Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Sculling Ladder

#ROWING: The challenges on the Cork Sculling Ladder gained some traction on Saturday after a week with postponements and withdrawals. Henrik Merz of Shandon had a busy week: he won on Thursday but was beaten on Saturday.

Results.

Tuesday 22.03.2016.

(4) Dan Begley  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (3) Jack Casey  -  UCC Rowing Club. Race postponed due to Casey not well. Begley informed. Race now on Thursday 24.03.2016 at 06.20pm..

Wednesday. 23.03.2016.

(5) Stephen O’Sullivan  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (3) Jack Casey  -  UCC Rowing Club.  Non race.

Casey (UCC Rowing Club) led well at  the half way stage from O’Sullivan (Shandon BC), but had to stop due to illness. Both scullers to re row at a later date.

Re row on Friday 25.03.2016 at 06.20pm or on Saturday 26.03.2016 at 08.20am.

Starter / Umpire : Finbarr Desmond / Kieran O’Sullivan.  

(FC)(72) Anne O’Farrell  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (69) Jennifer Crowley  -  Shandon Boat Club.  Postponed to Thursday 24.03.2016 at 06.10pm.

Thursday 24.03.2916.

 (19) Henrik Merz  -  Shandon Boat Club bt  (FC)(35) Brian O’Keeffe  -  Shandon Boat Club.  5 L.

(FC)(72) Anne O’Farrell  -  Cork Boat Club  bt (69) Jennifer Crowley  -  Shandon Boat Club.  5 L.

(4) Dan Begley  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (3) Jack Casey  -  UCC Rowing Club.   No race.  Casey ill.

 (29) Shane Crean  -  Lee Rowing Club bt  (40) Cian O’Sullivan  -  Cork Boat Club.  5 L.

Umpires :  Finbarr Desmond and Kieran Hughes.

                   (10) Liam O’Connell  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (7) Darragh Larkin  -  Lee Rowing Club.   ---------   O’Connell withdrew challenge  ----  cancelled.

                    (21) Cormac Corkery  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (18) Hugh Sutton  -  Lee Rowing Club.  ---------   Corkery withdrew challenge  ----  cancelled.

                    (13) Barry Connolly  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (8) Barry O’Flynn  -  Cork Boat Club.  ---------   Connolly withdrew challenge   -----   cancelled.    

Friday. 25.03.2016.

                   (FC)(107) Hannah Cummins  -  Lee Rowing Club  v  (82) Sophie Grey  -  Lee Rowing Club.  --- postponed until Saturday.

                   (59) Kieran White  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (57) Noel Carey  -  Shandon Boat Club.  Cancelled, White withdrew challenge.

                   (8) Barry O’Flynn  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (6) Sean Lonergan  -  Shandon Boat Club. Cancelled,  O’Flynn withdrew challenge. .

                   (4) Dan Begley  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (3) Jack Casey  -  UCC Rowing Club.  Cancelled.

Saturday 26.03.2016.

 (22) Evan Curtin  -  Cork Boat Club.  bt (16) David Higgins  -  Presentation College Rowing Club.   4L.

 (50) Conor Twohig  -  Cork Boat Club bt  (45) Patrick Kenneally  -  Presentation College Rowing Club.   1 1/4L.

 (25) Donal Smith  -  Shandon Boat Club bt   (20) Henrik Merz  -  Shandon Boat Club.  1 3/4L.                   

 (47) Tim Buckley  -  Lee Rowing Club bt  (48) David Cosgrave  -  Shandon Boat Club.  5L.

 (82) Sophie Grey  -  Lee Rowing Club bt  (FC) (107) Hannah Cummins  -  Lee Rowing Club.  5L.

 (10) Liam O’Connell  -  Cork Boat Club.  bt (11) Cathal Merz  -  Shandon Boat Club.  5L.

Starter / Umpires : Finbarr Desmond, Kieran O’Sullivan and Pat Hickey.

  

Challenges :

Sunday.

