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Displaying items by tag: lighthouses

#BailyTalks - In association with Engineers Week, a talk about the history and development in the lights at the Baily lighthouse, will be held in front of the historic Baily optic which today holds centre stage at the National Maritime Museum, Dun Laoghaire.

Nigel Teggin, Engineer with the Commissioners of Irish Lights, will present the lectures between 3-4pm on Tuesday (11th), Thursday (13th). and Saturday 15th February respectively.

Booking is not required though there is admission fee to the museum located in the former Mariners Church on Haigh Terrace, close to the Royal Marine Hotel.

For further details contact, Linda Carroll of the museum Tel: (01)2143964 or email: [email protected]

 

Published in Lighthouses

#Lighthouses - Six lighthouses around the Irish coast were damaged by this week's stormy weather but remained operational, as The Irish Times reports.

The Commissioners of Irish Lights has since begun an aerial inspection of the coastline from Tuskar Rock off Wexford to Inishtrahull in Donegal to assess the extend of structural damage as hurricane-strength winds and massive surf assaulted the island of Ireland.

Worst affected as the lighthouse on Inis Oírr in the Aran Islands, where windows were blown in and a perimeter wall was collapsed.

Meanwhile, an approach light on Inishbofin off Connemara that was blown away in the storms will be replaced by a temporary battery-operated lantern.

The extreme conditions are also thought to be responsible for two fatal dolphin strandings in the Galway region, in Salthill close to the city and Roundstone in western Connemara.

The Irish Times has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Lighthouses
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#LighthouseTrail - As previously reported last week the first ever All Ireland Lighthouse Trail was jointly launched by ministers from north and south at Blackrock Lighthouse, Co. Antrim, one of five lighthouses selected for development along the northern coastline.

The All Island Lighthouse Trail project, led by the Commissioners of Irish Lights (CIL), will see these five operational lighthouses also made available for specialist tourism accommodation and attractions. The project has the support of the European Union INTERREG IVA with funding of €2.5million for tourism and job creation.

To see the location of the lighthouses (including technical information) click CIL's aids to navigation-lighthouse-map. The lighthouses are Blackrock Lighthouse, Rathlin West off Co. Antrim and  St John's Point, Co. Down. The remaining lighthouses are both in Co.Donegal, one on Fanad Head and the other lighthouse also named St. John's Point is located near Killybegs.

 

Published in Lighthouses

#Lighthouses – As previously reported, the first ever All-Ireland Lighthouse Tourism Trail project is being lead by the Commissioners for Irish Lights (CIL).

The project will see key facilities for accommodation and attractions made available along the northern coastline.
As well as creating jobs, the €2.5m project will help boost the local tourism industry.

The project, funded by the Special EU Programmes Body, will see 60 jobs supported during the construction period and 10 new jobs created when the facilities become operational.

The lighthouses earmarked for the project include Rathlin West, Blackhead on the Antrim coast, St John's Point in County Down, Fanad Head in County Donegal and another St John's Point again in County Donegal. For more on this lighthouse trail project, u.tv/news has a report.

 

Published in Lighthouses

#HookLighthouse – Hook Head Lighthouse which is run by Hook Heritage is in conjunction with the Commissioners of Irish Lights (CIL) delighted to announce their flagship Gathering Event to be held in September.

An exciting weekend is to take place between 13-15 September at the oldest operational lighthouse in the world on the sunny Hook Peninsula in Co. Wexford.

On offer during the three-days there will be a Lighthouse Symposium with guest speakers from all over the world to dinner and dancing, music, free family fun, a magical fireworks display and more.

Irish Lights are to catalogue and document stories from old and preserve the heritage that makes our shores so rich in history.

For further details about the special celebratory Gathering visit this LINK (scroll down for events programme). In addition to finding out more about the work of Ireland's aids to navigations service visit the Irish Lights homepage.

 

Published in Lighthouses

#UKMetOfficeBuoy – The Commissioners of Irish Lights tender ILV Granuaile (2000/2,625grt) successfully deployed a KI buoy recently for the UK's Met Office.

