a purpose-built ship, designed and constructed over the next three years.

Passengers past, present and future are invited to submit their views, specifically relating to on-board facility preferences, through a survey (click here) which is being hosted by Island Global Research.

For more click here. 

Published in Ferry

A completion date for the new £38m Liverpool landing stage for Isle of Man ferries has been delayed.

According to IOMToday, it will be in the summer, as the completion date for the ferry terminal was given as February 2021, but that has been put back to July of that year.

However, Infrastructure Minister Ray Harmer said he was hoping it would be ready for the TT, which gets under way at the end of May.

The delay was due to the discharge of planning conditions and some legal agreements taking ’longer than anticipated’, he said.

It was also revealed that dredging is required for the project which Afloat adds will see the Isle of Man Steam Packet use the new terminal. 

For more on this development click here. 

Published in Ferry

In an aim to introduce electric vehicle charging points, a campaign has been set up to apply this on board ferries of the Isle of Man Steam Packet.

David Dorricott from the Mountain View Innovation Centre based outside the (harbour town of Ramsey) wants people to be able to 'charge whilst you cross'.

He says the Island is behind other nearby companies, which have brought in ferry EV charging. 

For more Manx Radio reports having contacted the Steam Packet Company for a response with a podcast available through this link.

Published in Ferry

According to EnergyFM, the chairman of the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company will retire in Spring 2020 after holding his position for over 20 years.

Robert Quayle was appointed as chair in 2008 and was a director of the ferry company for more than two decades.

He will step down from his role on March 31st next year.

Mr Quayle said: ‘It has been a privilege to serve this great Company over a fascinating period in its long history. I have witnessed a number of changes of ownership during that time but the Company has continued to provide a consistent and reliable service to the Island community throughout.'

More here from the radio station. 

Published in Ferry

Ferry firm the Isle of Man Steam Packet made a profit of £9.3m in the year that it was acquired by the Manx government.

But operating profits writes IOMToday, have fallen slightly.

Accounts for the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company Group Ltd for the year ending December 31, 2018, will be laid before this week’s Tynwald sitting.

They show profits for the year attributable to equity owners at £9,332,364 compared to £8,421,874 in 2017.

But operating profit, at £10,470,595, was down slightly from £10,813,574 the previous year.

The group was acquired by the Treasury on May 24 last year for a total of £124.7m, represented by debt of £75.9m and equity of £48.8m.

For more here on the accounts of the company. 

Published in Ferry

The Manx government will be required to guarantee the Isle of Man Steam Packet’s loans when it builds its new ferries.

Under the terms of the sea services agreement, the company must provide two new ships, with the first due to be in service in 2022.

In a Treasury report, due to be presented to Tynwald (Manx Parliament) on the refinancing of the £76m the company owes the taxpayer, it is also revealed that a government guarantee on the loans for new boats will be required.

The section of the report titled ’Additional Company Debt’ details the necessity for new ships and that ’it will require borrowing’.

For more the IOMToday reports here.  

Published in Ferry

IOMToday writes that arm’s-length Manx government-owned ferry operations such as the Isle of Man Steam Packet could become subject to Freedom of Information laws.

Minister for Policy and Reform Chris Thomas says that transparency when public money is involved is important, but must be balanced against commercial confidentiality.

The issue of arm’s-length companies and FoI requests was highlighted when the Positive Action Group submitted a request in relation to the Steam Packet which was rejected.

The PAG asked the government’s Department of Infrastructure for ’figures for the carbon emissions of the Steam Packet fleet (for both the Manannan and the Ben-my-Chree individually) per kilometre, per mile or per journey’.

However, this was rejected as the Department of Infrastructure does not hold that information.

The DoI said in its response: ’You may already be aware that the Isle of Man Steam Packet Company is not subject to Freedom of Information, although they may be open to a dialogue on the subject if you approach them direct.’

In response to this, Mr Thomas told the Isle of Man Examiner that he personally thinks that FoI might need to be ’tailored for arm’s-length operations, in several variants for each of the types of public bodies that currently exist or might come to exist’.

The Manx government bought the Steam Packet last year for £124 million and to read more on the FoI related story click here. 

Published in Ferry

#ferries - The ferry Ben-My-Chree operated by the Isle of Man Steam Packet has been confirmed by the company of its return to Manx waters yesterday.

Manx Radio reports the ferry's arrival (in Douglas) follows what the operator called  "successful regulatory overhaul" at Cammell Laird in Birkenhead.

In a post on social media, staff said they are "pleased to welcome her back" and "look forward to her returning to scheduled services" tomorrow (Thursday). 

To see details on sailings in full, click here. 

Published in Ferry
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Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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