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Displaying items by tag: Kilmore Quay

In a joint operation, Rosslare Harbour and Kilmore Quay RNLI in Co Wexford came to the aid of a lone sailor early on Tuesday morning (4 June) after an 8.5m yacht got into difficulty.

The volunteer crews were requested to launch their all-weather lifeboats by the Irish Coast Guard following a report from the sailor that their yacht had developed engine failure.

Rosslare Harbour’s all-weather lifeboat was launched at 7.20am under coxswain Eamonn O’Rourke and with six crew members onboard, and the crew made their way to the scene one mile south-east of Carnsore Point.

Arriving on scene, the crew assessed the situation and with the vessel found to be without power and drifting, it was decided to establish a tow in order to bring the sailor to safety.

The yacht was then towed towards the nearest safe port at Kilmore Quay, where the Kilmore Quay lifeboat crew took charge and towed the yacht to safety at 9.55am.

Speaking following the call-out, Jamie Ryan, Rosslare Harbour RNLI’s lifeboat operations manager said: “We would like to commend the sailor for raising the alarm when they knew they were in difficulty. That is always the right thing to do and we wish them well.

“We also want to thank our colleagues from Kilmore Quay who completed the call-out and brought the sailor safely to shore. This was a good example of an effective joint operation with our flanking lifeboat station.

“As we approach the summer months, we encourage anyone planning a trip or activity at sea to always go prepared. Check weather and tides before venturing out, carry the right equipment for a safe journey including a means of communication. Always wear a lifejacket or suitable flotation device for your activity. Should you get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Kilmore Quay RNLI launched on Friday afternoon (19 April) to assist five people aboard an angling charter boat southeast of the Saltee Islands when rope had become entangled in the propeller.

A number of the responding volunteer lifeboat crew left family confirmation celebrations to answer the call.

The all-weather Tamar class relief lifeboat Victor Freeman was requested to launch by the Irish Coast Guard at 1pm and it left the station, under the command of coxswain Trevor Devereux with four crew members on board, arriving on scene at 1.30pm.

Having checked all on board were safe and well, the lifeboat crew decided that the safest course of action was to establish a tow.

The lifeboat was soon under way with the casualty vessel to the nearest available harbour at Kilmore Quay, arriving at 2pm. Weather and sea conditions were described as good at the time.

The call-out came as four of the station’s lifeboat crew are currently on passage from Poole in Dorset to Kilmore Quay, bringing home the station’s permanent lifeboat Killarney which has recently undergone a major overhaul.

With a total of nine lifeboat crew from the Kilmore Quay crew active on lifeboats today, the station is renewing its call for interested people to consider becoming a volunteer at Kilmore Quay RNLI.

Speaking on the call-out, Kilmore Quay lifeboat operations manager John Grace said: “It was great to see all on board wearing lifejackets and having followed the correct procedures when they got snagged. Stray ropes or nets floating in the water can be a hazard to any vessel in this way.”

Grace went on to praise the lifeboat crew and encourage those interested to find out more about becoming a volunteer with the lifeboat station.

“We are lucky to have a dedicated volunteer crew here in Kilmore Quay to respond to call-outs,” he said. “Today some left a family occasion to go and help others in need. It’s a selflessness and community spirit that we have here in our volunteers, and we’d welcome more people through the door to carry out this important work.

“Anyone interested is welcome to come and talk to us and training is given. There is so much to get out of volunteering for the RNLI.”

The Kilmore Quay RNLI lifeboat crew involved in the call-out were coxswain Trevor Devereux, mechanic Declan Roche, Adam Kelly, Robbie Connolly and Jack Devereux.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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RNLI lifeboats from Ireland and the UK launched to a Mayday distress call from a fishing vessel taking on water on Friday (8 March).

The 24-metre Irish trawler had five crew onboard and was some 21 nautical miles northwest of Strumble Head near Fishguard in south Wales when HM Coastguard tasked the charity's Welsh lifeboats just before midday.

The all-weather lifeboats and volunteer crew from St Davids, Fishguard, Newquay made best speed to the scene.

HM Coastguard’s search and rescue helicopter R936 from Caernarfon also tasked to assist and was first to arrive on scene, lowering a water pump to the vessel.

With no casualties reported, Newquay lifeboat was stood down en route. St Davids’ Tamar class lifeboat Norah Wortley arrived at 1.10pm with sea conditions rough in a Force 5-7 easterly wind. Fishguard RNLI’s Trent class lifeboat Blue Peter VII arrived at 1.35pm.

