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Displaying items by tag: Arklow Shipping

#ports&shipping - The latest in a long line of newbuild cargsoship replacements for Arklow Shipping has been identified by Afloat and not surprisingly built in a Dutch shipyard, writes Jehan Ashmore.

A steady succession of new tonnage in recent years has been ordered by ASL from in fact two Dutch yards. On this occasion it is Royal Bodewes based in Hoogezand and where the newbuild has been given yard No. 728. So what is the name of this 8th of 10 newbuilds ordered?  The answer is Arklow Venus.

This 'Venus' revives that of a predecessor that belonged to an older generation. That been a trio of smaller cargoships all since been disposed but continue serving other owners. 

As for the new V class, they have a 87m long hull that features a straight-stem bow. This is to reduce wave resistance and save on fuel consumption adding to greater efficiencies.

The previous sister, Arklow Vanguard made her launch on 'Bloomsday' and has since entered service.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#50ships - The maiden delivery voyage of Arklow Vanguard is significant as Arklow Shipping now totals a record 50 cargoships and follows the company's 50th anniverary last year, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Arklow Vanguard made the delivery passage on Monday from Delfzijl to Rotterdam, where the 87m newbuild has as a port of registry. This is because the Dutch subsidiary, Arklow Shipping Nederland B.V. are located in the giant port. They are responsible in managing 19 cargoships. 

The balance of 31 cargoships are under the Irish flag and registered in the owner’s homeport of Arklow, Co. Wicklow. The headoffice of Arklow Shipping Ltd overlooks the River Avoca from where chartering teams are based and that of the Rotterdam office. To put into context they operate the mixed flagged fleet that range from the 4,900dwt ‘R’ class short-sea traders to a pair of 34,900dwt ‘S’ class sisters that trade worldwide. These cargoships are employed to carry project cargoes, grain, generals and bulk commodities including those classified under IMO regulations.

Arklow Vanguard has a 5,150dwt and is a Royal Bodewes Eco-Trader built to that yard’s own design that features a straight-stem bow design. This reduces wave resistance and so saves on fuel consumption. Also a stream-lined hull form adds to greater efficiencies.

As previously reported, launching of Arklow Vanguard took place in late March in Hoogezand near Groningen. The newbuild brings to five so far delivered out of a total of 10 Eco-Traders or ‘V’ class short-sea dry cargoships. Among, the typical cargoes to be transported will be grain, animal feed and steel rails. 

Published in Ports & Shipping

#NewBulkers- Shipbuilder Ferus Smit whose Dutch yard is according to Ships Monthly to continue constructing further newbuilds for Arklow Shipping.

The yard at Westerbroek has been given an order for a quartet of small handy-sized bulk-carriers of around 16,500dwt each. The first pair of vessels measuring 149.5m by 19.4m are to be delivered in 2018 and the second pair in 2019 respectively.

The order follows a series of ten 'C' class 5,200dwt general cargsoships in which Afloat has previously reported on those so far completed. The last launched been Arklow Castle.

Afloat also adds that the latest series are larger bulkers than the existing ‘W’ class of around 13,900dwt. At this stage though Arklow Wind only remains in service (see report) following sale of sisters to overseas owners.

The W class bulk-carriers dating to more than a decade ago totalled three. They were ASL’s first ships to be built at a yard outside in Europe. The order having gone to a Japanese shipyard.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#ShippingReview - Jehan Ashmore reviews the shipping scene from among the following stories of the past fortnight.

Scotline the short-sea timber products operator has taken a time-charter of Lady Ariane from a Dutch owner. The cargoship sailed from Varberg, Sweden to Wicklow Port.

A pair of 87m newbuild cargoships of the mixed flagged fleet of Arklow Shipping made calls to the Port of London. Irish flagged Arklow Cadet was joined on the Thames by the brand new Dutch flagged Arklow Valour having anchored off the Kent coast: see Port of Dover freight record.

Across the North Sea at Emshaven, the Netherlands is where newbuild Arklow Valour had undergone seatrials. More recently the bitumen tanker Iver Ability docked there and not Delfzijl as expected.

Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council executive will undertake a full risk assessment into transfer ownership of Dun Laoghaire Harbour to the local authority, it has emerged.

A first batch of tower sections for wind turbine projects arrived at Port of Waterford for GE Wind on board BBC Orion (2007/7,223grt). A further two projects cargoes are due to the port this year.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#FinalWbulker - Arklow Castle (5,054dwt) this month became the third ‘C’ class cargoship launched, the same number had been built for older ‘W’ class bulkers, in which only one remains in service, writes Jehan Ashmore.

