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Displaying items by tag: The World

Though 'The World' Liner docked first in Dublin this month, it was not until she pulled in to the deepwater quay at Cobh in Cork Harbour did we see photographs as pretty as those captured last night by marine photographer Bob Bateman. As he prepared for the 10.30pm photo shoot the new Cork Swansea ferry 'Julia' sailed by to add to the vibrant Cork Harbour maritime scene. Bob's photos below:

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Published in Cork Harbour

The World, a 644 foot ship, owned by its residents arrived at the Poolbeg lighthouse on Dublin bay yesterday afternoon (Wednesday, August 4 2010) for a four day stop over in Dublin. The residents, from about 40 different countries, live on board as it slowly circumnavigates the globe. Arrival photos below:

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Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

After an afternoon arrival in Dublin Port (today) on 4th August, The World, the first ocean-going luxury resort vessel is to stay in the capital for a four-day stay, writes Jehan Ashmore.

 

After an afternoon arrival in Dublin Port on 4th August, The World,
the first and only ocean-going luxury resort vessel is to stay in the
capital for a four-day stay, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The World is not a conventional cruiseship, but is a unique concept in
that passengers can have the ultimate lifestyle experience of staying
onboard as residents, living in their own ultra-luxury private
penthouse suites.
There are 165 private residences onboard the eight-year vessel. The
luxurious two and three bedroom residences are fully-furnished,
complete with a living and diningroom area, kitchen, bathroom and
verandah. The average occupancy of residents and guest at any one
time, varies between 150-200 people.
As of 2006, all the residential 'homes' were sold. Like any private
community, there are opportunities to purchase apartments that are
available for re-sale. Guests can also take a holiday by renting a
residence from a selection of units.
Facilities include several small restaurants, a theatre, library,
delicatessen. Leisure activities feature a health spa and two swimming
pools and a stern-mounted retractable marina-deck. On the top-deck
there is a full-sized tennis court, a putting green with authentic
grass and driving range. Should the golf balls career off deck and
plonk in the ocean, the balls are bio-degradable and dissolve within
96 hours.
The 43,524gt vessel had arrived overnight from Cardiff and is docked
close to the East-Link toll bridge. Passing motorists and pedestrians
alike will have an opportunity to see The World until this Saturday (7
August).
Notably the nearby attraction of the new Dublin Wheel, at the Point
Village provides an excellent venue to take views of The World and
Dublin's Fair City. The floating residency departs Dublin early on
Sunday morning to dock at Cobh the next day for three-days (9-11
August).
The Norwegian built vessel, completed by Fosen Mek, Rissa in 2002,
made a first visit to Dublin in that same year. It was during those
heady boom-years, that the largest penthouse suite covering over
3,220sq ft cost US$ 6.8m.
The ethos of living onboard while seeing the World on a continous
cruising mode, was the concept of The World's founder, Knut Kloster
junior. Kloster established ResidenSea which originally intended to
order a 85,000 gross tonnes vessel but this was radically scaled down
due to customer demand.
In September, The World sails to Greenland for a ten day expedition.
After that the vessel heads onto North America with Christmas 2010
devoted to exploring Antartica.

The World is not a conventional cruiseship, but is a unique concept inthat passengers can have the ultimate lifestyle experience of stayingonboard as residents, living in their own ultra-luxury privatepenthouse suites.

There are 165 private residences onboard the eight-year vessel. Theluxurious two and three bedroom residences are fully-furnished,complete with a living and diningroom area, kitchen, bathroom andverandah. The average occupancy of residents and guest at any onetime, varies between 150-200 people.

As of 2006, all the residential 'homes' were sold. Like any privatecommunity, there are opportunities to purchase apartments that areavailable for re-sale. Guests can also take a holiday by renting aresidence from a selection of units.

Facilities include several small restaurants, a theatre, library,delicatessen. Leisure activities feature a health spa and two swimmingpools and a stern-mounted retractable marina-deck. On the top-deckthere is a full-sized tennis court, a putting green with authenticgrass and driving range. Should the golf balls career off deck andplonk in the ocean, the balls are bio-degradable and dissolve within96 hours.

The 43,524gt vessel had arrived overnight from Cardiff and is dockedclose to the East-Link toll bridge. Passing motorists and pedestriansalike will have an opportunity to see The World until this Saturday (7August).

Notably the nearby attraction of the new Dublin Wheel, at the PointVillage provides an excellent venue to take views of The World andDublin's Fair City. The floating residency departs Dublin early onSunday morning to dock at Cobh the next day for three-days (9-11August).