09.00am.  (FC)(91) Marie Kidney  -  Lee Rowing Club  v  (82) Sophie Grey  -  Lee Rowing Club.

09.10am.  (4) Dan Begley  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (1) Ronan Byrne  -  Shandon Boat Club.

Monday. 28.03.2016.

06.00pm.   (FC)(86) Claragh O’Sullivan  -  Cork Boat Club  v  winner of 09.00am race on Sun. 27.03.2016. {(FC)(91) Marie Kidney  - Lee RC  v (82) Sophie Grey  -  Lee RC.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The Cork Sculling Ladder 2015/2016 entered its final week with a raft of challenges. Saturday and Sunday featured three races on each day, and there are challenges fixed for each day until the close on Easter Sunday. The continuing trials at the National Rowing Centre has resulted in some changes of schedule.  

Results.

Saturday. 19.03.2016.

 (119) Emma Breen  -  Lee Rowing Club bt   (115) Neasa Coleman  -  Lee Rowing Club.     2L.

(131) Jennifer Forde  -  Shandon Boat Club. bt   (FC)(144) Robyn Smith  -  Lee Rowing Club.   5L.  

 (128) Aoife Coleman  -  Lee Rowing Club. bt   (127) Abbie Cummins  -  Lee Rowing Club.   Cummins did not finish – injury.

Starter / Umpire : Finbarr Desmond, Kieran O’Sullivan and Kieran Hughes.

Sunday. 20.03.2016.

 (56) Ross Cudmore  -  Cork Boat Club. bt   (50) Luke Guerin  -  Presentation College Rowing Club.    1½L.  

(78) Harry Scannell  -  Presentation College Rowing Club.  r/o.   (79) Eoin Power  -  Cork Boat Club.  

  

 (53) Tim Buckley  -  Lee Rowing Club.  bt  (46)  David Cosgrove  -  Shandon Boat Club.  4L.

Starter / umpire  :  Finbarr Desmond, Kieran O’Sullivan and Kieran Hughes.

Challenges

                           

                 

Monday 21.03.2016.

06.40pm. (59) Kieran White  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (57) Noel Carey  -  Shandon Boat Club.    

                   

Tuesday. 22.03.2016.

06.30pm.  (4) Dan Begley  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (3) Jack Casey  -  UCC Rowing Club.

                   (22) Evan Curtin  - Cork Boat Club  v  (16) David Higgins  -  Presentation College Rowing Club.   Time tbc.

                   (30) Conor McCarthy  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (28) Alan O’Keeffe  -  Presentation College Rowing Club.  Time tbc.

                   (49) Conor Twohig  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (45) Patrick Kenneally  -  Presentation College Rowing Club. Time tbc. 

Wednesday. 23.03.2016.

06.30pm.  (5) Stephen O’Sullivan  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (3) Jack Casey  -  UCC Rowing Club.

06.40pm.  (FC)(72) Anne O’Farrell  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (69) Jennifer Crowley  -  Shandon Boat Club.  tbc,

Thursday 24.03.2916.

06.30pm.  (40) Cian O’Sullivan  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (29) Shane Crean  -  Lee Rowing Club.

06.40pm.  (10) Liam O’Connell  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (7) Darragh Larkin  -  Lee Rowing Club.

06.50pm.  (21) Cormac Corkery  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (18) Hugh Sutton  -  Lee Rowing Club.

07.00pm.  (13) Barry Connolly  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (8) Barry O’Flynn  -  Cork Boat Club.  Time tbc.

07.10pm.  (FC)(14) Fergal O’Sullivan  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (5) Stephen O’Sullivan  -  Shandon Boat Club.  Time tbc.

    

Friday. 25.03.2016.

09.00am.  (FC)(107) Hannah Cummins  -  Lee Rowing Club  v  (82) Sophie Grey  -  Lee Rowing Club.

Evening.    (8) Barry O’Flynn  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (6) Sean Lonergan  -  Shandon Boat Club.  Race and time tbc.

Saturday 26.03.2016.

08.50am. (47) David Cosgrave  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (46) Tim Buckley  -  Lee Rowing Club.  tbc.