With no engine damage and the coastguard pump sufficiently reducing the water level, it was decided the fishing vessel would be escorted the 35 nautical miles west to Ireland.

St Davids RNLI escorting the trawler as Kilmore Quay lifeboat arrives | Credit: RNLI/St DavidsSt Davids RNLI escorting the trawler as Kilmore Quay lifeboat arrives | Credit: RNLI/St Davids

Kilmore Quay RNLI’s Tamar class lifeboat Victor Freeman was tasked by the Irish Coast Guard to complete the escort and launched at 2.10pm. At this point, the Fishguard lifeboat was stood down and returned to Wales.

St Davids RNLI escorted the trawler a further 20 nautical miles west-southwest towards Tuskar Rock until the Kilmore Quay lifeboat arrived at 3.20pm and took over the escort, getting the vessel safely into port around 6pm.

Will Chant, RNLI coxswain for St Davids RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat said: “This rescue was a good, fast response from all crews, which with an incident of this nature was exactly what was required.

“Fortunately the salvage pump from the helicopter was all that was required in order to quell the problems on board the trawler, and after that it was a straightforward but long job of escorting the vessel to safety.

“Our crew even received ‘welcome to Ireland’ messages on their mobile phones, such was the distance from home.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Kilmore Quay RNLI volunteers were called out on two separate occasions on Monday, September 11, to assist two yachts in distress.

The first call came in early in the morning when the crew launched to help two people on board a yacht with a fouled prop approximately two miles south of Carnsore Point. The lifeboat arrived on scene at 8:10 am, and after assessing the situation, the crew towed the yacht back to Kilmore Quay. The vessel arrived back at the harbour at 9:30 am.

Later in the day, the crew received another call for assistance. This time, they were asked to help a lone sailor whose yacht had lost all power near the Saltee Islands. The lifeboat was launched at 2:30 pm and arrived on scene ten minutes later. After assessing the situation, the crew transferred an RNLI crew member to the yacht to establish a towline.

The vessel was towed back to Kilmore Quay harbour, arriving at 3:20 pm where they were met by an ambulance as a precaution.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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A fundraising exhibition in aid of Co. Wexford’s five RNLI lifeboat stations will share in the proceeds from the event held in the Stella Maris Centre in Kilmore Quay on Saturday 26 and Sunday, 27 August.

The exhibition 'A Maritime History of Co. Wexford' will be hosted by Rosslare Harbour Maritime Heritage Centre and will feature displays from the maritime heritage centre. Also on display will be the John Power Collection with other contributors from around the county.

Admission to the exhibition in Kilmore Quay is free of charge and will be open on both days 11 a.m to 5.30 p.m.

People are asked to make donations during their visits while local businesses and groups are also being encouraged to support the RNLI fundraiser.

The fundraiser is to benefit the county’s two offshore lifeboats stationed at Rosslare Harbour and Kilmore Quay and three inshore lifeboats located at Courtown Harbour, Wexford and Fethard-on-Sea.

The exhibition will span a period of 200 years through artefacts, photographs, paintings, drawings and models of sailing ships, steamers and of course the lifeboats.

More from the Wexford People on the fundraiser which is also to feature the development of the Port of New Ross along with the building  of the replica of Dunbrody which was built on the banks of the Barrow in 1998.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

On Saturday afternoon, Kilmore Quay RNLI came to the rescue of three people stranded on a RIB off Ballyhealy Beach. The all-weather Tamar class lifeboat, Killarney, was launched after the Irish Coast Guard received a call from a concerned member of the public. The RIB was anchored approximately 100 meters off the beach, and the weather was sunny but with a strong southwesterly breeze blowing at Force 6 to 7, causing large waves to form close to the shore.

The lifeboat arrived on the scene at 3:30 pm and quickly established that the three people on board were safe and well. They were transferred to the lifeboat for passage back to Kilmore Quay, and a towline was established to the RIB. The lifeboat set off for Kilmore Quay and arrived back in the harbour at 4:50 pm. The casualty vessel was secured alongside the marina by the Kilmore Quay unit of the Irish Coast Guard, who also took care of the three casualties when they disembarked from the lifeboat. The lifeboat was made ready for service again by the crew.

