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#Angling - Inland Fisheries Ireland has launched its Sponsorship Fund for 2018 which will support angling events and initiatives across the country.

The fund supported 79 events and initiatives across 19 counties to the tune of €30,000 in 2017, with a particular focus on those which help grow Ireland’s angling tourism product and support novice anglers.

Recreational angling is estimated to have contributed over €800 million to Ireland’s economy in 2017, supporting upwards of 11,000 jobs.

Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Sponsorship Fund aims to support large international competitions held in Ireland which showcase Ireland’s angling offering and contribute to local economies.

The fund also contributes to novice angler events which increase participation in angling among those who want to begin, or who have recently taken up, fishing as a hobby.

Finally, it also helps initiatives which disseminate information that promote conservation and protection of the inland fisheries and sea angling resource and can include seminars, workshops and training.

Support from the Sponsorship Fund can be either financial or resource support from IFI staff members.

According to IFI, angling offers rural communities the opportunity to increase the number of visitors to the area and in turn, support local business and create jobs by providing a sustainable source of income for both catering and accommodation services.

Suzanne Campion, IFI head of business development, said last year’s Sponsorship Fund “supported 79 initiatives all over the country which had a focus on helping grow Ireland’s angling tourism product and supporting novice anglers.

“Tourism initiatives like the Wild Atlantic Way and Ireland’s Ancient East are further boosting visitor numbers and our Sponsorship Fund for 2018 will support angling clubs and groups nationwide to offer local events which engage domestic anglers, overseas anglers and those who are about to cast for the first time.

“With Ireland having some of the best wild fisheries in Europe, this Sponsorship Fund forms part of our National Strategy for Angling Development which aims to develop our angling tourism potential while also managing and conserving our fisheries resource.”

IFI’s National Strategy for Angling Development is the first comprehensive national framework which will deliver a wide-ranging set of investments, innovations and promotions over the coming five years.

It aims to make angling accessible and attractive through information, infrastructure and support, to develop tourism through the promotion of the angling resource and to position angling as a key leisure and recreation pursuit.

The strategy is intended to deliver significant economic benefits in rural communities where much of angling takes place, while also ensuring that fish populations and habitats are protected and conserved.

Applications for funding from the 2018 Sponsorship Fund are now invited from angling clubs, associations or any local group organising an angling initiative.

The scheme will remain open for applications until Monday 22 January and all applications can be made online. Awards will be subject to budget availability and adherence to the scheme requirements.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Angling clubs have until this Friday 22 December to submit their tender for rivers opening in the New Year in the State Fisheries Tender Process for 2018.

Tenders will be accepted up until Friday for rivers opening in January 2018, and until 12 January or the remainder. Proof of postage on or before these date will be accepted.

The list of available fisheries can be found on the Inland Fisheries Ireland website. To tender for one or more fisheries, fill out the Condition of Tender and Application Form.

Mark your envelope TENDER APPLICATION and send it to Paul O’Reilly, Business Development, Inland Fisheries Ireland, 3044 Lake Drive, Citywest, Dublin 24.

If your angling club is interested in a longer term licence, fill out the relevant section on your form and IFI will get in touch. In the meantime, the ‘per year’ licence fee should be tendered.

For any queries relating to State Fisheries or the 2017 tender process, contact Paul O’Reilly at [email protected] or at 01 884 2600.

In addition, all clubs who held a licence on a State fishery during the 2016 season will need to fill out an End of Year Report Form and return it to IFI at the above address by 30 December.

End of Year reports may of course be posted together with tender applications, though no envelopes marked ‘TENDER APPLICATION’ will be opened until after the closing date for applications. Any tender cheques enclosed will also not be acknowledged until after 12 January.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Sean Kyne, Minister with responsibility for the inland fisheries sector, has welcomed the award of funding to the value of €2.2m by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) to 115 angling development and conservation initiatives as part of its National Strategy for Angling Development, Salmon Conservation Fund and Midlands Fisheries Fund.

The projects, which focus on improving Ireland’s inland fisheries and sea angling resource, will begin delivery in 2018.

In total, applications for over 140 projects were received bringing the overall value of projects applying for funding to above €2.9 million.

Minister Kyne said: “I would like to congratulate the applicants who have been awarded this funding. The projects receiving funding are located in 24 counties across the country.

“They include fisheries habitat conservation projects as well as the provision of infrastructure and equipment to allow for improved access to angling. Education/youth initiatives and projects aimed at attracting increased numbers of tourist anglers also attracted funding.”

Minister Kyne also noted the recently announced new ‘Fisheries Projects Animators’ scheme, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

“That initiative will support the implementation of these projects in assisting community organisations nationwide in realising these ambitious angling projects and conservation initiatives over the coming year,” he added.

The 2017 funding call was first announced in August, with local groups and individuals including local development associations, tidy towns, angling clubs, local authorities and others invited to apply for funding.

The IFI website has more information on the funding process and recipient projects, which are listed below.