09.00am.  (FC)(86) Claragh O’Sullivan  -  Cork Boat Club v winner of Fri. 25.03.2016 race.{(107) H. Cummins  -   Lee RC  v (82) S. Grey  -  Lee RC.}

09.10am.  (11) Cathal Merz  -  Shandon Boat club  v  (10) Liam O’Connell  -  Cork Boat Club.

                   (25) Donal smith  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (19) Henrik Merz  -  Shandon Boat Club.  Time tbc.

Sunday. 27.03.2016.  ( last day of the 2015 – 2016 Cork Sculling ladder ).

(FC)(91) Marie Kidney  -  Lee Rowing Club  v  (82) Sophie Grey  -  Lee Rowing Club.

Notes :

Rescheduled race timetable. 

This due to some of the ladder competitors still involved at the camp at the National Rowing Centre.

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

#Rowing: Alan O’Keeffe of Presentation College had less than a length to spare over Conor McCarthy of Cork Boat Club in one of the two Cork Sculling Ladder challenges held at the weekend. Kieran White of Cork beat Jack O’Donovan in the other race. The Ladder continues until Sunday, March 28th

Cork Sculling Ladder Challenges, Saturday, March 5th.

Race 1.   (29) Alan O’Keeffe,  Presentation College Rowing Club bt  (31) Conor McCarthy,  Cork Boat Club  4 feet.

Race 2.   (46) Patrick Kennelly,  Presentation College Rowing Club  r/o.   (50) Conor Twohig  -  Cork Boat Club.  Did not race. Ill.

Race 3.   (77) Kieran White,  Cork Boat Club bt (60) Jack O’Donovan,  Presentation College Rowing Club  5 lengths.

Challenges :

Sunday, March 13th 

09.00am.  (41) Cian O’Sullivan  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (33) Eoin Gaffney  -  Shandon Boat Club.

Date and times to be arranged for the following :

(8) Barry O’Flynn  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (6) Sean Lonergan  -  Shandon Boat Club.

(12) Liam O’Connell  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (10) Cathal Merz  -  Shandon Boat Club.

(13) Barry Connolly  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (11) Thomas Murphy  -  Lee Rowing Club.

(21) Cormac Corkery  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (18) Hugh Sutton  -  Lee Rowing Club.

(23) Evan Curtin  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (22) Luke Guerin  -  Lee Rowing Club.

(59) Ross Cudmore  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (57) Noel Carey  -  Shandon Boat Club.

(88) Conor O’Callaghan  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (81) Jack Aherne  -  Cork Boat Club.

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

#Rowing: A number of races were held as part of the Cork Sculling Ladder at the Marina in Cork today. The conditions were rated as fair. Illness ruled out some of the proposed competitors and their challenges were postponed until the middle of this month.  

Results from the 2015 – 2016 Cork Sculling Ladder Challenges as on Sunday 31.01.2016 held at the Marina course, Cork.

1. (84) Luke Lee  -  Lee Rowing Club.  2. (89) Conor O’Callaghan  -  Cork Boat Club.   5 lenghts.

Umpire : Kieran Hughes.   Starter : Finbarr Desmond.

(13) Barry Connolly  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (11) Thomas Murphy  -  Lee Rowing Club. Postponed until mid-February. Connolly ill.

1.(22) Cormac Corkery  -  Cork Boat Club.  2. (21) Luke Guerin  -  Lee Rowing Club.  5 lengths.

Umpire : Kieran Hughes.  Starter : Finbarr Desmond.

1. (15) Feargal O’Sullivan  -  Cork Boat Club.  2. (14) David Breen  -  Lee Rowing Club.  5 lengths.

Umpire : Pat Hickey.  Starter : Finbarr Desmond.

(FC)(31) Liam O’Connell  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (12) Hugh Deasy  -  Lee Rowing Club. Postponed until mid-February.  O’Connell ill.

(FC)(30) Evan Curtin  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (23) Peter Jackson  -  Lee Rowing Club. Postponed until mid-February. Jackson ill.

