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Displaying items by tag: Waterways Ireland

Waterways Ireland advises that further diving operations will be conducted on floating breakwaters along the Shannon Navigation from this coming Tuesday (16 August).

Masters of vessels are requested to proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of the works at Spencer Harbour and Cleighran More on Lough Allen in Co Leitrim, Derryvunny and Rockingham on Lough Key and Kilglass in Co Roscommon until Tuesday 23 August.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways previously announced diving operations taking place from 11-19 August at Ballyleague on Lough Ree, Castle Harbour in Portumna and Garrykennedy on Lough Derg, and Limerick city.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all users of the Lower Bann that essential long-term maintenance works have been completed at Carnroe Lock and it is now reopened to navigation, as of Friday 12 August.

New upstream gates were announced in late 2020 for the Northern Ireland river lock which last had its gates replaced more than 50 years ago, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of all craft on the Shannon-Erne Waterway of a boat wreck partially obstructing the navigation on the River Erne approaching Belturbet in Co Cavan.

Masters are requested to exercise caution at the location of the wreck some 800m downstream of the public moorings in Belturbet.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it will commence work to clear the obstruction in the week commencing this coming Monday 15 August.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland says it’s been notified of the presence of blue-green algae in a number of locations on the inland waterways.

Blue-green algae are toxic to humans and potentially lethal to animals.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways asks boaters to comply with the notices placed by local authorities and avoid contact or immersive activities in areas where blue-green algae are present.

Waterways Ireland jetties and slipways remain open, but the agency advises boaters and other users to stay out of the water.

It also asks for the public to report any encounters with blue-green algal blooms to the relevant local authority.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and waterways users on the Shannon Navigation that restrictions around the construction of the new pedestrian and cycleway bridge in Athlone will continue until the end of next month.

Additionally, the first section of the bridge will be floated downstream from Wansboro Field on a large pontoon from Tuesday 30 to Wednesday 31 August.

Two tugs will be manoeuvring the 18 sqm pontoon, and two safety boats will be on the river during the bridge moving operation.

In preparation for the bridge moving operation, the three upstream sections of the new Waterways Ireland jetty at the railway bridge will be removed from Thursday 25 August.

All power and water to the remaining sections of the jetty will be disconnected for safety reasons from this date, and the red navigation markers at the railway bridge will also be removed.

No vessel will be allowed to moor on this jetty from 8pm on Monday 29 August until 8pm on Wednesday 31 August.

Masters of vessels are advised to proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of the works and to follow the instructions of safety craft and personnel in the area, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on the Shannon Navigation that diving operations will be conducted on the floating breakwaters in four locations between Lough Ree and Limerick from Thursday 11 August until next Friday 19 August.

Masters of vessels are requested to proceed with additional caution in the vicinity of the diving operations taking place at Ballyleague on Lough Ree, Castle Harbour in Portumna and Garrykennedy on Lough Derg, and Limerick city.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels on the Shannon Navigation that eight small green navigation markers will be installed at the Hexagon Shoal in Lough Ree from Monday 1 August for a trial period.

Four of these markers will be installed on the north side of Marker 615, with the rest installed on the east side of that marker.

Waterways Ireland also advises boaters to always use an up-to-date navigation guide when boating on the Shannon Navigation.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland wishes to advise all masters and users of the Shannon Navigation of navigation and mooring restrictions in Carrick-on-Shannon to facilitate the Carrick Rowing Regatta on Sunday 31 July.

The regatta, hosted by Carrick-on-Shannon Rowing Club, will be held on a 500-metre stretch of water immediately south of the town bridge commencing at 9am and finishing at around 6pm.

Craft wishing to make a through passage will be facilitated approximately every two hours during the course of the regatta.

Only vessels of an overall length of 22ft/6.8m or less are currently permitted on the floating jetties until the completion of the regatta. This is necessary in the interest of marine safety and to facilitate the laying of the competition course.

Vessels berthed from 4pm on Wednesday 27 July will be required to remain in place until racing finishes on Sunday.

Masters are advised to proceed at slow speed and with due caution and to take note of advice from course marshals when passing through the area.

Published in Inland Waterways

Phase 2 of the Ulster Canal restoration has been officially initiated with a contract signing in Clones, Co Monaghan this morning (Monday 25 July).

The contract was signed by Waterways Ireland chief executive John McDonagh and John Pentony, managing director of Jons Civil Engineering Company Ltd in the presence of Minister for Housing, Local Government and Heritage, Darragh O’Brien and Minister for Rural and Community Development, Heather Humphreys.
 
The project, which is due to go on site in August 2022, will involve the development of a new marina, two new access bridges, repairs to an existing masonry arch bridge and a sustainable water supply.

It will also include approximately 1km of restored canal and towpath, with a looped walk and an amenity area on the route of the 180-year-old Ulster Canal in Clones.

The amenity area will include car parking, bus/trailer spaces, a service block and picnic area and will be connected to the town and the existing playground. This phase of the project is expected to be completed in 2023. 
 
The Ulster Canal Redevelopment Phase 2 is a substantial investment of €20m in funding under the Programme for Government. It is supported by €8m in funding from the Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage, €6m in funding from the Shared Island Fund and €6m in funding from the Department of Rural and Community Development.

Works will be undertaken by Jons Civil Engineering Company Ltd. The project will be managed by Waterways Ireland and implemented by Doran Consulting.
 
Minister O’Brien said: “This new amenity — between Clones and Clonfad — will further showcase our waterways heritage and its value to the island. The redeveloped canal is sure to be a welcome draw for locals and visitors alike, enhancing the local area and providing economic opportunity.”
 
Minister Heather Humphreys said: “As somebody who lives only a few miles out the road, I am absolutely delighted that the contracts have been signed today on the long-awaited restoration of the Ulster Canal in Clones.

“The Ulster Canal is a flagship cross-border project and I am delighted to support the development of this unique amenity with almost €6million in funding from my Department. The Ulster Canal will bring huge tourism and economic benefits not just to Clones and Co Monaghan but to the entire Border region.”
 
McDonagh also welcomed the development: “The Ulster Canal is a major link in our waterway network. Phase 2 will see substantial restoration of the canal basin near the historic Canal Stores in Clones and will provide a water-based recreational amenity area there. The Ulster Canal Greenway is also in development and will, in time, complement the canal restoration project.”
 
Work on the Ulster Canal began in 1841 and within the year it was open to commercial traffic. The navigation combining river and canal was circa 93km long, passing through Fermanagh, Cavan, Monaghan, Tyrone, and Armagh. The last trading boat using the canal was in 1929 and it officially closed in 1931.
 
Phase 1 of the project was completed in 2020. It includes some 2.5km of new river navigation along the River Finn between Quivvy Lough and Castle Saunderson. The work programme involved the dredging of the River Finn, construction of a new lateral canal and navigation arch at Derrykerrib bridge and the installation of a new floating jetty at Castle Saunderson.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all users of the Royal Canal that a kayaking and watersport event will take place in Ballynacargy Harbour in Co Westmeath from 9am to 4.30pm next Monday 18 July.

Masters of other craft are requested to proceed at slow speed and with minimum wash and note any directions issued by the stewards.

Published in Inland Waterways
Page 2 of 48

Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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