The Norwegian built vessel, completed by Fosen Mek, Rissa in 2002,made a first visit to Dublin in that same year. It was during thoseheady boom-years, that the largest penthouse suite covering over3,220sq ft cost US$ 6.8m.

The ethos of living onboard while seeing the World on a continouscruising mode, was the concept of The World's founder, Knut Klosterjunior. Kloster established ResidenSea which originally intended toorder a 85,000 gross tonnes vessel but this was radically scaled downdue to customer demand.

In September, The World sails to Greenland for a ten day expedition.After that the vessel heads onto North America with Christmas 2010devoted to exploring Antartica.

 

The_World_moored_alongside_North_Wall_Quay_Extension__Dublin._Photo_Jehan_Ashmore-ShipSNAPS_4

The World moored alongside North Wall Quay Extension,  Dublin. Photo Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

Published in Ports & Shipping

The ports of Dublin and Cork are scheduled to receive a record 139 cruiseships in total this year, bringing 180,000 visitors and crew. Many more of these cruiseships are due to visit over the next two months and stretching into late Autumn. Between €35-55m is expected to be generated into the Dublin region from high-spend cruise visitors
while a further €5m is predicted for the local economy at Cork, writes Jehan Ashmore.

A notable visitor due to grace Dublin Bay is the return of The World, albeit not strictly a cruiseship but the first custom-built time-share ship. The vessel is to dock in the capital for four-nights from 4-8 August and then sails overnight to Cobh, for two-nights from 9-11 August.

In essence, The World presents an exclusively unique lifestyle experience. Instead of passengers, there are 'residents' who live onboard. Residents of the 43,188 gross tonnes (GT) vessel don't merely occupy a cabin but own large-sized luxurously appointed private apartments that are 'home' complete with balconies.

On 9 August, Silver Cloud docks at Dublin from Oban, Scotland. Measuring 16,927 GT, the vessel may not be the largest with only 315 passengers, but is an ultra-luxury cruiseship, regarded as one of the highest standards in the cruise-sector industry.

Returning to Cork Harbour, Cobh awaits the mighty Independence of the Seas. At 154,407 tonnes, she is the biggest ever cruiseship to dock at any Irish port. With a massive 4,375 passenger capacity, attractions include rock-climbing or surfing-boarding  using a special pool. The 'Independence' berths mid-afternoon on 29 August for an overnight call, departing 18.00hrs the next day.

Among smaller cruiseships, the private-motoryacht like, Island Sky of 4,000 tonnes and with 200 passengers, calls to Dublin on 11 August, and may berth upriver close to the new Samual Beckett Bridge.

Those keen on traditional ships, can look forward to the visit of Classic International Cruises Princess Danae, built in 1955. The veteran is due 16 August, and her sister, Princess Daphne is expected 2 September. Unusually the 16,000 tonnes pair were converted from general cargo-ships for a career in cruising.

New cruiseship, Costa Luminosa (92,700 GT) costing US $ 548m makes a second call to Cobh on 3 September and is operated by Costa Cruises.
This is the first time the Italian company has ventured into Irish cruising waters.

Without doubt the largest Dublin caller this season will be Emerald Princess. The giant weighs some 113,000 gross tonnes and at 288m long will certainly provide a spectacle, with lights blaring over a dozen or so decks, during a dusk departure on 14 September.

Also entering service this year, P&O Cruises 116,000 tonnes new Azura, is set to visit Dublin on 23 September and Cork the next day. The Italian built newbuild cost US $ 535m and has a capacity for 3,076 passengers.

Ocean_Countess_departing_Dublin._Photo__Jehan_Ashmore_-_ShipSNAPS

Ocean Countess departing Dublin. Photo: Jehan Ashmore/ShipSNAPS

A newcomer to Irish ports is Cruise & Maritime Voyages Ocean Countess which is making round Ireland itineraries with calls at Cobh on 13 August and 12 September. Incidently the 'Countess' was converted into a troopship for the Falkland Islands conflict in 1982.

Jewel of the Seas (90,090 GT) makes a Cobh call on 7 September and exactly a month later returns, marking the last cruise-call to Cork in 2010 while Fred Olsen's Boudicca will be Dublin's last caller on 20 November.

For further information on other visiting cruiseships, please click links:

www.dublinport.ie/not-in-menu/cruise-ship-scheduled/

www.portofcork.ie/index.cfm/page/cruiseschedule2010

Published in Ports & Shipping
Page 2 of 2

Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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