1. (39) Ray Fitzgerald  -  Lee Rowing Club.  2. (FC)(52) Conor Twohig  -  Cork Boat Club.  5 lengths. 

Umpire : Pat Hickey.  Starter : Finbarr Desmond.

1.       (19) Conor Cudden  -  Shandon Boat Club.  2. (17) Hugh Sutton  -  Lee Rowing Club.  2 lengths.

 Umpire : Kieran Hughes.  Starter : Finbarr Desmond.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The Cork Sculling Ladder had a set of races on Sunday, December 20th at the Marina. In springlike conditions of showers and sunshine, water conditions were suprisingly good. Luke Guerin, who was late for his race with Conor Twohig, eventually came out on top. Twohig accepted a race, but suffered an injury.

Cork Sculling Ladder Results, December 20th

Race 1.   (FC)(55) Cormac Corkery  -  Cork Boat Club bt (22) Peter Jackson  -  Lee Rowing Club.   5 Lengths.

Race 2.  (14) Barry Connolly  -  Cork Boat Club bt (13) David Breen  Lee Rowing Club.   6 Lengths.

Race 3.  (7) Darragh Larkin  -  Lee Rowing Club bt (10) Barry O’Flynn  -  Cork Boat Club.   6 Lengths.

Race 4.  (52) Conor Twohig  -  Cork Boat Club  Row over (51) Luke Guerin  -  Presentation College Rowing Club, failed to turn up at start on time.

Race 5.  (52) Luke Guerin  -  Presentation College Rowing Club bt  (51) Conor Twohig  -  Cork Boat Club, DNF (Did not finish). Injured his back.

Race 6. (24) Eoin Larkin  -  Lee Rowing Club bt (27) Sam O’Neill  -  Shandon Boat Club, DNF, capsized at 900 metres.

Race 7.  (49) Alex Byrne  -  Shandon Boat Club bt (43) bt Morgan O’Hara  -  Lee Rowing Club.   5 Lengths.

Race 8. (32) Liam O’Connell  -  Cork Boat Club bt (31) Conor McCarthy  -  Cork Boat Club.   6 Lengths.

Race between (33) Eoin Gaffney  -  Shandon Boat Club and (29) Shane Crean  -  Lee Rowing Club.  Cancelled.

Starter : Finbarr Desmond.   Umpires : Kieran Hughes and Pat Hickey.

Rearranged challenges for Sunday 27.12.2015.

(84) Kieran White  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (78) Cormac O’Connell  -  Presentation College Rowing Club. Time TBC.

(FC)(124) Eoin Power  - Cork Boat Club  v  (80) Jack Aherne  -  Cork Boat Club. Time TBC.

Challenges. Dates and Times TBA.

(17) Feargal O’Sullivan  -  Cork Boat Club  v  (15) David Higgins  -  Presentation College Rowing Club.

(33) Eoin Gaffney  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (29) Shane Crean  -  Lee Rowing Club.

(45) Emmett Hickey  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (42) David Collins  -  Cork Boat Club.

(27) Sam O’Neill  -  Shandon Boat Club  v  (26) Neil McCarthy  -  Cork Boat Club

Note :  Racing depends on weather conditions.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ronan Byrne of Shandon Boat Club and Margaret Cremin of Lee Rowing Club lead the Cork Sculling Ladder. The two leaders both placed well in the single sculls tests at the Ireland trial at the National Rowing Centre on Sunday. Below is the ladder, with section leaders listed.

Leaders :
Men : (1) Ronan Byrne …… Shandon Boat Club. (Time Trial Winner).
Women : (47) Margaret Cremen ….. Lee Rowing Club. (Women’s Time Trial Winner).
 
Section Leaders.
 
Men.
 