Carlow

  • River Barrow, shore side, Woodford Dolmen Hotel Grounds, Killkenny Road, Carlow - Jetty situated on the bank of the River Barrow - Woodford Dolmen Hotel (€5,802)

Cavan

  • Brackley Lake - Footway to improve access to angling along Prospect Shore at Brackley Lake - Cavan County Council (€31,444)
  • Killnahard, Ballyheelan, Killnaleck - Improve boat slip and car park for angling access at Killnahard Bay - Lough Sheelin Trout Protection Association (€24,850)
  • Templeport Lake, Kildoagh, Templeport, Bawnboy - Templeport Lake Fishing Stand - Templeport Development Association (€2,000)

Clare

  • Fanore, North Clare - Angling equipment for Juvenile Training and Coaching Programme - Lisdoonvarna Fanore Sea Angling Club (€6,875)
  • Derg Isle Adventure Centre, Carrowmore - Angling equipment to develop youth angling – Ducey’s Personal Development Academy (€2,000)

Cork

  • River Blackwater (Munster), Mallow - Restoration and Enhancement of Angling Facilities catering for Game & Coarse Anglers in Mallow Town on River Blackwater (Munster) - Mallow Development Partnership (€89,157)
  • Deasy’s Stream, River Bandon, Bandon - Deasy's Stream Rehabilitation Project - Bandon Angling Association (€8,399)

Donegal

  • Buncrana - Feasibility study for habitat enhancement and angling access on the Crana River - Buncrana Anglers Association (€2,000)
  • Tully, Dungloe - Tully Boatshed, for angling boat repair and storage - Rosses Anglers Association (€21,492)
  • Gweebarra, Coolvoy, Doochary - Salmon fishing enhancement project - Gweebarra Fishing Club (€4,000)
  • Dunfanaghy, Sessiagh and Purt Lakes - Replacement lake boats to improve angling access - Dunfanaghy Angling Association (€6,575)
  • Lough Keel, Skerry, Kilmacrennan - Angling boats to improve access to angling - The Letterkenny & District Anglers Association (€5,684)
  • Loughanure, Anangry - Wheelchair/Less-Abled lake access - Loughanure Anglers (€11,269)
  • Bunagee Pier, Culdaff - Junior Sea Angling Taster Sessions - Culdaff Sea Angling Club (€4,275)
  • Owencarrow River, Glen Lough and Lough Natooey, Creeslough - Development Plan 2014-18 for Angling, Tourism and Conservation on the Creeslough Fisheries - Creeslough & District Angling Association (€223,750)
  • Ray River, Carrowcanon, Falcaragh - Ray River habitat rehabilitation project - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€27,000)
  • Marketing & Promotion of Game & Sea Angling in Donegal by the Donegal Angling Tourism Alliance (DATA) - Creeslough & District Angling Association (€24,638)
  • Crolly River, Gweedore - Crolly River Habitat Restoration and Improvement - Crolly Angling Association (€5,760)

Dublin

  • Royal Canal & Grand Canal - Expansion of summer youth angling programme - Finglas Youth Resource Centre (€5,988)
  • Straffan to Celbridge Fishery, Co Kildare - Feasibility report on the Straffan to Celbridge Fishery - Dublin Trout Anglers’ Association (€2,000)
  • Marketing and promotional events to grow angling club membership - Dublin Trout Anglers Association (€1,300)

Galway

  • Calla, Kilconnell, Ballinasloe - Disabillity carpark and access point and new permanent fishing stand - Kilconnell Community Development Association Ltd (€6,810)
  • Owenglin River, Couravoughill, Clifden - Improvement of Owenglin river access walkway - Clifden Trout Anglers Association (€19,530)
  • Tuam - Angling equipment to develop youth angling - Outdoor Ranger Ltd (€2,000)
  • Leenane public carpark - Fisheries species, habitat and angling information signage - Leenane Development Association (€122)
  • Bundorragha River, Bundorragha, Whin Pool, Leenane; Finlough Weed Control, Delphi, Leenane - Angling Access Delphi Fishery - Delphi Fishery Ltd (€1,614)
  • Clare River south bank from Claregalway village in the townland of Lakeview to the most easterly point of the townland of Lydacan - Clare River angler access from Claregalway to Gortatleva (Phase 1) - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€7,888)
  • Dawros River, Kylemore, Letterfrack, Connemara - Kylemore Abbey Angling Access Programme - Kylemore Abbey & Gardens Ltd (€19,881)
  • Annaghdown; Ballindiff; Commercial boat club, Galway City; Collinamuuck; Cornamona; Cong, Co Mayo; Oughterard; Moycullen; Headford; Kilbeg; Cross, Co Mayo - Fisheries enhancement and angling access project - Lough Corrib Angling Trout Federation (€3,517)
  • Abbert River, Monivea - Tiquin Area - Abbert River Spawning & Habitat Regeneration - Cairde Na Chlair (€56,685)
  • Baurisheen, Oughterard - Purchase of boats to improve angler access - Kevin Molloy Boat Hire (€4,375)
  • Kilroe (Cahermorris) River, Kilroe, Annaghdown - Fencing & in-stream development - Annaghdown Angling Club (€3,026)
  • Bunownen River, Glencroff area and Leenane - West of Leenane Invasive Species Survey and Management Plan - Forum Connemara CLG (€1,837)
  • Carrick Shore, Clonbur - Angling boats to improve angler access - Hugh O'Donnell (€4,000)
  • River Bunowen - Rock ramp on River Bunowen, Ahascragh - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€120,000)
  • Lough Corrib, Glann, Oughterard - Angling boats to improve angler access - Lough Corrib Boats (€7,500)
  • Glencorbet, Kylemore - Kylemore Riverbank and spawning bed restoration project - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€10,238)
  • Bealanabrack River, Kilmilken, Maam - Riparian management, Bealanabrack - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€4,400)