This third and final sister is the Irish-flagged Arklow Wind which is currently berthed at Montoir-de-Bretagne on the Loire Estuary. The 13,988dwt bulker having made a passage to France across the Bay of Biscay from Gijon in northern Spain.  

A sister, Arklow Wave dating a year earlier to 2003 has been sold by Arklow Shipping Ltd to landlocked owners in Switzerland. According to Ships Monthly, the 13,977dwt Arklow Wave has been acquired by Nova Marine Carriers SA, of Switzerland. The 136m ship has been renamed NACC Toronto.

The final sister of the trio, Arklow Willow was sold last year to overseas owners not in Europe, but in fact to north America interests. Canadian company, McNeil Marine Ltd of Hamilton based in Ontario purchased the bulker. They renamed her Florence Spirit. She along with her sisters were built for ASL in Japan by the Kyokuyo Shipyard Corporation. 

There has been an impressive surge in newbuild orders, even by ASL standards. The shipping company which celebrated its 60th anniverasary last year, has in recent years placed orders for the ‘C’ class as referred above but also for ‘B’ as well as ‘V’ class cargoships. Of these newbuilds, only the C class fly the tricolour, the rest of these new ship series are Dutch flagged. 

The progressive fleet expansion and in replacing ageing tonnage no doubt suggests Arklow Wind’s days are increasingly numbered.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#CapeLaunch – A cargoship was launched today for Irish owners as the second of 10 in a new series from a shipyard in the Netherlands, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Ferus Smit’s Dutch yard in Westerbroek, is where the single hold 5,054dwt cargoship, Arklow Cape (yard No. 435) slid into the canal. The 'C' class newbuild of 2,999grt is to be delivered next month to Arklow Shipping Ltd. Leadship, Arklow Cadet made her entry onto the same waterway in June. 

It is pleasing to see that ASL have the newbuild with an Irish port of registry, that been her owners homeport in Co. Wicklow. This is not the case for their subsidiary, Arklow Shipping Nederland B.V. as their vessels are registered in Rotterdam.

More newbuilds will join this Dutch fleet as 10 ‘V’ class cargoships are on order also in this country. A fifth sister of 5,100dwt is under completion, in which Afloat can reveal is named Arklow Valour.

The newbuild programme has also seen ASL make disposals, most recently the 2002 built Arklow Rose. She was sold to UK owners, Charles M. Willie & Co. (Shipping) Ltd of Cardiff, Wales.

As for bulker, Arklow Willow (which almost a year ago dry-docked in Dublin) has according to the Maritime Insitute of Ireland been disposed in recent months to Canadian interests. 

The South Korean built 14,000dwt bulker dating to 2004 made her delivery voyage to Lake Ontario, having been sold to McKeil Marine, Hamilton. The family owned firm are traditionally tug operators on the Lawrence Seaway.

She was renamed Florence Spirit and is operating out of Toronto to Newfoundland.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#SeaTrials - As a new car ferry is to be launched in Co. Wicklow yard as previously reported, an Arklow Shipping Dutch flagged and built cargoship is making first sea trials today, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The Royal Bodewes newbuild no 724, Arklow Valley, a cargoship with a modified bow design compared to her more distinctive sisters to improve energy efficiency, had been transported yesterday under tow. This involved a pair of tugs to take the near 87m long newbuild from the inland shipyard near Groningen to Delfzijl.

Further along the coast at Eemshaven, is where Arklow Valley had sailed to and this afternoon the newbuild was in the open sea off the Western Frisian Islands in the North Sea.

She is the fourth so far completed from 10 in a series of 5,100dwat Bodewes Traders on order to ASL. They will be part of Arklow Shipping Nederlands B.V. with an office located in Rotterdam.

The new series or ‘V’ class are all Dutch flagged and began with leadship, Arklow Vale. The single hold vessel was launched and named just over a year ago, by ships godmother, Mrs Mari Louise de Jong.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#ShipSold - As Arklow Shipping continue a shipbuilding spree to replace ageing tonnage, one of their oldest ‘R’ class short-sea cargoships has been disposed, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Built in 2002 the Arklow Rose of 2,999 gross tonnage which as previously reported on Afloat.ie was at Cork Dockyard, Rushbrooke, part of the Doyle Shipping Group (DSG), has since been renamed Celtic Venture.

Of the near 50 strong joint Irish-Dutch flagged fleet (that includes deepsea bulkers), the 90m Arklow Rose was registered in Rotterdam where ASL’s division, Arklow Shipping Nederland B.V. is located.