Open : (1) Ronan Byrne ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Intermediate : (1) Ronan Byrne ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Club 1 : (3) Jack Casey ….. UCC Rowing Club.
Club 2 :(6) Darragh Larkin ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Novice : (16) Hugh Sutton ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Junior 18 : (1) Ronan Byrne ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Junior 16 : (10) Barry O’Flynn …. Cork Boat Club.
Junior 15 : (11) Thomas Murphy ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Junior 14 : (46) David Cosgrave ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Junior 13 : (118) Sean McCalgon ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Junior 12 : (156) Peter Leonard ….. Cork Boat Club.
Masters A : (18) Henrik Merz ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Masters B : (18) Henrik Merz ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Masters C : (18) Henrik Merz ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Masters D : (57) Pat Peilow ….. Cork Boat Club.
Masters E : (57) Pat Peilow ….. Cork Boat Club.
Masters F : (66) Tony Corcoran ….. Lee Valley Rowing Club.
Masters G : (66) Tony Corcoran ….. Lee Valley Rowing Club.
Masters H : (171) Seamus Quain ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Masters I : (171) Seamus Quain ….. Shandon Boat Club.
 
Women.
 
Open : (47) Margaret Cremen ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Intermediate : (47) Margaret Cremen ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Club 1 : (47) Margaret Cremen …… Lee Rowing Club.
Club 2 : (47) Margaret Cremen ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Novice : (71) Chelsey Minihane ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Junior 18 : (47) Margaret Cremen ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Junior 16 : (47) Margaret Cremen ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Junior 15 : (68) Jennifer Crowley …..Shandon Boat Club.
Junior 14 : (85) Sophie Gray ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Junior 13 : (133) Jennifer Forde ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Junior 12 : (133) Jennifer Forde ….. Shandon Boat Club.
Masters A : (137) Karen Corcoran-O’Hare ….. Lee Valley Rowing Club.
Masters B : (137) Karen Corcoran-O’Hare ….. Lee Valley Rowing Club.
Masters C : (160) Karen McCarthy-Dunne ….. Cork Boat Club.
Masters D : (162) Mary O’Callaghan …… Lee Rowing Club.
Masters E : (162) Mary O’Callaghan ….. Lee Rowing Club.
Published in Rowing

#Rowing: Ronan Byrne of Shandon Boat Club won the Cork Sculling Ladder time trial in an excellent time of six minutes 20.2 seconds today. Byrne had been the joint winner last year. Margaret Cremin of Lee Rowing Club was the fastest woman, in a time of 7:10.5.

One hundred and sixty six scullers competed in 44th time trial, sponsored by Hanley Calibration Ltd, over the 1800 metre course at the Marina. Some scullers competed twice: most sculled on the early incoming tide until nearly 11 am, helped by an easterly wind. Conditions early on were good, but once the tide changed they deteriorated and the ladder finished at 12 noon.

 Cremin, winner of the novice championship of Ireland this year, easily won from her clubmates, Willow Littlewood and Eimear Cummins.

 The 2015-2016 Cork Sculling Ladder continues with challenge races until the 28th March.  Scullers can join at any stage.

Cork Sculling Ladder, time trial (Selected Results) 

Men

1. Ronan Byrne (Shandon Boat Club) 6 mins 20.2 seconds,  2. Colm Hennessey (Shandon Boat Club) 6:23.1,  3. Jack Casey (UCC Rowing Club) 6:23.6, 4. Stephen O’Sullivan (Shandon Boat Club) 6:24.9,  5. Sean Lonergan (Shandon Boat Club) 2:27.5, 6. Darragh Larkin (Lee Rowing Club) 6:27.6.

Women

53. Margaret Cremin (Lee Rowing Club) 7:10.5,  67. Willow Littlewood (Lee Rowing Club) 7:26.5,  73. Eimear Cummins (Lee Rowing Club) 7:34.4,  74. Jennifer Crowley (Shandon Boat Club) 7:35.8.    

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The 2015-2016 Cork Sculling Ladder Time Trial, sponsored by Hanley Calibration Ltd., takes place on Sunday at the Marina course from 08.00am to 1.00pm. All the rowing clubs in Cork are due to participate in the 44th running of the event. Competitors are also due from Kerry and Tipperary. Last year, Shane O’Connell (Cork Boat Club) and Daniel O’Sullivan (Lee Rowing Club) were the joint winners. Claire Synnott (Lee Rowing Club) won the women’s event.  Ronan Byrne (Shandon Boat Club) won the Sculling Ladder outright six months later, as did Synnott. 