Kerry

  • Big River, Tralee - Big River Habitat Improvement Scheme - Kerry County Council (€12,335)
  • River Feale, Triereragh, Duagh, Listowel - Access road, car park and disabled angling stands and box type bridge and guard rails - Daniel O Donoghue (€22,000)
  • River Feale, Triereragh, Duagh - Feasibility study, environmental impact study and document preparation into the improving access to angling for disabled persons - Daniel O Donoghue (€4,373)
  • Dungeel, Gortnascarry, Ballymalis and Beaufort - Walkways Stiles and Bridges Roadways and Carpark Improvements - Laune Salmon and Trout Anglers' Association (€2,033)
  • Various beaches and public bridges and piers - Youth angling development project - Kerry Diocesan Youth Service (€7,470)
  • River Laune, Killorglin - Angling equipment for pilot youth angling development programme - Caragh Bridge Angling Club (€1,012)

Kildare

  • Kellyville Lake, Ballintubbert, Co Laois - Feasibility Study on water levels in Kellyville Lake in Laois by Kildare-based club - Athy & District Anglers Club (€6,300)

Leitrim

  • Angling Marketing Guide: Discover Angling in Leitrim - Leitrim Integrated Development Company CLG (€1,197)

Limerick

  • River Loobagh, Kilmallick - Invasive species identification and Management Program in the Ballyhoura Catchment area - Ballyhoura Development CLG (€667)

Longford

  • Lough Leebeen, Rathmore, Aughnacliffe - Provision of a public toilet for the use of anglers in Leebeen Park, Aughnacliffe - Leebeen Park Development Ltd (€9,072)
  • Lanesborough - Equipment for youth angling initiative - St. Mel's College Angling Club (€800)
  • Lakes in and surrounding areas of Longford - Small easy to manage boat for less able persons to access angling - Melview Lodge (€3,143)

Louth

River Dee, Cappogue, on Drumcar Weir - Dee Fish Counter Project 2017 - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€31,467)

River Boyne, Boyne Valley - Boyne Valley Fishing Guides website enhancement - Boyne Valley Fishing Guides (€1,950)

Mayo

  • Altnabrocky River, Bellacorrick - Protection of further spawning areas & bank reinforcement - R Hewat (GlenAlt Syndicate) (€15,000)
  • River Erriff, townland of Glennacally - Erriff bank protection/ Western Way walk 2017 - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€23,383)
  • River Moy at Tawnaghbeg, Straide, Foxford and four other locations - Tourist and Angler Information Maps - East Mayo Anglers Association (€5,763)
  • Lough Corrib, Cong - Replacement of timber walkway and redevelopment of The Roach Pond, Cong - Cong and District Anglers Association (€7,380)
  • River Moy, Laghtmacdurkan & Ardhoom Tds, Meelick, Swinford - Erecting/Replacement of stiles and footbridges along club waters of the River Moy - East Mayo Anglers Association (€4,059.08)
  • Erriff River, Letterass, Kilbride - Development of angling access and walk way facilities at Aasleigh Falls - Mayo County Council (€12,500)
  • Cuilbaun, Tawnaghbeg, Straide, Foxford - Disabled Anglers Facility - East Mayo Anglers Association (€154,087)
  • Newport Quay and Clew Bay - Equipment for training novice sea anglers - Newport Sea Angling Club (€1,103)
  • Cushlough, Ballinrobe - Car park resurfacing and parking alignment & security fencing - Ballinrobe and District Anglers Association (€21,263)
  • Carrowniskey River, Carrowniskey, Louisburgh - Riverbank regeneration, Carrowniskey - Anthony Jordan (€529)
  • Louisburgh - Carrownisky River Rehabilitation Project - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€9,080)
  • Owenmore River, Drummin East - Owenmore (Drummin East) Bank Rehabilitation Project - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€6,150)
  • Fish Counter replacement - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€31,467)
  • Glenummera, Teevnabinnia - Bank reinstatement and rehabilitation of the Glenummera River, which is one of the main spawning tributaries of Delphi Fishery for wild salmon and sea trout - Delphi Fishery Ltd (€15,000)

Meath

  • Kells Blackwater, from Lough Ramor, Co Cavan to Headford Bridge, Kells - Tourist/Visitor mapping and pamphlet design and production - Kells Anglers Association (€1,580)
  • River Boyne, Ballybatter, Balreask New and Balreask Old, Navan - Fisheries enhancement project - Navan Anglers (€7,740)
  • Trimblestown and Boycestown - Installation of fencing, drinkers, deflectors, top up gravel shoals, bank protection works etc - Trim Athboy Angling Association (€15,000)
  • River Deel, Grange Beg, Killucan, Westmeath - Deel habitat enhancement - Boyne Catchment Angling Association (€15,000)
  • Kells Blackwater, Carnaros - Hartion's Bridge - Instream habitat enhancement works - Kells Anglers Association (€15,000)
  • River Boyne, Athlumney, Navan - Spawning gravel - Navan Anglers (€4,920)

