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Displaying items by tag: Ports & Shipping

#PORTS & SHIPPING – Arklow Shipping is further expanding its bulker fleet and moving into the market for larger vessels with an order for three ships in South Korea, according to Tradewinds.

The company which is headquartered in the Co. Wicklow port has booked two 35,000-dwt handysize-bulkers and a general cargoship at Daesun Shipbuilding. TradeWinds sources say Arklow is paying a premium for the ships against more competitive pricing from China.

Brokers price the Daesun bulkers at around $25.5m, which compares to similar deals in China at around $22m. As for the general cargoship, she will be delivered in the first half of 2013 and the bulkers in the second half of the year. Arklow previously signed up for a series of 14,000-dwt multipurpose (MPP) vessels at Mokpo, which later went into administration.

The orders were then passed on to Sekwang Shipbuilding only for it also to fall into financial difficulties. Daesun has had its problems too and was delisted from the Seoul Stock Exchange in April as it did not meet the bourse's financial requirements.

The latest order appears to have taken Arklow's owned fleet into the larger-handysize segment. So far it has focussed mainly on bulkers, general-cargo and MPP ships up to 14,000 dwt. It has a fleet of 55 ships including 12 newbuildings, most of which are registered in the Republic of Ireland. Arklow declines to comment on the Daesun order.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#CRUISE LINERS- In a first for Drogheda Port, the cruiseship, Clipper Adventurer (1975/4,367grt) is to call next May, and will represent  a new business to the port  as part of its circumnavigation of the island of Ireland, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 101m long vessel  will bring 236 American and Canadian visitors and a 65 crew, on a cruise organised by Adventure Canada, in association with Royal Canadian Geographical Society.

During the 10-day circumnavigation, the vessel will make calls to the Co. Louth port with passengers touring the Boyne Valley, The Skelligs, Aran Islands, the Gardens on Garnish at Glengariff and Tory Island. They will take in the history, archaeology, bird and marine life, culture, and Irish music in addition to a lecture programme from an on board team.

"With its downtown location, Drogheda Port is perfect for us," says Matthew Swan, president of Adventure Canada.

Last year, Swan visited Drogheda to conduct research for the cruise trip around Ireland. "I heard about your Graffiti and Samba Festivals before coming to town. It seemed like my kind of place, I'm definitely coming back for the Samba event."

Nessa Lally of Drogheda Port commented on the launch of the port as a new cruise destination: "Drogheda Port Company is pleased to announce the inaugural visit of the Clipper Adventurer to our port. This is the beginning of something special for Drogheda and the Boyne Valley.

The area has tremendous potential as a regular cruise destination with world class and potential world class attractions such as Newgrange, Slane Castle, Beaulieu House, the Battle of the Boyne site, the Hill of Tara and medieval Drogheda town itself, to mention just a few.

We will very much welcome the Clipper Adventurer and its passengers to our port and town and intend to give them a memorable visit to our locality. The port company has also commenced a dialogue with a number of interested parties to build and brand a full local itinerary for attracting and growing cruise business and tourism."

In the same month of the inaugural cruise, Drogheda will host a second cruise also by Clipper Adventurer, with Danish passengers organized through Copenhagen-based tour operator, Albatros Travel. They will undertake a 10-day Irish and Scottish itinerary that finishes in Bergen, Norway.

Clipper Adventurer is an exploration vessel which otherwise is often found cruising in polar waters, either Antarctica or the Arctic from Spitsbergen through Iceland, Greenland and Canada's Northwest Passage.

Over the last decade she has called to several Irish ports to include a once-off call to Arklow, where the Serbian-built vessel anchored offshore.

Published in Cruise Liners

#PORTS & SHIPPING- The volume of shipping and port traffic through the Republic of Ireland continued to decline during the third quarter of 2011, according to the latest analysis of traffic figures released by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO).

Results from third quarter data indicate that only 1 of the 5 principal freight segments had any growth over the third quarter, while all other segments declined compared to the same period last year as outlined below in the key third quarter data:-

• Lift-on/Lift-off (lo/lo) trades were down 5%

• Roll-on/Roll-off export traffic was down by 2%

• Dry bulk volumes increased by 2%

• Break bulk volumes were down by 3%

• The Tanker/Liquid bulk market was down 7%.

For a more in-depth analysis of each freight-transport mode issued by the IMDO and accompanied by graphic charts click HERE. In addition to compare the 3rd quarter figures with the previous 2nd quater for this year click HERE.

Published in Ports & Shipping
Page 6 of 6

Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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