 About 200 single scullers are expected to take part. All races are run on an 1800 metre course at the Marina. After the Time Trial, competitors will race each other until the ladder concludes on March 28th.

Published in Rowing
Tagged under

#ROWING: The 2014-2015 Cork Sculling Ladder Time Trial, sponsored by Hanley Calibration Ltd., takes place at the Marina Course, Cork on this Sunday from 08.00am to 01.00pm. Last year from an entry of over 150 single scullers, John Mitchell (Lee Rowing Club) won the overall time trial and Marie O’Neill (Cork Boat Club) retained the women’s.
 A large entry is expected at the 43rd Sculling Ladder Time Trial especially with the sport in Cork on a high after major success at the Irish National Rowing Championships last July, with Cork Boat Club winning 7, Skibbereen Rowing Club 4, Lee Rowing Club, Presentation College Rowing Club, Shandon Boat Club and UCC Rowing Club, 1 apiece.  
 Competitors can launch only at Cork Boat Club and Shandon Boat Club as Lee Rowing Club do not have their new slip yet. Participants can also scull over the 1800 metre course as many times as they wish, but must have a different number each time if they are to have their time taken. The presentation to the two overall Time Trial winners (male and female) will take place at Cork Boat Club at 2.00pm.
 Once the Time Trial is over , the 2015-2015 Cork Sculling Ladder continues with two-boat racing until Sunday 29th March, 2015.

Published in Rowing

#ROWING: Colm Hennessy of Shandon Boat Club and Marie O’Neill of Cork Boat Club were the overall winners of the Cork Sculling Ladder for 2013-2014. O’Neill retained the title she had won in 2013. The presentation for all the winners of the Ladder will be made this evening by Judge Donagh McDonagh at Cork Constitution club at Temple Hill.

Published in Rowing
Page 1 of 2

Aquaculture Information

Aquaculture is the farming of animals in the water and has been practised for centuries, with the monks farming fish in the middle ages. More recently the technology has progressed and the aquaculture sector is now producing in the region of 50 thousand tonnes annually and provides a valuable food product as well as much needed employment in many rural areas of Ireland.

A typical fish farm involves keeping fish in pens in the water column, caring for them and supplying them with food so they grow to market size. Or for shellfish, containing them in a specialised unit and allowing them to feed on natural plants and materials in the water column until they reach harvestable size. While farming fish has a lower carbon and water footprint to those of land animals, and a very efficient food fed to weight gain ratio compared to beef, pork or chicken, farming does require protein food sources and produces organic waste which is released into the surrounding waters. Finding sustainable food sources, and reducing the environmental impacts are key challenges facing the sector as it continues to grow.

Salmon is the most popular fish bought by Irish families. In Ireland, most of our salmon is farmed, and along with mussels and oysters, are the main farmed species in the country.

Aquaculture in Ireland

  • Fish and shellfish are farmed in 14 Irish coastal counties.
  • Irish SMEs and families grow salmon, oysters, mussels and other seafood
  • The sector is worth €150m at the farm gate – 80% in export earnings.
  • The industry sustains 1,833 direct jobs in remote rural areas – 80% in the west of Ireland
  • Every full-time job in aquaculture creates 2.27 other jobs locally (Teagasc 2015)
  • Ireland’s marine farms occupy 0.0004% of Ireland’s 17,500Km2 inshore area.
  • 83% of people in coastal areas support the development of fish farming
  • Aquaculture is a strong, sustainable and popular strategic asset for development and job creation (Foodwise 2025, National Strategic Plan, Seafood
  • Operational Programme 2020, FAO, European Commission, European Investment Bank, Harvesting Our Ocean Wealth, Silicon Republic, CEDRA)
    Ireland has led the world in organically certified farmed fish for over 30 years
  • Fish farm workers include people who have spent over two decades in the business to school-leavers intent on becoming third-generation farmers on their family sites.