Monaghan

  • Lough Muckno (Fane Catchment) Concra, Castleblayney - Develop Angling Access at South Lodge, Lough Muckno - Monaghan Co Council (€111,369)
  • Anny Shore, Lough White, Anny - Resurfacing of existing access road and carpark - Monaghan Co Council (€20,549)
  • Lisgillan, White Lake, Cremorne, Co Monaghan - Improvement of access road and carpark - Monaghan Co Council (€29,206)
  • South Shore, Lough Major, Ballybay - Improve access to the fishing stands - Monaghan Co Council (€1,706)
  • Knappagh Water, Lacken, Cortubber - Upgrading and providing new fishing infrastructure - Bawn Area Community Group Limited (€15,270)

Offaly

  • Tullamore River, Tullamore - Feasibility study of the Tullamore River - Offaly County Council (€2,000)

Roscommon

  • Grange Lake, Strokestown - Angling equipment to develop tourism & access to Strokestown lakes - Grange Lodge (€4,467)
  • Shannon River, Lackan Td, Kilteevan - Portrunny Slipway, Lough Ree - Roscommon County Council (€50,000)
  • Frances River (Suck catchment), Castlerea - Fisheries enhancement on the Frances River, Castlrea - Castlerea Town Trust (€24,601)
  • Bealnamullia, Cuilleen & Ardgawna townlands, Monksland, Athlone - Cross River Walkway - Roscommon County Council (€50,000)
  • River Shannon - Quayside wall, Ballyleague & various locations at Lough Ree - Feasibility study for a new angling centre, boat and tourism facility - Lough Ree Angling Hub (€935)
  • Cavetown Croghan, Boyle - Cavetown Angling Renewal/Development: Reinstate fishing stands, erection of foot stileriparian zone improvement, fish passage improvement, spawning enhancement and provision of in stream structures - Cavetown Residents Developments Company (€98,144)
  • Portrunny, Fearragh, Ballymurray - Portrunny Aquatic Biodiversity Sign - Portrun Development Association CLG (€1,728)

Sligo

  • Bellanascarrow Lake, Lavally, Ballymote - Upgrade of access for mobility impaired anglers and enhancement to existing angling facilities - Ballymote & District Angling Club (€17,374)
  • Western end Lough Gill at Aughamore Far - Replacement jetty structure Aghamore Far, Lough Gill - Sligo Anglers Association (€15,456)
  • The falls and ladders Ballisodare fishery, Ballisodare - Part funding of fisheries angling access development project - ballisodare fishing club ltd (€20,000)
  • River Easkey, Dromore West - Habitat enhancement and angler access improvement - River Easkey Angling Club (€13,500)
  • Duff River, Bunduff - Duff River Angling Access Path - Sligo County Council (€40,312)
  • Lough Gill, Hazelwood Demesne Td, Calry - Restoration of breakwater, silt removal of semi enclosed area and boat slip clearance. - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€6,089)
  • Garavogue River, Cleveragh Demesne - Assessment of the potential environmental impact for the installation of four accessible angling stands on Garavogue River - Sligo County Council (€2,000)

Tipperary

  • River Anner - River enhancement and restoration programme on River Anner - Clonmel Tourism CE (€32,000)
  • Glengoole, Thurles - Lough Doire Bhile, Tree planting to improve shelter for anglers in open area - Sliabh Ardagh Rural Development CLG (€6,797)

Tyrone

  • Blackwater (main channel) from Ballagh Bridge to Favour Royal - Feasibility study to develop access to southern bank of Northern Blackwater - River Blackwater Catchment Trust (€5,000)

Waterford

  • Knockaderry Reservoir, Kilmeaden - Replacement of angling boats - Waterford City and County Trout Anglers Association (€9,850)
  • River Blackwater, Salterbridge, Cappoquin - Repair and improve access to stream deflector - Cappoquin Salmon and Trout Anglers Association (€27,236)

Westmeath

  • Tudenham Stream, Rochfort Demense, Mullingar - Tudenham Stream enhancement - Lough Ennell Trout Preservation Association (€10,509)
  • Kilpatrick, Hopestown, Mullingar - Kilpatrick Stream enhancement - Lough Ennell Trout Preservation Association (€13,939)
  • Mid Shannon and nearby lakes and waterways - Angling marketing material for Athlone.ie - Westmeath County Council (€2,000)
  • Tullaghan, Lough Owel, Mullingar - Jeep & trailer parking to increase angling access at Tullaghan, Lough Owel, Mullingar - Westmeath County Council (€24,372)
  • Lough Derravagh, Dunore Shore, Multyfarnham - Boat slip improvement and jetty - Lough Derravargh Angling Club (€39,800)

Wicklow

  • River Vartry, Ashford - River Vartry rehabilitation: Tree pruning and invasive species removal - River Vartry Protection Society (€13,025)
  • Arklow Harbour - Sea angling access ladders upgrade in Arklow Harbour - Wicklow County Council (€10,267)
  • Angling equipment to assist local community groups in providing their students and clients with access to supervised angling activities - Fishing Futures c/o Wicklow Travellers Group (€1,630)
  • Wicklow Harbour - Sea angling access ladders upgrade in Wicklow Harbour - Wicklow County Council (€10,267)
  • Bray Harbour - Sea angling access ladders upgrade in Bray Harbour - Wicklow County Council (€10,267)