The cargoship has transferred flag to the UK for owners, Charles M. Willie & Co. (Shipping) Ltd of Cardiff, Wales. The shipowner, managers and charterer company was established in 1912 with origins as coal exporters and timber (pit props) importers.

Having been alongside Cork Dockyard’s layby quay since 20 August, the vessel has re-entered the graving dock yesterday and where among the work been carried out is on the propeller blades.

Also confirmed with the new owners in that a former Celtic Venture in March was sold to Turkish owners. Afloat.ie has monitored the vessel this week in the Mediterranean which sails as Tahsin Imamoglu with a port of registry in Istanbul.

In between Arklow Rose drydocking and her return under a new name, was the Naval Service flagship HPV LE Eithne (P31) which vacated the facility also yesterday.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#NewCseries - The first in a new class of 10 cargoships for Arklow Shipping under construction near Groningen, Netherlands is to be launched next month and follows a series of a different design built by the same yard, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Launching of leadship newbuild no. 424 Arklow Cadet (also a new name for ASL), a ‘C’ class cargoship with a capacity of over 5,000dwt is to take place at Ferus Smit’s Dutch yard at Westerbroek.

The facility in north-east of the country is where newbuild no. 435 M.V. Ireland was christened (for non-Irish owners) in March as seen in footage previously featured on Afloat.ie. Note on the left of the screen is a green coloured hull mid-section of Arklow Cadet between the builder’s hall and that of M.V. Ireland before launching.

The newbuild represents the first under construction at the Dutch yard for ASL since Arklow Breeze became the final of six ‘B’ class 8,860dwt series. This newbuild no. 414 was launched in March 2015 and entered service the following month. Of the current fleet of 45 cargoships ranging from 4,200-35,000dwt, only 10 vessels date to 2004 or earlier.

Likewise of the Arklow Cadet the ‘B’ class have hulls form chosen to adapt the ‘bulbless’ principle thus creating a slender bow without bulb.

Arklow Cadet has one single hold volume of 220.000 cft. The C class have a 1A iceclass notation and they are propelled by a 1740 kW MaK engine with a single ducted propeller. Delivery of Arklow Cadet is scheduled for July of this year.

Another Dutch yard, Royal Bodewes in Hoogezand which is only several kms away from Ferus Smit continues to roll-out the ‘V’ class series of 10 Eco-Trader 5,100dwt newbuilds. The latest fourth newbuild's stern section was recently removed out of the builder's hall to the outfitting quay.

The V class are managed by Arklow Shipping Nederland B.V. based in Rotterdam and among the bulk dry cargoes they transport they include grain, animal feed and steel rails.

The last completed sister newbuild no. 723, Arklow Valiant launched at the end of March. This week the newbuild was towed down the canal to reach Delfzijl from where sisters have undergone sea-trails.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#TheTyrrells – Fifty years ago Arklow Shipping was formed, following the amalgamation in 1966 of three independent shipowning families from the east coast port in Co. Wicklow, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The families, Tyrrell, Kearon and the Hall’s all had origins directly in trading auxiliary sailing schooners from the banks of the River Avoca that flows through Arklow into the Irish Sea. The era of the days of sail trading were coming to a close during the 1950’s and ‘60’s as motorised coasters were increasingly taking over from the traditional schooners of the single-ship owners.

It was felt in certain quarters that such practises needed to be overhauled so to compete. This led to a co-operative which removed inefficiencies of the independent shipowners and instead by pooling resources to reduce costs.

The decline of the schooners by more efficient coasters led to the last Irish Sea schooner, De Wadden disposed. The vessel remains on display at the Merseyside Maritime Museum, Liverpool.

In the earliest formation to pool resources, the Arklow shipowners acquired a 12 year old German ship. The vessel had been taken as a war prize in 1945 by the British Admiralty and was sold in 1947 to trade with the Arklow families and renamed Tyrronall.

The coaster, Tyrronell derived its name from three letters chosen from the family surnames. The co-operative progressed when in 1966, Captains James Tyrrell, Michael Tyrrell and Victor Hall formed an umbrella company, Arklow Shipping under which together operated seven ships.

Under the following ship-owners: James Tyrrell Ltd contributed vessels (Darell, Valzell, Mariezell and Murell), Captain Michael Tyrrell (Avondale), Captain Richard Hall (River Avoca) and George Kearon Ltd (Reginald Kearon and Gloria). Of this initial fleet, all but two were managed by ASL.

It was not until 1970 that officially the company, Arklow Shipping Ltd was formed and over the next five decades, ASL have acquired numerous second-hand tonnage and ordered series of custom built vessels, notably from yards in the Netherlands, Spain and Korea.