Kilmore Quay RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager John Grace expressed gratitude that the outcome was good and urged anyone heading out to sea to tell someone where they are going and when they will be back. He also emphasised the importance of carrying a reliable means of communication, such as a VHF or a mobile phone in a waterproof case, in case of an emergency. Grace thanked the Kilmore Quay Coast Guard unit for their assistance during the rescue operation.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Rosslare Harbour and Kilmore Quay RNLI, in a joint operation, came to the assistance of two people on board a yacht that was taking on water eight miles northeast of Rosslare Harbour on Thursday evening (13 July 2023)

The Rosslare Harbour RNLI volunteer crew were requested to launch their Severn class lifeboat Donald and Barbara Broadhead, by the Irish Coast Guard at 4.52 pm. The lifeboat under Coxswain Eamonn O’Rourke and with six crew members on board, launched at 5.10 pm, arriving on scene at 5.30pm. At the time, a Force 5 south westerly wind was blowing with moderate seas but with good visibility.

Having assessed the situation and in consultation with the yacht crew, two lifeboat crew boarded the casualty vessel with a bilge pump, preventing further flooding aboard the vessel. A tow was established at 5.40pm. However, given the inclement weather conditions at Rosslare Harbour, it was decided that it would be safer to bring the yacht to Kilmore Quay harbour.

Following a request by the Irish Coast Guard, the volunteer RNLI crew at Kilmore Quay, who at the time were taking part in the opening of the annual Kilmore Quay Seafood Festival, launched their all-weather Tamar class lifeboat, Killarney, arriving on scene at Carnsore Point at 8.15pm.

The crews worked together to transfer the tow to the second lifeboat relieving the Rosslare Harbour lifeboat and crew to return to base. Two members of the Kilmore Quay crew were transferred to the casualty vessel and the boats made their way back to Kilmore Quay arriving just after 10.00pm.

Speaking following the call out, Deputy Launch Authority, Tony Kehoe, said: ‘I would like to commend both crews on the successful outcome which was down to the excellent cooperation and teamwork between all involved. I would also like to commend the crew of the yacht for raising the alarm when they did, ensuring we got to them in time. It is vital to have proper means of communication such as VHF radio when heading out to sea as they did.’

The Rosslare Harbour Crew involved in the call out were Coxswain Eamonn O’Rourke, mechanic Mick Nicholas, crew members: Dave McCusker, Paul McCormack, Conor Barry, Keith Morris and Peter Carr.

The Kilmore Quay RNLI lifeboat crew involved in the call out were Coxswain Aidan Bates, mechanic Philip Walsh, crew members: Sean Furlong, Michelle Hinchy, Mark Power, Tom Lambert and Michael Roche.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Kilmore Quay RNLI volunteer crew were called late on Saturday night to assist a yacht with four people on board that had lost power at sea, having also launched in the afternoon to reports of four swimmers in difficulty at a local beach.

The crew were requested to launch their all-weather Tamar class lifeboat Killarney, by the Irish Coast Guard at 3.40 pm on Saturday, 24 June, to reports of four swimmers in difficulty at Ballyteige Burrow beach, west of Kilmore Quay harbour.

Two friends went swimming from the beach and found themselves unable to swim back to shore. Back ashore, their friends noticed they were in difficulty and rang the Irish Coast Guard to raise the alarm, while another took the ring buoy from the beach and swam out to assist the pair in difficulty.

The lifeboat under Coxswain Eugene Kehoe immediately launched and made its way to the scene. Meanwhile, another swimmer and a kayaker, also seeing the pair in difficulty, had made their way to the pair to lend assistance. A small boat that was nearby had also arrived on scene and recovered three of the swimmers, who were then transferred to the lifeboat. The fourth swimmer was recovered by the Y-boat launched from the lifeboat. On return to Kilmore Quay Harbour, the lifeboat was met by the Kilmore Quay Irish Coast Guard unit and a paramedic. One of the swimmers had swallowed some seawater and was taken to hospital as a precaution by the Irish Coast Guard Helicopter Rescue 117.

At 11:09 pm Saturday night, the Irish Coast Guard requested the volunteer crew to respond to a Pan Pan call to assist four people aboard a yacht that had lost all power. The lifeboat, under Coxswain Eugene Kehoe with six crew members on board, immediately launched and made its way to the 12m yacht situated 18 miles southeast of Kilmore Quay. Conditions at the time were drizzly with poor visibility, light southeasterly winds and a slight sea swell.

Arriving on scene approximately one hour later, the lifeboat crew checked that all on board the yacht was safe and well before assessing the situation with the vessel. A decision was made to establish a towline and return to the nearest port, which was Kilmore Quay. The passage back to port with the vessel under tow took just over two and a half hours. Arriving back in the harbour at 2:53am, the casualty vessel was secured alongside the marina. The lifeboat returned to its berth and was made ready for service again by the crew.