Nationwide

  • Possible filming locations are as follows: Spring time roach fishing - River Shannon, Portumna; Bream fishing in Ireland - Timplehouse lake, Ballymote, Co Sligo; Hybrids fishing on the feeder - Garadice lake, Co. Leitrim; Pole fishing in Ireland - River Inny or River Shannon; Canal Fishing in Ireland, Grand Canal - Promotional Angling Videos - Cathal Hughes Angling (€1,875)
  • Dublin Angling Initiative (covering Louth, Dublin, Wicklow, Meath, Kildare) - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€70,062)
  • Dublin Angling Initiative angling equipment - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€8,057)
  • Atlas of Big Fish in Ireland - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€35,603)
  • Youth Angling Development - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€80,259)
  • Pop up pond - bring angling to the people - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€1,100)
  • Angling simulator for introduction to youth angling - Inland Fisheries Ireland (€2,000)
Published in Angling

#Angling - Sean Kyne, Minister with Responsibility for the inland fisheries sector, has welcomed Inland Fisheries Ireland’s intention to take on five new ‘Fisheries Projects Animators’.

These new recruits will assist community organisations nationwide in realising ambitious angling projects and conservation initiatives for the coming year.

“I have secured the additional funding for IFI to enable this recruitment which will build IFI’s capacity to support the many excellent community-based organisations engaged with our inland fisheries and sea angling resource who are delivering projects under the National Strategy for Angling Development,” said Minister Kyne.

“This is a key deliverable under the development strategy to supplement the excellent work IFI are doing in administering the investment scheme by offering assistance to community project promoters. These new temporary posts will harness the potential already in the sector to deliver on development projects.”

The inland fisheries resource is worth €836 million to the Irish economy annually and supports upwards of 11,000 jobs, often in rural and peripheral communities.

Inland Fisheries Ireland says it wants to grow the angling sector’s socio-economic contribution by an additional €60 million annually, by ensuring that Ireland’s fish stocks and angling infrastructure are protected and enhanced into the future.

Last year, 50 angling development projects around Ireland were awarded with funding to the value of €500,000 in total under Inland Fisheries Ireland’s 2016 Capital Works Fund. The successful applicants for 2018’s funding will be announced next week.

Suzanne Campion, head of business development with Inland Fisheries Ireland, said of the project animators plan: “We are delighted the minister has approved the funding for these roles. They will be exciting but challenging positions, requiring experience and expertise across a range of criteria, and will be geographically located based on the demands of the numerous projects seeking assistance and input.

“We will be looking for enthusiastic and driven candidates for this dynamic team that will enable stakeholders to deliver on projects and build capacity across the recreational fisheries sector.”

Published in Angling

#Angling - Denis Naughten, Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment, has officially launched two new angling developments by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) at Emlaghroyan in Roscommon and ‘The Mudflats’ at Carrick-on-Shannon in Co Leitrim.

A new match angling stretch has been provided at Emlaghroyan, on the River Suck in Roscommon, with upgraded car parking and drive-to-peg facilities.

This development involved upgrading existing roadways and the construction of new access roadway.

Ten new match angling pegs have been provided, with a capacity for further extension.

The Suck Valley Angling Hub were recently granted additional funds through the National Strategy for Angling Development (NSAD) to extend the match venue to further promote tourism angling and facilitate match competitions in the Roscommon/East Galway area.

Together with recently unveiled developments on the River Suck at Lough Acalla, the total investment in the River Suck project was €87,000.

In Leitrim, another major 2017 development project has been completed with an investment of €103,000, providing new facilities at ‘The Mudflats’ on the main River Shannon at Carrick-on-Shannon.

The new floating angling stand is accompanied by improved roadways and parking, upgraded toilet facilities and a new slipway.

This is another important match angling venue, used widely for international match angling events such as the World Pairs and the Carrick Angling Festival.

Speaking in Carrick-On-Shannon after the ribbon-cutting ceremony yesterday (Friday 1 December), Minister Naughten said: “I am delighted to mark the official opening of these developments today. Both were completed under the National Strategy for Angling Development (NSAD) and greatly enhance the angling infrastructure in both counties. They will provide a boost to angling tourism potential in the region, which in turn should increase visitor numbers.

“Furthermore, these projects would not be possible without the cooperation, agreement and vision of the respective landowners and I would like to thank all those involved for their contribution to these developments.”

More applications from the region are currently going through the NSAD assessment process, and aim to enhance the angling infrastructure in the upper Shannon areas as well as promote participation in angling.

Two weeks ago Minister Naughten unveiled new angling infrastructure in Galway and Athlone, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Sean Kyne, Minister with responsibility for Inland Fisheries, has welcomed the development by Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) of a specific stock management plan for Galway’s Owenriff system aimed at removing pike from the system as a significant step forward.

Stock management operations are normally commenced in February each year and the Owenriff plan will be implemented for 2018.

Minister Kyne said: “I met recently with the board and senior management of Inland Fisheries Ireland to discuss this, and other issues, and it has now been agreed that, in line with current policy, a stock management plan explicitly for the Owenriff will be implemented in a more intensive focus on the system to facilitate the recovery of the salmonid populations.

“It has also been agreed that IFI will continue to implement a stock management programme for the entire Corrib catchment, in line with its current policy,” he added.

The minister also welcomed confirmation by IFI that the results of a fish population survey of the Owenriff system, which was undertaken during the summer of 2017, will be reported on in January 2018.

Dr Cathal Gallagher, head of research and development at IFI, said: “We have listened to local stakeholders and staff in relation to threats posed to salmon and trout populations in the Owenriff, a tributary of Lough Corrib.