Irish Aquaculture FAQs

Aquaculture, also known as aquafarming, is the farming of aquatic organisms such as fish, crustaceans, molluscs and aquatic plants, and involves cultivating freshwater and saltwater populations under controlled conditions- in contrast to commercial fishing, which is the harvesting of wild fish. Mariculture refers to aquaculture practiced in marine environments and in underwater habitats. Particular kinds of aquaculture include fish farming, shrimp farming, oyster farming, mariculture, algaculture (such as seaweed farming), and the cultivation of ornamental fish. Particular methods include aquaponics and integrated multi-trophic aquaculture, both of which integrate fish farming and plant farming.

About 580 aquatic species are currently farmed all over the world, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), which says it is "practised by both some of the poorest farmers in developing countries and by multinational companies".

Increasing global demand for protein through seafood is driving increasing demand for aquaculture, particularly given the pressures on certain commercially caught wild stocks of fish. The FAO says that "eating fish is part of the cultural tradition of many people and in terms of health benefits, it has an excellent nutritional profile, and "is a good source of protein, fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and essential micronutrients".

Aquaculture now accounts for 50 per cent of the world's fish consumed for food, and is the fastest-growing good sector.

China provides over 60 per cent of the world's farmed fish. In Europe, Norway and Scotland are leading producers of finfish, principally farmed salmon.

For farmed salmon, the feed conversion ratio, which is the measurement of how much feed it takes to produce the protein, is 1.1, as in one pound of feed producing one pound of protein, compared to rates of between 2.2 and 10 for beef, pork and chicken. However, scientists have also pointed out that certain farmed fish and shrimp requiring higher levels of protein and calories in feed compared to chickens, pigs, and cattle.

Tilapia farming which originated in the Middle East and Africa has now become the most profitable business in most countries. Tilapia has become the second most popular seafood after crab, due to which its farming is flourishing. It has entered the list of best selling species like shrimp and salmon.

There are 278 aquaculture production units in Ireland, according to Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM) *, producing 38,000 tonnes of finfish and shellfish in 2019 and with a total value of €172 million

There are currently almost 2,000 people directly employed in Irish aquaculture in the Republic, according to BIM.

BIM figures for 2019 recorded farmed salmon at almost 12,000 tonnes, valued at €110 million; rock oysters reached 10,300 tonnes at a value of €44 million; rope mussels at 10,600 tonnes were valued at €7 million; seabed cultured mussels at 4,600 tonnes were valued at €7 million; "other" finfish reached 600 tonnes, valued at €2 million and "other" shellfish reached 300 tonnes, valued at €2 million

Irish aquaculture products are exported to Europe, US and Asia, with salmon exported to France, Germany, Belgium and the US. Oysters are exported to France, with developing sales to markets in Hong Kong and China. France is Ireland's largest export for mussels, while there have been increased sales in the domestic and British markets.

The value of the Irish farmed finfish sector fell by five per cent in volume and seven per cent in value in 2019, mainly due to a fall on salmon production, but this was partially offset by a seven per cent increased in farmed shellfish to a value of 60 million euro. Delays in issuing State licenses have hampered further growth of the sector, according to industry representatives.

Fish and shellfish farmers must be licensed, and must comply with regulations and inspections conducted by the Sea Fisheries Protection Authority and the Marine Institute. Food labelling is a function of the Food Safety Authority of Ireland. There is a long backlog of license approvals in the finfish sector, while the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine says it is working to reduce the backlog in the shellfish sector.

The department says it is working through the backlog, but notes that an application for a marine finfish aquaculture licence must be accompanied by either an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or an Environmental Impact Assessment Report (EIAR). As of October 2020, over two-thirds of applications on hand had an EIS outstanding, it said.