Speaking following the call outs, Kilmore Quay RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager John Grace, said: ‘'Thankfully both call outs had a happy ending. The young people at the beach did the right thing in raising the alarm when they noticed their friends in trouble, which helped to prevent the situation from becoming much worse. Always remember when you see someone in trouble call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard. “

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Kilmore Quay RNLI crew members Michelle Hinchy and Trevor Devereux took a rare day off from the pager yesterday for a special reason. The couple switched their lifejackets and yellow wellies for wedding day finery to marry in a beautiful ceremony surrounded by family and friends.

However, the day could not pass without a stop at the lifeboat station and some photos with Kilmore Quay’s Tamar class all-weather lifeboat, Killarney. Between them the bride and groom have over 50 years voluntary service with Kilmore Quay RNLI. Michelle, currently the station’s only female crew member, is also training to become a lifeboat navigator. Trevor is a qualified lifeboat Coxswain and mechanic, and alongside his volunteering duties, recently took up the role of Regional Resilience Coxswain Mechanic working at other lifeboat stations when needed.

Speaking following their wedding, Michelle said: ‘We had a wonderful day. The RNLI is a huge part of our lives, and it was odd not to be carrying a pager today but fantastic to celebrate with all our family, friends and especially our RNLI family, some that had travelled from far and wide to be here.’

Members of the station team were delighted to join the happy couple on their special day and the whole crew extend their best wishes to Trevor and Michelle for continued happiness in their life together.

John Grace, Kilmore Quay RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager, said: ‘Michelle and Trevor are very much a part of our RNLI family here in Kilmore Quay. All of us at the station send them our congratulations and wish them fair winds and following seas.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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Kilmore Quay RNLI responded to two separate requests from the Irish Coast Guard for assistance with pleasure craft in the vicinity of the Saltee Islands over the weekend.

The volunteer crew were requested to launch their all-weather Tamar class lifeboat Killarney, by the Irish Coast Guard at 2.00 pm on Saturday to assist a rigid inflatable boat (R.I.B.) with five people on board that had lost steering. The lifeboat launched at 2:18 pm and made its way to the south side of the Great Saltee, where the crew of the R.I.B. had managed to tie on to a buoy and await assistance. All on board were safe and well. The lifeboat crew established a towline and brought the boat back to Kilmore Quay, arriving at 3.12 pm.

At 5.30 pm on Sunday evening, the crew responded to a request from the Irish Coast Guard to assist a lone sailor on an 8m yacht approximately six nautical miles southeast of Kilmore Quay. The yacht had experienced a navigation system failure. Arriving on the scene at 6.00 pm and after checking the person onboard was safe and well, a towline was established.

The yacht was brought back to Kilmore Quay harbour arriving at 7.25 pm.

The weather and sea conditions were good on both occasions.

Speaking following both callouts, Kilmore Quay RNLI Coxswain, Eugene Kehoe, said: ‘Even the best-maintained equipment can sometimes go wrong, so it is important always to be prepared for when it does happen as these people were. They did the right thing in calling for help when they did. I would urge anyone heading out to sea always carry a reliable means of communication, VHF, or a mobile phone in a waterproof case in case you need to call for help and always wear a lifejacket. If you do get into difficulty or see someone else in trouble, dial 999 or 112 and ask for the Coast Guard.’

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Aquaculture Information

Aquaculture is the farming of animals in the water and has been practised for centuries, with the monks farming fish in the middle ages. More recently the technology has progressed and the aquaculture sector is now producing in the region of 50 thousand tonnes annually and provides a valuable food product as well as much needed employment in many rural areas of Ireland.

A typical fish farm involves keeping fish in pens in the water column, caring for them and supplying them with food so they grow to market size. Or for shellfish, containing them in a specialised unit and allowing them to feed on natural plants and materials in the water column until they reach harvestable size. While farming fish has a lower carbon and water footprint to those of land animals, and a very efficient food fed to weight gain ratio compared to beef, pork or chicken, farming does require protein food sources and produces organic waste which is released into the surrounding waters. Finding sustainable food sources, and reducing the environmental impacts are key challenges facing the sector as it continues to grow.

Salmon is the most popular fish bought by Irish families. In Ireland, most of our salmon is farmed, and along with mussels and oysters, are the main farmed species in the country.