“To understand the scale of the issues reported and to support evidence-based management, Inland Fisheries Ireland conducted a fish population survey in late June and late July 2017. We have since worked in the laboratory and with relevant analytical tools to understand the dynamics of the fish stocks in this catchment.

“We have also reviewed mitigation actions that could be taken to restore damage incurred by specific stocks. A proposed rehabilitation plan for the system will be delivered in parallel to the fish stock survey report.”

As part of its research into fish population in the Owenriff system, IFI surveyed 17 river sites and two lakes using standard fish population sampling methods.

IFI staff are currently analysing the data and comparing it to data from previous surveys and neighbouring catchments to determine the status of the fish stocks and to assess change.

A fish stock survey report, which will be available in January, will document important metrics including fish species richness, fish abundance, length frequency, age and growth, and fish ecological status.

Supported by analysis of the survey results, and taking account of the ecology of specific systems, IFI says it will deliver a detailed plan which will focus on the rehabilitation of endangered fish populations in this important catchment.

This will include plans to maintain the genetic diversity of salmon and trout stocks in the Owenriff catchment.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Minister for Communications, Climate Action and Environment, Denis Naughten has officially launched new angling developments at the Golden Mile in Athlone, Co Westmeath and at Lough Acalla in Co Galway.

These works were completed under the National Strategy for Angling Development (NSAD) and greatly enhance the angling infrastructure in both counties, according to Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI).

The wheelchair-accessible angling structures at Lough Acalla comprise floating fishing stands and a connecting bridge to provide for all-year-round fishing.

Total investment in Athlone amounted to €73,000 to build up access causeways, remove old wooden structures and design, manufacture and fit the three floating angling stands.

IFI worked with the local angling clubs, the relevant statutory agencies and contractors in the design and construction of these new floating platforms.

The works form part of a wider development at the Burgess Park and Meadows area, involving Athlone Municipal District, Waterways Ireland, National Parks and Wildlife Service, ESB Fisheries and Athlone Midlands and District Anglers.

At the Lough Acalla development, two large old wooden angling stands were removed and replaced with a fixed concrete catwalk and floating galvanised angling stand.

A new path was also constructed from a set down area in the existing carpark, providing wheelchair accessibility to the entire structure.

IFI worked with anglers and landowners throughout the project to deliver this key piece of infrastructure at this important trout fishery.

Together with other development works at Emlaghroyan, the total development in this River Suck project was €87,000.

Speaking in Athlone after the ribbon-cutting ceremony, Minister Naughten said: “These much needed new developments will add considerably to the angling infrastructure in the upper and mid-Shannon regions, ensuring accessibility for all anglers.

“This investment will play a key role in boosting tourism to the Lakelands region and ensure our valuable natural resources are protected.”

Published in Angling

#Angling - Three new angling bye-laws have been introduced in the Eastern River Basin District by Minister of State with responsibility for Inland Fisheries, Sean Kyne.

Conservation of Coarse Fish and Pike Dundalk District (Lough Muckno) Bye-law No 950, 2017 has been introduced for Lough Muckno, near Castleblaney in Co Monaghan.

This bye-law provides for catch and release for all coarse fish and pike on the lough. Anglers must use keep nets to hold any coarse fish or pike and all fish are to be subsequently released.

The regulations apply to Lough Muckno including Gas Lake and the waters up to Derrygreevy Bridge, the tributary up to Frankfort Bridge, County Water up to Wallace’s Bridge and the Clarebane River up to Clarebane Bridge.

On Lough Lene in Collinstown, Co Westmeath, the Annual Close Season Bye-law No 322, 2017 now applies.

This new bye-law has extended the open season such that anglers fishing for brown trout or rainbow trout can now fish from 1 March until 12 October.

On the River Vartry in Co Wicklow, the River Vartry System (Conservation Bag Limit) Bye-law No 952, 2017 has been introduced.

An angler is now permitted to take one sea trout (40cm or less) per day from the river during the open season, which runs from 1 March to 30 September. The River Vartry is closed for fishing for salmon and sea trout over 40cm.

All three bye-laws came into effect on 1 October 2017.

Inland Fisheries Ireland’s Dublin director Brian Beckett said: “These new bye-laws are designed to protect and conserve a range of fish species while supporting important angling amenity activities within the Eastern River Basin District.

“These fish populations are valuable from a number of perspectives including biological diversity and angling amenity and Inland Fisheries Ireland hope that these measures serve to reinforce the importance of protecting and conserving all our fisheries in the future.”

Published in Angling

#Angling - An international fisheries biologist has suggested a novel approach to boosting numbers of wild Atlantic salmon in Irish rivers — by moving wild fry from more abundant areas to weaker spots within a catchment.

Dr Kyle Young, a research associate from the University of Zurich, was recently invited to give a presentation as part of the Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) Research Seminar Series, at which he outlined his proposal for translocation of salmon fry.

Natural survival bottlenecks are experienced by Atlantic salmon through each stage of its lifecycle, from egg to fry, fry to parr, parr to smolt and so on, he outlined. Under natural conditions, the vast majority of wild salmon fry do not survive to become parr.

These so called “doomed majorities” can be present in sections of rivers with an initial abundance of emergent salmon fry, whose subsequent population size is constrained by density-dependent mortality and by the carrying capacity of the habitat.