The EU requires member states to have marine spatial plans by 2021, and Ireland has assigned responsibility to the Department of Housing, Planning and Local Government for the National Marine Planning Framework (NMPF). Legislation has been drawn up to underpin this, and to provide a "one stop shop" for marine planning, ranging from fish farms to offshore energy – as in Marine Planning and Development Management Bill. However, the Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine confirmed last year that it intends to retain responsibility for aquaculture and sea-fisheries related development – meaning fish and shellfish farmers won't be able to avail of the "one stop shop" for marine planning.

Fish and shellfish health is a challenge, with naturally occurring blooms, jellyfish and the risk of disease. There are also issues with a perception that the sector causes environmental problems.

The industry has been on a steep learning curve, particularly in finfish farming, since it was hailed as a new future for Irish coastal communities from the 1970s – with the State's Electricity Supply Board being an early pioneer, and tobacco company Carrolls also becoming involved for a time. Nutrient build up, which occurs when there is a high density of fish in one area, waste production and its impact on depleting oxygen in water, creating algal blooms and "dead zones", and farmers' use of antibiotics to prevent disease have all been concerns, and anglers have also been worried about the impact of escaped farmed salmon on wild fish populations. Sea lice from salmon farmers were also blamed for declines in sea trout and wild salmon in Irish estuaries and rivers.

BIM says over 95% of all salmon farmed in Ireland are certified organic. Organically grown salmon are only fed a diet of sustainable organic feed. They are also raised in more spacious pens than traditional farmed salmon. The need to site locations for fish farms further out to sea, using more robust cages for weather, has been recognised by regulatory agencies. There is a move towards land-based aquaculture in Norway to reduce impact on local ecosystems. The industry says that antibiotic use is declining, and it says that "safe and effective vaccinations have since been developed for farmed fish and are now widely used". Many countries are now adopting a more sustainable approach to removing sea lice from salmon, using feeder fish such as wrasse and lumpsucker fish. Ireland's first lumpsucker hatchery was opened in 2015.

BIM says over 95% of all salmon farmed in Ireland are certified organic. Organically grown salmon are only fed a diet of sustainable organic feed. They are also raised in more spacious pens than traditional farmed salmon. The need to site locations for fish farms further out to sea, using more robust cages for weather, has been recognised by regulatory agencies. There is a move towards land-based aquaculture in Norway to reduce impact on local ecosystems. The industry says that antibiotic use is declining, and it says that "safe and effective vaccinations have since been developed for farmed fish and are now widely used". Many countries are now adopting a more sustainable approach to removing sea lice from salmon, using feeder fish such as wrasse and lumpsucker fish. Ireland's first lumpsucker hatchery was opened in 2015.

Yes, as it is considered to have better potential for controlling environmental impacts, but it is expensive. As of October 2020, the department was handling over 20 land-based aquaculture applications.

The Irish Farmers' Association has represented fish and shellfish farmers for many years, with its chief executive Richie Flynn, who died in 2018, tirelessly championing the sector. His successor, Teresa Morrissey, is an equally forceful advocate, having worked previously in the Marine Institute in providing regulatory advice on fish health matters, scientific research on emerging aquatic diseases and management of the National Reference Laboratory for crustacean diseases.

BIM provides training in the national vocational certificate in aquaculture at its National Fisheries College, Castletownbere, Co Cork. It also trains divers to work in the industry. The Institute of Technology Carlow has also developed a higher diploma in aqua business at its campus in Wexford, in collaboration with BIM and IFA Aquaculture, the representative association for fish and shellfish farming.

© Afloat 2020

At A Glance - Irish Aquaculture

  • Fish and shellfish are farmed in 14 Irish coastal counties
  • Salmon is the most popular fish bought by Irish families. 
  • In Ireland, most of our salmon is farmed, and along with mussels and oysters, are the main farmed species in the country.
  • The industry sustains 1,833 direct jobs in remote rural areas – 80% in the west of Ireland
  • Every full-time job in aquaculture creates 2.27 other jobs locally (Teagasc 2015)
  • Ireland’s marine farms occupy 0.0004% of Ireland’s 17,500Km2 inshore area.
  • 83% of people in coastal areas support the development of fish farming

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating