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Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

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Displaying items by tag: Waterways Ireland

The Minister for Community, Equality and Gaeltacht Affairs, Pat Carey T.D., today announced the approval of the granting of leases for a number of proposed developments on Dublin's canals on the inland waterways.

The developments include the construction of a cycle bridge across the Royal Canal at Spencer Dock, a boardwalk along the Grand Canal at Leeson Street and a pedestrian/cycle bridge across the Grand Canal at Lynches Lane.

The decision to grant leases to Dublin City Council and South Dublin County Council for the proposed developments was taken at a meeting of the North South Ministerial Council in Armagh this morning. Speaking after the meeting, Minister Carey said the decision to approve the leases had the potential to further transform Dublin's waterways for the benefit of the citizens of Dublin.

Minister Carey said, "Developments like those proposed by Dublin City Council will add to the regeneration of the city and will strengthen the environmental, social and economic fabric of the capital. They will add to the quality of life of all and especially to the quality of life of pedestrians and cyclists."

John Martin, Chief Executive of Waterways Ireland, the cross-border body charged with the all-island promotion and development of waterways is delighted that the Ministers have approved the granting of the leases at the NSMC.

He said "Waterways Ireland is happy to facilitate the development of these waterside amenities in the Dublin Area. We hope to work with all the local authorities on many projects in the future right across the Dublin Region."

Published in Inland Waterways
The 2011 Inland waterways Sponsorship Programme has been announced. Waterways Ireland may, at its discretion and depending on the availability of funds, provide sponsorship (funding and support) to groups, associations, clubs or other appropriate bodies to assist with events which meet the aims of the Waterways Ireland Sponsorship Programme and enhance the use of the waterways principally for recreational purposes.

The Sponsorship Programme can not be used to fund or contribute towards capital projects such as acquiring or developing new or existing buildings, infrastructure development or acquiring/maintaining equipment.

The Sponsorship Programme is now open and you can apply by downloading the guidelines and application form below. Please read the Guidelines carefully to ensure that the application form is completed correctly and that the proposed sponsorship event meets the eligibility criteria.

Email [email protected]g or Tel No +353 (0)71 96 50787

Closing date for receipt of completed application forms for the Waterways Ireland Sponsorship Programme is 13 December 2010 at 3pm. Incomplete or late applications cannot be assessed.

Published in Inland Waterways

The winner of the prestigious Taste of the Inland Waterways Award was revealed this week by Georgina Campbell as "Keenan's of Tarmonbarry".
Presenting the Taste of the Waterways Award to Keenan's of Tarmonbarry, Martin Dennany, Director of Marketing and Communications, Waterways Ireland stated "Keenan's of Tarmonbarry epitomises the waterway dining experience and I am delighted to present this Taste of the Waterways Award and to commend Georgina Campbell on her choice. With the recent completion of the link between the Royal Canal and the Shannon Navigation, we hope that many will take the opportunity to visit the area and to experience for themselves the delights of waterside hospitality at this fine establishment. Waterways Ireland is happy to sponsor this award and to recognise the contribution that businesses like Keenan's make to the tourism industry".
The Taste of the Waterways Award was first introduced in 2008 and runs in conjunction with "The Taste of Waterways" booklet, a publication produced by Waterways Ireland in partnership with Georgina Campbell highlighting the excellent hospitality of the waterway experience. The guide is free and updated regularly with Georgina's selection of establishments of all kinds serving food and hospitality all along the inland waterways.
Martin Dennany commenting on the guide stated "The judging criteria and standard of assessment for the Taste of the Waterways Georgina Campbell guide is very high, with selection made on merit alone: no payment is charged for entry, no payments accepted for advertising".
Georgina Campbell described Keenan's as "Just beside the bridge over the Shannon in Tarmonbarry, this well-run bar and restaurant has been a favourite watering hole for river folk for many years - and it makes a great place to break a journey between Dublin and the north-west. The range is wide, offering wholesome, hearty fare that pleases all age groups and includes very welcome traditional dishes. But it's for their steaks, above all, that people beat a path to Keenan's of Tarmonbarry - and why wouldn't they? Whether you go for a classic sirloin, a big juicy fillet, or their renowned steak sandwich, the steaks at this hospitable watering hole are not to be missed."

Published in Inland Waterways

Irish anglers showed their dominance at the Waterways Ireland World Open Pike Fishing Classic on the River Erne at Enniskillen recently.

Bothers Eddie and Frankie Roofe from Enniskillen came tops in the boat fly event, claiming the top three spots in the standings with their catches.

In the bank event, which featured a record 103 entrants, Lisburn angler Alan Foye took top prize with a 20lb 6oz monster.

But even that catch was overshadowed on day two of the boat event, when local angler Nick Seddon caught a 25lb 15oz whopper - the biggest fish in the history of the contest.