The vessel naming nomenclature is now based on a nominated letter. i.e. the latest  is 'V' for the recent newbuild series, in which Arklow Valiant was launched last month. This vessel is the third of 10 newbuild 5,100dwat tonnes general cargsoships completed by Dutch yard, Royal Bodewes.

Asides the newbuild, the fleet total is 45-strong and ships are either general dry-cargo traders or bulk-carriers. The smallest series in the fleet are the 'R' class, for example, Arklow Rose of 4,933dwt to the largest 'S' class bulkers, the Arklow Spray of 34,905dwt. Both vessels are Irish flagged and unlike the newbuilds will be Dutch flagged under Arklow Shipping Nederland B.V. 

Across the ASL fleet, they transport a variety of cargoes among them in the bulk grain trades, steel rails, minerals, generals and containers.

The trading area is mostly north-western Europe though the bulk-carriers operate on international deep-sea trade routes.

Published in Ports & Shipping
Page 3 of 6

Ireland's Commercial Fishing 

The Irish Commercial Fishing Industry employs around 11,000 people in fishing, processing and ancillary services such as sales and marketing. The industry is worth about €1.22 billion annually to the Irish economy. Irish fisheries products are exported all over the world as far as Africa, Japan and China.

FAQs

Over 16,000 people are employed directly or indirectly around the coast, working on over 2,000 registered fishing vessels, in over 160 seafood processing businesses and in 278 aquaculture production units, according to the State's sea fisheries development body Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM).

All activities that are concerned with growing, catching, processing or transporting fish are part of the commercial fishing industry, the development of which is overseen by BIM. Recreational fishing, as in angling at sea or inland, is the responsibility of Inland Fisheries Ireland.

The Irish fishing industry is valued at 1.22 billion euro in gross domestic product (GDP), according to 2019 figures issued by BIM. Only 179 of Ireland's 2,000 vessels are over 18 metres in length. Where does Irish commercially caught fish come from? Irish fish and shellfish is caught or cultivated within the 200-mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ), but Irish fishing grounds are part of the common EU "blue" pond. Commercial fishing is regulated under the terms of the EU Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983 and with ten-yearly reviews.

The total value of seafood landed into Irish ports was 424 million euro in 2019, according to BIM. High value landings identified in 2019 were haddock, hake, monkfish and megrim. Irish vessels also land into foreign ports, while non-Irish vessels land into Irish ports, principally Castletownbere, Co Cork, and Killybegs, Co Donegal.

There are a number of different methods for catching fish, with technological advances meaning skippers have detailed real time information at their disposal. Fisheries are classified as inshore, midwater, pelagic or deep water. Inshore targets species close to shore and in depths of up to 200 metres, and may include trawling and gillnetting and long-lining. Trawling is regarded as "active", while "passive" or less environmentally harmful fishing methods include use of gill nets, long lines, traps and pots. Pelagic fisheries focus on species which swim close to the surface and up to depths of 200 metres, including migratory mackerel, and tuna, and methods for catching include pair trawling, purse seining, trolling and longlining. Midwater fisheries target species at depths of around 200 metres, using trawling, longlining and jigging. Deepwater fisheries mainly use trawling for species which are found at depths of over 600 metres.

There are several segments for different catching methods in the registered Irish fleet – the largest segment being polyvalent or multi-purpose vessels using several types of gear which may be active and passive. The polyvalent segment ranges from small inshore vessels engaged in netting and potting to medium and larger vessels targeting whitefish, pelagic (herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting) species and bivalve molluscs. The refrigerated seawater (RSW) pelagic segment is engaged mainly in fishing for herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting only. The beam trawling segment focuses on flatfish such as sole and plaice. The aquaculture segment is exclusively for managing, developing and servicing fish farming areas and can collect spat from wild mussel stocks.

The top 20 species landed by value in 2019 were mackerel (78 million euro); Dublin Bay prawn (59 million euro); horse mackerel (17 million euro); monkfish (17 million euro); brown crab (16 million euro); hake (11 million euro); blue whiting (10 million euro); megrim (10 million euro); haddock (9 million euro); tuna (7 million euro); scallop (6 million euro); whelk (5 million euro); whiting (4 million euro); sprat (3 million euro); herring (3 million euro); lobster (2 million euro); turbot (2 million euro); cod (2 million euro); boarfish (2 million euro).

Ireland has approximately 220 million acres of marine territory, rich in marine biodiversity. A marine biodiversity scheme under Ireland's operational programme, which is co-funded by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and the Government, aims to reduce the impact of fisheries and aquaculture on the marine environment, including avoidance and reduction of unwanted catch.