Aquaculture in Ireland

  • Fish and shellfish are farmed in 14 Irish coastal counties.
  • Irish SMEs and families grow salmon, oysters, mussels and other seafood
  • The sector is worth €150m at the farm gate – 80% in export earnings.
  • The industry sustains 1,833 direct jobs in remote rural areas – 80% in the west of Ireland
  • Every full-time job in aquaculture creates 2.27 other jobs locally (Teagasc 2015)
  • Ireland’s marine farms occupy 0.0004% of Ireland’s 17,500Km2 inshore area.
  • 83% of people in coastal areas support the development of fish farming
  • Aquaculture is a strong, sustainable and popular strategic asset for development and job creation (Foodwise 2025, National Strategic Plan, Seafood
  • Operational Programme 2020, FAO, European Commission, European Investment Bank, Harvesting Our Ocean Wealth, Silicon Republic, CEDRA)
    Ireland has led the world in organically certified farmed fish for over 30 years
  • Fish farm workers include people who have spent over two decades in the business to school-leavers intent on becoming third-generation farmers on their family sites.

Irish Aquaculture FAQs

Aquaculture, also known as aquafarming, is the farming of aquatic organisms such as fish, crustaceans, molluscs and aquatic plants, and involves cultivating freshwater and saltwater populations under controlled conditions- in contrast to commercial fishing, which is the harvesting of wild fish. Mariculture refers to aquaculture practiced in marine environments and in underwater habitats. Particular kinds of aquaculture include fish farming, shrimp farming, oyster farming, mariculture, algaculture (such as seaweed farming), and the cultivation of ornamental fish. Particular methods include aquaponics and integrated multi-trophic aquaculture, both of which integrate fish farming and plant farming.

About 580 aquatic species are currently farmed all over the world, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), which says it is "practised by both some of the poorest farmers in developing countries and by multinational companies".

Increasing global demand for protein through seafood is driving increasing demand for aquaculture, particularly given the pressures on certain commercially caught wild stocks of fish. The FAO says that "eating fish is part of the cultural tradition of many people and in terms of health benefits, it has an excellent nutritional profile, and "is a good source of protein, fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and essential micronutrients".

Aquaculture now accounts for 50 per cent of the world's fish consumed for food, and is the fastest-growing good sector.

China provides over 60 per cent of the world's farmed fish. In Europe, Norway and Scotland are leading producers of finfish, principally farmed salmon.

For farmed salmon, the feed conversion ratio, which is the measurement of how much feed it takes to produce the protein, is 1.1, as in one pound of feed producing one pound of protein, compared to rates of between 2.2 and 10 for beef, pork and chicken. However, scientists have also pointed out that certain farmed fish and shrimp requiring higher levels of protein and calories in feed compared to chickens, pigs, and cattle.

Tilapia farming which originated in the Middle East and Africa has now become the most profitable business in most countries. Tilapia has become the second most popular seafood after crab, due to which its farming is flourishing. It has entered the list of best selling species like shrimp and salmon.

There are 278 aquaculture production units in Ireland, according to Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) *, producing 38,000 tonnes of finfish and shellfish in 2019 and with a total value of €172 million

There are currently almost 2,000 people directly employed in Irish aquaculture in the Republic, according to BIM.

BIM figures for 2019 recorded farmed salmon at almost 12,000 tonnes, valued at €110 million; rock oysters reached 10,300 tonnes at a value of €44 million; rope mussels at 10,600 tonnes were valued at €7 million; seabed cultured mussels at 4,600 tonnes were valued at €7 million; "other" finfish reached 600 tonnes, valued at €2 million and "other" shellfish reached 300 tonnes, valued at €2 million

Irish aquaculture products are exported to Europe, US and Asia, with salmon exported to France, Germany, Belgium and the US. Oysters are exported to France, with developing sales to markets in Hong Kong and China. France is Ireland's largest export for mussels, while there have been increased sales in the domestic and British markets.

The value of the Irish farmed finfish sector fell by five per cent in volume and seven per cent in value in 2019, mainly due to a fall on salmon production, but this was partially offset by a seven per cent increased in farmed shellfish to a value of 60 million euro. Delays in issuing State licenses have hampered further growth of the sector, according to industry representatives.

Fish and shellfish farmers must be licensed, and must comply with regulations and inspections conducted by the Sea Fisheries Protection Authority and the Marine Institute. Food labelling is a function of the Food Safety Authority of Ireland. There is a long backlog of license approvals in the finfish sector, while the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine says it is working to reduce the backlog in the shellfish sector.