Seddon claimed first place and a £3,000 prize, followed by Darryl Curry in second and Joe third-place McDermott, both of whom caught fish over 24lb.

The team event was taken by Team Shannon, comprising father-and-son duos Joe and Jason McDermott and Barry and Finian Darby, with a total catch of 112lb.

A turnout of 363 competitors from 17 different countries caught between them a total of 227 pike over the weekend, five of which weighed over 20lb.

Published in Angling

Following receipt of planning permission, Inland Waterways Ireland is progressing with the development of a houseboat facility in Shannon Harbour where the Grand Canal meets the Shannon.

The result will be a serviced mooring facility in Shannon Harbour for 6-8 boats. This will include moorings, area lighting, electricity and water.

A section of the Grand Canal, from the 34th Lock to the 35th Lock inclusive, will be closed to navigation between 1st November 2010 and 14th March 2011 to facilitate the improvement works. The towpaths will also be closed during the period of the works.

The design and commissioning of the work has been undertaken by Waterways Ireland. The tenders are currently being assessed and will be awarded shortly.

Published in Inland Waterways
Waterways Ireland celebrated the completion of the restoration of the Main Line of the Royal Canal on the inland waterways today. Celebrations began at 2pm in Richmond Harbour, Clondra, Co Longford. The official part of the event at 2pm involved the arrival of a flotilla of boats, short speeches, music and a reception This weekend there is a two day festival organised by the Clondra Branch of the Royal Canal Amenity Group.
Published in Inland Waterways
Waterways Ireland has issued a notice tu users of the Grand Canal on the inland waterways that a section of the canal, extending from the 34th Lock to the 35th Lock inclusive, will be closed to navigation between 1st November 2010 and 14th March 2011 to facilitate the following improvement works to the Shannon Harbour area:

PROVISION OF HOUSE BOAT BERTHING AREA

The works site will extend from Griffith Bridge for approximately 350m eastwards of the bridge. Temporary dams will be constructed in the vicinity of this site. Due to low and/or possibly fluctuating water levels between the site and the 34th Lock, it is strongly advised that boats should not be moored between the site and the 34th Lock. Adequate berthage is available East of the 34th Lock. There will be no pedestrian or vehicular access through the work site. Pedestrian and vehicular entry/exit access will be via the south canal bank at L'Estrange Bridge for the duration of the works.

TRANS-SHIPMENT SHED CANOPY REMOVAL AND ASSOCIATED REMEDIAL WORKS
These works will extend for a period of approximately six weeks from November 1st 2010. Boats will not be permitted to moor in the vicinity of the work site during this period. The work site will extend from the 35th Lock for approximately 125m Eastwards, to a point approximately 15m beyond the Eastern gable of the trans-shipment shed. There will be no vessel mooring in the vicinity of the work site. There will be no pedestrian or vehicular access along the northerly canal bank from Griffith Bridge towards the 35th and 36th Locks for the site work duration.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland in conjunction with a working committee will mark the completion of the main line of the Royal Canal on the inland waterways with an event that will take place in Richmond Harbour, Clondra, Co. Longford on the 1st October as part of a weekend of festivities. This event is the culmination of not only 36 years of campaigning by the Royal Canal Amenity Group (RCAG) but a summer of waterside events moving East to West; boaters and waterside communities have been celebrating the reawakening of the Royal Canal each weekend leading up to the main event.

The formal event will take place on October 1st at 2pm, with a flotilla of boats arriving into Richmond Harbour. The flotilla will include boats from each branch of the RCAG as well as the Heritage Boat Association, Inland Waterways Association of Ireland, the supporters of the Canal d'Nivernais, representatives of the Wilderness Boats. The flotilla will be lead by Royal Canal Barge no 3 (also known as the Killucan Barge). The formal event will be followed by a weekend of celebrations organised by the Clondra Branch of the RCAG and supported by Waterways Ireland. The weekend festivities are open to all.

The Royal Canal is a highly significant and historic public amenity. 145.6km long, the Royal Canal stretches from Dublin to the Shannon passing through Dublin, Kildare, Meath, Westmeath and Longford. 1.2 million people live within this catchment making the Royal Canal one of the largest public amenities on the island.

Published in Inland Waterways
The Grand Canal in Tullamore on Ireland's inland waterways will be closed at Cox's Bridge (near the 27th lock) from Monday, 1st November 2010 to Monday, 1st March 2011 to facilitate bridge repairs by National Roads Authority. 
Published in Inland Waterways
Waterways Ireland has advised that technical difficulties are presently preventing the Portumna bridge on the Shannon navigation on the inland waterways from opening and closing correctly. Corrective action is being taken to rectify the problem. Any master planning a voyage on this stretch of the navigation should first contact the Bridge Keeper on 090-9741011 for the most recent information.
Published in Inland Waterways
Page 48 of 51

Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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