Dr Young proposes that such fry could be translocated from these areas to low or non-productive sections of the same river where suitable habitat is present, in an effort to potentially boost the overall production of native wild salmon populations.

This approach may minimise the unintended negative consequences of more conventional salmon stocking programmes where wild salmon broodstock are taken from spawning areas and eggs fertilised in the hatchery.

Hatchery-origin fish are also typically less well-adapted to thrive than their wild compatriots and the overall fitness of the wild component of a population may be compromised through lower overall survival, interbreeding and competition for resources with stocked fish.

IFI’s head of R&D Dr Cathal Gallagher said: “We were delighted to welcome Dr Young to our headquarters in Citywest to further explore the potential of this novel proposal to boost wild Atlantic salmon populations.

“This iconic species is of both major conservation and socio-economic importance to Ireland. Although wild salmon are widely distributed in Irish freshwaters, their long-term sustainability remains under continued threat from a variety of factors. These include habitat degradation, issues related to aquaculture, oceanic and climatic change, pollution, illegal fishing and over-fishing.”

Following the seminar, Dr Young visited the National Salmonid Index Catchment (NSIC) at the River Erriff, the Galway Salmon Fishery and the Cong hatchery facility to further discuss his theorised approach to salmon stocking with IFI management, field staff and researchers.

IFI are discussing the possibility of undertaking experimental trials with this novel approach to boost juvenile salmon production upstream of their trapping facilities in the Erriff catchment.

Published in Angling

#Angling - Inland Fisheries Ireland (IFI) has spoken out over anglers' fears of the threat of pike to wild brown trout numbers.

Earlier this week, the Connacht Angling Council launched a campaign and online petition in an effort to provoke action its members argue is necessary to protect brown trout numbers from “predator” pike in Lough Corrib, Lough Mask and other lakes in the region.

However, in a statement released yesterday (Thursday 21 September), IFI said it was “regrettable that stakeholder groups are campaigning and taking unilateral action”.

The fisheries body argues that the main representative groups for both trout and pike angling are “already part of the inclusive review process”, and gave oral submissions earlier this year as part of last winter’s public consultation on pike management in wild brown trout fisheries, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

“At this time, no conclusions or recommendations have been made. It is important that the [Management of Pike in Designated Wild Brown Trout Fisheries Policy] Review Group, with inputs from all stakeholders, is facilitated in completing its work,” the statement added.

“Given the strongly held views of the two angling stakeholder groups involved, trout anglers and pike anglers, it is IFI’s view that consensus will only be achieved if representatives from both groups participate in a constructive and respectful way in the current process, and away from mainstream and social media.”

Published in Angling
Page 11 of 26

Ireland's Commercial Fishing 

The Irish Commercial Fishing Industry employs around 11,000 people in fishing, processing and ancillary services such as sales and marketing. The industry is worth about €1.22 billion annually to the Irish economy. Irish fisheries products are exported all over the world as far as Africa, Japan and China.

FAQs

Over 16,000 people are employed directly or indirectly around the coast, working on over 2,000 registered fishing vessels, in over 160 seafood processing businesses and in 278 aquaculture production units, according to the State's sea fisheries development body Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM).

All activities that are concerned with growing, catching, processing or transporting fish are part of the commercial fishing industry, the development of which is overseen by BIM. Recreational fishing, as in angling at sea or inland, is the responsibility of Inland Fisheries Ireland.

The Irish fishing industry is valued at 1.22 billion euro in gross domestic product (GDP), according to 2019 figures issued by BIM. Only 179 of Ireland's 2,000 vessels are over 18 metres in length. Where does Irish commercially caught fish come from? Irish fish and shellfish is caught or cultivated within the 200-mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ), but Irish fishing grounds are part of the common EU "blue" pond. Commercial fishing is regulated under the terms of the EU Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983 and with ten-yearly reviews.

The total value of seafood landed into Irish ports was 424 million euro in 2019, according to BIM. High value landings identified in 2019 were haddock, hake, monkfish and megrim. Irish vessels also land into foreign ports, while non-Irish vessels land into Irish ports, principally Castletownbere, Co Cork, and Killybegs, Co Donegal.

There are a number of different methods for catching fish, with technological advances meaning skippers have detailed real time information at their disposal. Fisheries are classified as inshore, midwater, pelagic or deep water. Inshore targets species close to shore and in depths of up to 200 metres, and may include trawling and gillnetting and long-lining. Trawling is regarded as "active", while "passive" or less environmentally harmful fishing methods include use of gill nets, long lines, traps and pots. Pelagic fisheries focus on species which swim close to the surface and up to depths of 200 metres, including migratory mackerel, and tuna, and methods for catching include pair trawling, purse seining, trolling and longlining. Midwater fisheries target species at depths of around 200 metres, using trawling, longlining and jigging. Deepwater fisheries mainly use trawling for species which are found at depths of over 600 metres.

There are several segments for different catching methods in the registered Irish fleet – the largest segment being polyvalent or multi-purpose vessels using several types of gear which may be active and passive. The polyvalent segment ranges from small inshore vessels engaged in netting and potting to medium and larger vessels targeting whitefish, pelagic (herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting) species and bivalve molluscs. The refrigerated seawater (RSW) pelagic segment is engaged mainly in fishing for herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting only. The beam trawling segment focuses on flatfish such as sole and plaice. The aquaculture segment is exclusively for managing, developing and servicing fish farming areas and can collect spat from wild mussel stocks.