The department says it is working through the backlog, but notes that an application for a marine finfish aquaculture licence must be accompanied by either an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or an Environmental Impact Assessment Report (EIAR). As of October 2020, over two-thirds of applications on hand had an EIS outstanding, it said.

The EU requires member states to have marine spatial plans by 2021, and Ireland has assigned responsibility to the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government for the National Marine Planning Framework (NMPF). Legislation has been drawn up to underpin this, and to provide a "one stop shop" for marine planning, ranging from fish farms to offshore energy – as in Marine Planning and Development Management Bill. However, the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine confirmed last year that it intends to retain responsibility for aquaculture and sea-fisheries related development – meaning fish and shellfish farmers won't be able to avail of the "one stop shop" for marine planning.

Fish and shellfish health is a challenge, with naturally occurring blooms, jellyfish and the risk of disease. There are also issues with a perception that the sector causes environmental problems.

The industry has been on a steep learning curve, particularly in finfish farming, since it was hailed as a new future for Irish coastal communities from the 1970s – with the State's Electricity Supply Board being an early pioneer, and tobacco company Carrolls also becoming involved for a time. Nutrient build up, which occurs when there is a high density of fish in one area, waste production and its impact on depleting oxygen in water, creating algal blooms and "dead zones", and farmers' use of antibiotics to prevent disease have all been concerns, and anglers have also been worried about the impact of escaped farmed salmon on wild fish populations. Sea lice from salmon farmers were also blamed for declines in sea trout and wild salmon in Irish estuaries and rivers.

BIM says over 95% of all salmon farmed in Ireland are certified organic. Organically grown salmon are only fed a diet of sustainable organic feed. They are also raised in more spacious pens than traditional farmed salmon. The need to site locations for fish farms further out to sea, using more robust cages for weather, has been recognised by regulatory agencies. There is a move towards land-based aquaculture in Norway to reduce impact on local ecosystems. The industry says that antibiotic use is declining, and it says that "safe and effective vaccinations have since been developed for farmed fish and are now widely used". Many countries are now adopting a more sustainable approach to removing sea lice from salmon, using feeder fish such as wrasse and lumpsucker fish. Ireland's first lumpsucker hatchery was opened in 2015.

BIM says over 95% of all salmon farmed in Ireland are certified organic. Organically grown salmon are only fed a diet of sustainable organic feed. They are also raised in more spacious pens than traditional farmed salmon. The need to site locations for fish farms further out to sea, using more robust cages for weather, has been recognised by regulatory agencies. There is a move towards land-based aquaculture in Norway to reduce impact on local ecosystems. The industry says that antibiotic use is declining, and it says that "safe and effective vaccinations have since been developed for farmed fish and are now widely used". Many countries are now adopting a more sustainable approach to removing sea lice from salmon, using feeder fish such as wrasse and lumpsucker fish. Ireland's first lumpsucker hatchery was opened in 2015.

Yes, as it is considered to have better potential for controlling environmental impacts, but it is expensive. As of October 2020, the department was handling over 20 land-based aquaculture applications.

The Irish Farmers' Association has represented fish and shellfish farmers for many years, with its chief executive Richie Flynn, who died in 2018, tirelessly championing the sector. His successor, Teresa Morrissey, is an equally forceful advocate, having worked previously in the Marine Institute in providing regulatory advice on fish health matters, scientific research on emerging aquatic diseases and management of the National Reference Laboratory for crustacean diseases.

BIM provides training in the national vocational certificate in aquaculture at its National Fisheries College, Castletownbere, Co Cork. It also trains divers to work in the industry. The Institute of Technology Carlow has also developed a higher diploma in aqua business at its campus in Wexford, in collaboration with BIM and IFA Aquaculture, the representative association for fish and shellfish farming.

© Afloat 2020

At A Glance - Irish Aquaculture

  • Fish and shellfish are farmed in 14 Irish coastal counties
  • Salmon is the most popular fish bought by Irish families. 
  • In Ireland, most of our salmon is farmed, and along with mussels and oysters, are the main farmed species in the country.
  • The industry sustains 1,833 direct jobs in remote rural areas – 80% in the west of Ireland
  • Every full-time job in aquaculture creates 2.27 other jobs locally (Teagasc 2015)
  • Ireland’s marine farms occupy 0.0004% of Ireland’s 17,500Km2 inshore area.
  • 83% of people in coastal areas support the development of fish farming

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