The positioning of the deep-water mooring buoy took place some 250 miles west of the French port of Brest in Brittany.

The Romanian built / Dutch outfitted Granuaile, has previously carried out maintenance visits on the K1 buoy, this was the first time a completely new set of moorings was deployed.

The extreme length of the cable introduced new and potentially hazardous challenges to the ships personnel.

In total almost 2,500 meters of a mixture of rope and chain moorings were deployed in depths of 1,500 m.

The successful deployment of the deep-water mooring proved how versatile and innovative the Granuaile is and that of her crew when faced with tough new offshore challenges.

 

Published in Lighthouses

On Sunday the 2nd of June the Valentia Island Lighthouse will be officially open to the public for the first time. The project will put this heritage site in the hands of the community with a long term lease to manage the project as a tourist attraction. Initially the public will be offered guided tours into the lighthouse tower and balcony.

A marketing and fundraising plan is being put in place to develop the site over the next couple of years to make this a high quality tourist attraction and it is expected that this will attract 40-50,000 visitors a year to Valentia. Future plans include the conversion of the Lighthouse Keeper's house as a visitor centre and the development of the archaeological potential at Cromwell Fort.

Brian Morgan from the Valentia Island Development Committee said "The site on Valentia has huge tourism potential and will provide a much needed boost to the local economy".

"As well as local land owners the Kerry County Council has provided terrific help from the beginning and are strongly supporting this project as a key tourism project for the county" he added.

Cromwell Point Lighthouse is maintained by the Commissioners of Irish Lights and is a harbour light to guide vessels from the sea and lead them through the northern entrance of Valentia Harbour past Harbour Rock.

The site of the Cromwell Point Lighthouse was originally home to a Cromwell Feetwood Fort believed to have been built in the 16th century which was one of two built on Valentia Island around this time. The outline of the Cromwell Point fort with its bastions and barrack inside its wall can still be easily traced from the air, lying just inside the lighthouse enclosure wall. The fort was maintained after the Restoration and there are various State Paper entries about its repair over the period 1663-1665. It was disestablished in 1669. The first light for Cromwell Point was originally applied for on 30 March 1828 by the Right Honorary Maurice Fitzgerald, Knight of Kerry. Work commenced on the lighthouse ten years later in 1838, the light was first exhibited on 1 February 1841. Since November 1947 the light has been automated.

An official opening of the lighthouse will take place during the June weekend to coincide with the Transatlantic Communications and Light Gathering. One of the other highlights of the weekend will be the attendance of Professor Alexander Gillespie who will discuss the importance of Valentia's link to the Transatlantic Cable and the opportunity to explore the International heritage significance of the Cable Station. Professor Gillespie is the first New Zealander to be named Rapporteur for the World Heritage Convention. This is an event that will celebrate the island's rich heritage with the Transatlantic Cable and communications will be a major theme over the weekend. All three communications elements on the Island; the cable station, the radio station, and the lighthouse will be explored through a series of insightful and interesting lectures. There will also be the opportunity to take various tours of these significant sites. As well as soaking up the traditional island welcome and some great live music this weekend will afford you the opportunity to mingle in the company of friends old and new. 'We aim to celebrate with the wider community, to reunite the family descendants' who were part of that glorious age, and also tell the world that Valentia is ready to once again take its rightful place as a centre for heritage preservation and communications innovation' said Anthony O'Connell Chairman of the Valentia Island Development Committee.

For more information on this exciting event visit www.valentiawelcomestheworld.com or call Valentia Island Tourist Office on +353 (66) 9476985 or email [email protected]

Published in Lighthouses
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#Lighthouse - German journalists were recently taken on a tour of Loop Head Lighthouse to give our European neighbours a taste of Ireland's maritime heritage.

The group - including writers from the likes of respected news magazine Der Spiegel - visited the 19th-century landmark in Co Clare which opened to visitors at weekends earlier this month, and will be open seven days a week from the June Bank Holiday over the summer season for the third year running.