The top 20 species landed by value in 2019 were mackerel (78 million euro); Dublin Bay prawn (59 million euro); horse mackerel (17 million euro); monkfish (17 million euro); brown crab (16 million euro); hake (11 million euro); blue whiting (10 million euro); megrim (10 million euro); haddock (9 million euro); tuna (7 million euro); scallop (6 million euro); whelk (5 million euro); whiting (4 million euro); sprat (3 million euro); herring (3 million euro); lobster (2 million euro); turbot (2 million euro); cod (2 million euro); boarfish (2 million euro).

Ireland has approximately 220 million acres of marine territory, rich in marine biodiversity. A marine biodiversity scheme under Ireland's operational programme, which is co-funded by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and the Government, aims to reduce the impact of fisheries and aquaculture on the marine environment, including avoidance and reduction of unwanted catch.

EU fisheries ministers hold an annual pre-Christmas council in Brussels to decide on total allowable catches and quotas for the following year. This is based on advice from scientific bodies such as the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. In Ireland's case, the State's Marine Institute publishes an annual "stock book" which provides the most up to date stock status and scientific advice on over 60 fish stocks exploited by the Irish fleet. Total allowable catches are supplemented by various technical measures to control effort, such as the size of net mesh for various species.

The west Cork harbour of Castletownbere is Ireland's biggest whitefish port. Killybegs, Co Donegal is the most important port for pelagic (herring, mackerel, blue whiting) landings. Fish are also landed into Dingle, Co Kerry, Rossaveal, Co Galway, Howth, Co Dublin and Dunmore East, Co Waterford, Union Hall, Co Cork, Greencastle, Co Donegal, and Clogherhead, Co Louth. The busiest Northern Irish ports are Portavogie, Ardglass and Kilkeel, Co Down.

Yes, EU quotas are allocated to other fleets within the Irish EEZ, and Ireland has long been a transhipment point for fish caught by the Spanish whitefish fleet in particular. Dingle, Co Kerry has seen an increase in foreign landings, as has Castletownbere. The west Cork port recorded foreign landings of 36 million euro or 48 per cent in 2019, and has long been nicknamed the "peseta" port, due to the presence of Spanish-owned transhipment plant, Eiranova, on Dinish island.

Most fish and shellfish caught or cultivated in Irish waters is for the export market, and this was hit hard from the early stages of this year's Covid-19 pandemic. The EU, Asia and Britain are the main export markets, while the middle Eastern market is also developing and the African market has seen a fall in value and volume, according to figures for 2019 issued by BIM.

Fish was once a penitential food, eaten for religious reasons every Friday. BIM has worked hard over several decades to develop its appeal. Ireland is not like Spain – our land is too good to transform us into a nation of fish eaters, but the obvious health benefits are seeing a growth in demand. Seafood retail sales rose by one per cent in 2019 to 300 million euro. Salmon and cod remain the most popular species, while BIM reports an increase in sales of haddock, trout and the pangasius or freshwater catfish which is cultivated primarily in Vietnam and Cambodia and imported by supermarkets here.

The EU's Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983, pooled marine resources – with Ireland having some of the richest grounds and one of the largest sea areas at the time, but only receiving four per cent of allocated catch by a quota system. A system known as the "Hague Preferences" did recognise the need to safeguard the particular needs of regions where local populations are especially dependent on fisheries and related activities. The State's Sea Fisheries Protection Authority, based in Clonakilty, Co Cork, works with the Naval Service on administering the EU CFP. The Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine and Department of Transport regulate licensing and training requirements, while the Marine Survey Office is responsible for the implementation of all national and international legislation in relation to safety of shipping and the prevention of pollution.

Yes, a range of certificates of competency are required for skippers and crew. Training is the remit of BIM, which runs two national fisheries colleges at Greencastle, Co Donegal and Castletownbere, Co Cork. There have been calls for the colleges to be incorporated into the third-level structure of education, with qualifications recognised as such.

Safety is always an issue, in spite of technological improvements, as fishing is a hazardous occupation and climate change is having its impact on the severity of storms at sea. Fishing skippers and crews are required to hold a number of certificates of competency, including safety and navigation, and wearing of personal flotation devices is a legal requirement. Accidents come under the remit of the Marine Casualty Investigation Board, and the Health and Safety Authority. The MCIB does not find fault or blame, but will make recommendations to the Minister for Transport to avoid a recurrence of incidents.

Fish are part of a marine ecosystem and an integral part of the marine food web. Changing climate is having a negative impact on the health of the oceans, and there have been more frequent reports of warmer water species being caught further and further north in Irish waters.

Brexit, Covid 19, EU policies and safety – Britain is a key market for Irish seafood, and 38 per cent of the Irish catch is taken from the waters around its coast. Ireland's top two species – mackerel and prawns - are 60 per cent and 40 per cent, respectively, dependent on British waters. Also, there are serious fears within the Irish industry about the impact of EU vessels, should they be expelled from British waters, opting to focus even more efforts on Ireland's rich marine resource. Covid-19 has forced closure of international seafood markets, with high value fish sold to restaurants taking a large hit. A temporary tie-up support scheme for whitefish vessels introduced for the summer of 2020 was condemned by industry organisations as "designed to fail".

Sources: Bord Iascaigh Mhara, Marine Institute, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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