EU fisheries ministers hold an annual pre-Christmas council in Brussels to decide on total allowable catches and quotas for the following year. This is based on advice from scientific bodies such as the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. In Ireland's case, the State's Marine Institute publishes an annual "stock book" which provides the most up to date stock status and scientific advice on over 60 fish stocks exploited by the Irish fleet. Total allowable catches are supplemented by various technical measures to control effort, such as the size of net mesh for various species.

The west Cork harbour of Castletownbere is Ireland's biggest whitefish port. Killybegs, Co Donegal is the most important port for pelagic (herring, mackerel, blue whiting) landings. Fish are also landed into Dingle, Co Kerry, Rossaveal, Co Galway, Howth, Co Dublin and Dunmore East, Co Waterford, Union Hall, Co Cork, Greencastle, Co Donegal, and Clogherhead, Co Louth. The busiest Northern Irish ports are Portavogie, Ardglass and Kilkeel, Co Down.

Yes, EU quotas are allocated to other fleets within the Irish EEZ, and Ireland has long been a transhipment point for fish caught by the Spanish whitefish fleet in particular. Dingle, Co Kerry has seen an increase in foreign landings, as has Castletownbere. The west Cork port recorded foreign landings of 36 million euro or 48 per cent in 2019, and has long been nicknamed the "peseta" port, due to the presence of Spanish-owned transhipment plant, Eiranova, on Dinish island.

Most fish and shellfish caught or cultivated in Irish waters is for the export market, and this was hit hard from the early stages of this year's Covid-19 pandemic. The EU, Asia and Britain are the main export markets, while the middle Eastern market is also developing and the African market has seen a fall in value and volume, according to figures for 2019 issued by BIM.

Fish was once a penitential food, eaten for religious reasons every Friday. BIM has worked hard over several decades to develop its appeal. Ireland is not like Spain – our land is too good to transform us into a nation of fish eaters, but the obvious health benefits are seeing a growth in demand. Seafood retail sales rose by one per cent in 2019 to 300 million euro. Salmon and cod remain the most popular species, while BIM reports an increase in sales of haddock, trout and the pangasius or freshwater catfish which is cultivated primarily in Vietnam and Cambodia and imported by supermarkets here.

The EU's Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983, pooled marine resources – with Ireland having some of the richest grounds and one of the largest sea areas at the time, but only receiving four per cent of allocated catch by a quota system. A system known as the "Hague Preferences" did recognise the need to safeguard the particular needs of regions where local populations are especially dependent on fisheries and related activities. The State's Sea Fisheries Protection Authority, based in Clonakilty, Co Cork, works with the Naval Service on administering the EU CFP. The Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine and Department of Transport regulate licensing and training requirements, while the Marine Survey Office is responsible for the implementation of all national and international legislation in relation to safety of shipping and the prevention of pollution.

Yes, a range of certificates of competency are required for skippers and crew. Training is the remit of BIM, which runs two national fisheries colleges at Greencastle, Co Donegal and Castletownbere, Co Cork. There have been calls for the colleges to be incorporated into the third-level structure of education, with qualifications recognised as such.

Safety is always an issue, in spite of technological improvements, as fishing is a hazardous occupation and climate change is having its impact on the severity of storms at sea. Fishing skippers and crews are required to hold a number of certificates of competency, including safety and navigation, and wearing of personal flotation devices is a legal requirement. Accidents come under the remit of the Marine Casualty Investigation Board, and the Health and Safety Authority. The MCIB does not find fault or blame, but will make recommendations to the Minister for Transport to avoid a recurrence of incidents.

Fish are part of a marine ecosystem and an integral part of the marine food web. Changing climate is having a negative impact on the health of the oceans, and there have been more frequent reports of warmer water species being caught further and further north in Irish waters.

Brexit, Covid 19, EU policies and safety – Britain is a key market for Irish seafood, and 38 per cent of the Irish catch is taken from the waters around its coast. Ireland's top two species – mackerel and prawns - are 60 per cent and 40 per cent, respectively, dependent on British waters. Also, there are serious fears within the Irish industry about the impact of EU vessels, should they be expelled from British waters, opting to focus even more efforts on Ireland's rich marine resource. Covid-19 has forced closure of international seafood markets, with high value fish sold to restaurants taking a large hit. A temporary tie-up support scheme for whitefish vessels introduced for the summer of 2020 was condemned by industry organisations as "designed to fail".

Sources: Bord Iascaigh Mhara, Marine Institute, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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