Before then, it will welcome visitors during the National Famine Commemoration programme from 3-12 May.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the lighthouse at the mouth of the Shannon Estuary has proven a major tourism draw, with its 11-week trial opening in 2011 estimated to be worth €400,000 to the local economy.

Published in Lighthouses

#LighthouseTender- ILV Granuaile the aids to navigation tender is carrying out another trial run of systems at sea today in Dublin Bay and off Greystones, writes Jehan Ashmore.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the Commissioners of Irish Lights 79m tender had undergone work that has involved the installation of a new radar mast, calorifier units and modifications to the bridge.

Arklow Marine Services carried out the work while the vessel was berthed in the port along Sir John Rogersons Quay.

The 2,625 tonnes buoy-handling vessel is expected to return to her homeport of Dun Laoghaire Harbour tonight.

 

Published in Lighthouses

#Lecture – The next Howth Peninsula Heritage Society lecture will be about 'The Lighthouses of the South West Coast.

The lecture to be presented by Gerry Butler is to takes place in the Howth Angling Centre along the West Pier, on Tuesday 26 March starting at 8 pm.

Those arriving by train only have a short stroll to the venue from Howth DART station.

All are welcome to the lecture which is admission free to members and to non-members €4 payable at the door.

 

Published in Boating Fixtures
Page 5 of 7

Ferry & Car Ferry News The ferry industry on the Irish Sea, is just like any other sector of the shipping industry, in that it is made up of a myriad of ship operators, owners, managers, charterers all contributing to providing a network of routes carried out by a variety of ships designed for different albeit similar purposes.

All this ferry activity involves conventional ferry tonnage, 'ro-pax', where the vessel's primary design is to carry more freight capacity rather than passengers. This is in some cases though, is in complete variance to the fast ferry craft where they carry many more passengers and charging a premium.

In reporting the ferry scene, we examine the constantly changing trends of this sector, as rival ferry operators are competing in an intensive environment, battling out for market share following the fallout of the economic crisis. All this has consequences some immediately felt, while at times, the effects can be drawn out over time, leading to the expense of others, through reduced competition or takeover or even face complete removal from the marketplace, as witnessed in recent years.

Arising from these challenging times, there are of course winners and losers, as exemplified in the trend to run high-speed ferry craft only during the peak-season summer months and on shorter distance routes. In addition, where fastcraft had once dominated the ferry scene, during the heady days from the mid-90's onwards, they have been replaced by recent newcomers in the form of the 'fast ferry' and with increased levels of luxury, yet seeming to form as a cost-effective alternative.

Irish Sea Ferry Routes

Irrespective of the type of vessel deployed on Irish Sea routes (between 2-9 hours), it is the ferry companies that keep the wheels of industry moving as freight vehicles literally (roll-on and roll-off) ships coupled with motoring tourists and the humble 'foot' passenger transported 363 days a year.

As such the exclusive freight-only operators provide important trading routes between Ireland and the UK, where the freight haulage customer is 'king' to generating year-round revenue to the ferry operator. However, custom built tonnage entering service in recent years has exceeded the level of capacity of the Irish Sea in certain quarters of the freight market.

A prime example of the necessity for trade in which we consumers often expect daily, though arguably question how it reached our shores, is the delivery of just in time perishable products to fill our supermarket shelves.

A visual manifestation of this is the arrival every morning and evening into our main ports, where a combination of ferries, ro-pax vessels and fast-craft all descend at the same time. In essence this a marine version to our road-based rush hour traffic going in and out along the commuter belts.

Across the Celtic Sea, the ferry scene coverage is also about those overnight direct ferry routes from Ireland connecting the north-western French ports in Brittany and Normandy.

Due to the seasonality of these routes to Europe, the ferry scene may be in the majority running between February to November, however by no means does this lessen operator competition.

Noting there have been plans over the years to run a direct Irish –Iberian ferry service, which would open up existing and develop new freight markets. Should a direct service open, it would bring new opportunities also for holidaymakers, where Spain is the most visited country in the EU visited by Irish holidaymakers ... heading for the sun!

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