Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

BIM Brexit ready

Displaying items by tag: Marine Science News

#BoatyMcBoatface - Sir David Attenborough along with more than 1,000 people attended the keel-laying ceremony of a new £150m polar research vessel at a UK shipyard yesterday.

Construction of RSS Sir David Attenborough was officially started by the world-renowned naturalist and broadcaster, after whom the ship is named. Noting earlier this year the public through an online poll originally had chosen a different name 'Boaty McBoatface' as a clear favourite that proved controversial. The newbuild's robotic underwater vehicle will however be named 'Boaty McBoatface'.

At the ceremonial event at Cammell Laird's shipyard site, Birkenhead in Liverpool City Region, Sir David started the “keel laying” process by initiating the lifting by crane of the first hull unit on to the construction berth. This unit, weighing around 100 tonnes, includes part of the ship’s keel and is the first of 97 units which will be erected to form the entire hull of the research ship.

When the ship sets sail in 2019, the RRS Sir David Attenborough will provide a research base to help scientists tackle some of the most important issues facing humanity, including climate change, future sea level rise and the impact of environmental change on marine life.

Speaking at the ceremony Sir David Attenborough said: “It is an honour to be invited to take part in the keel-laying ceremony. The Polar Regions are not only critical for understanding the natural world but they also have an enormous appeal for journalists, broadcasters and the public.

“I have had several opportunities to experience the power of these places first hand. This new ship will ensure that scientists have access to these enigmatic regions to uncover secrets that we can only imagine at this point. Scientists working on this new ship will inform everyone about our changing world for generations to come.”

 

 

Published in Marine Science

#NewCentre – The Examiner writes that over the weekend, a maritime facility which will power the 'blue economy" was opened in Ringaskiddy, Co Cork, by Taoiseach Enda Kenny.

The 4,700m sq, five-storey Beaufort Building with wave simulators, test tanks, workshops and offices provides Ireland with world-class infrastructure for renewable energy and maritime research.

Named after the Irish hydrographer and globally adopted Beaufort Wind Scale creator, Rear Admiral Francis Beaufort, the Beaufort building will house the headquarters of the multi-institutional home to Science Foundation Ireland's Marine Renewable Energy Ireland and the LIR National Ocean Test Facility.

For more on this new facility located in lower Cork Harbour, the newspaper has a report here.

Published in Marine Science

#BlueEconomy - Dr Peter Heffernan, CEO of the Marine Institute is to be the guest speaker of Cork Chamber's June Business Breakfast on Thursday 25th June in the Clarion Hotel.

The Blue Economy is seen as hugely important for the island of Ireland and Cork is naturally well positioned to reap the benefits of this growth, boasting the second largest natural harbour in the world. Focused around the Ringaskiddy area, the Irish Maritime Research Cluster (IMERC) are at the centre of promoting Ireland as a world renowned maritime and research development location.

It is also the site of the National Maritime College of Ireland, the Irish Naval Service and the UCC Beaufort Laboratory.

Dr Peter Heffernan was appointed as CEO of the Marine Institute in 1994. The Marine Institute is Ireland's National agency for marine Research Technology Development & Innovation (RTDI).

Dr Heffernan obtained PhD in marine science from the National University of Ireland, Galway. He held a post-doctoral position at University of Georgia (USA) in 1985, he has published over 40 scientific papers, has over 20-years of experience in leading marine science policy developments at national, EU and trans-Atlantic levels.

This is an opportunity for Chamber members to get an insight into the huge potential in the marine industry in Ireland and in particular, in the Southern Region.

Members of the public are also invited to the Cork Chamber event where further information, registration and event times are available through this website link HERE.

Published in Marine Science

#SeaforSociety - An open day saw more than 150 children from five schools from Dublin, Cork, Galway, and Mayo visit the Marine Institute's research vessel, the RV Celtic Explorer, as well as Galway Atlantaquaria, as part of the EU FP7 Sea for Society project to raise awareness of our ocean, this week in Galway city.

The Sea for Society collective action aims to shape the concept of a "Blue Society" and improve Europe's understanding on the relation between the ocean and our daily life activities. "As part of the Sea for Society FP7 project in Ireland, we provided the opportunity for children to see and take part in a wide range of activities including meeting with marine scientists, researchers and the Captain of the RV Celtic Explorer, as well as the team from AquaTT and marine experts at the aquarium," explained Cushla Dromgool-Regan, Marine Institute.

On the vessel the children meet with the fisheries research team who showed a wide range of fish from the deep ocean. The seabed mapping researchers showed bathymetry mapping images of key shipwrecks around Ireland as well as the newly discovered submarine mountain ranges mapped by the RV Celtic Explorer on its latest expedition from Newfoundland to Galway.

The remotely operated vehicle ROV Holland I, which is to be used in the vessels next expedition filming cold water corals on the Porcupine bank, was also on display. This
provided a key opportunity for the children to learn about marine history, marine technology well as taking part in some simple experiments demonstrating pressure.

AquaTT also asked the teachers and children to think about the small changes we can make in our lifestyle which have a significant impact on the ocean, such as using less water, eating fish that has been caught sustainably, disposing plastics in a responsible way, to taking part in beach cleans.

Galway Atlantaquaria provided tactile learning opportunities where the students got to touch and see marine animals native to Irish seashores and ocean.

Teachers and pupils alike described the event as a unique and wonderful experience. "I've attended many trips with the school, but this one really stood out. We learned so much, ranging from how phytoplankton in our ocean provide up to 50 percent of the oxygen we breathe, to how to tell the age of a fish using their ear bones - otoliths. Raising awareness of our ocean and the impact that the ocean has on us is so important," said Maire Ni Fhoghlu, from Gaelscoil Uileog de Burca, Claremorris.

The children who attended the open day had taken part in the Marine Institute's Explorers Education Programme which is run by Galway Atlantaquaria, Blackrock Education Centre, SeaLife – Bray and Lifetime Lab in Cork, and is also supported by other education centres in Mayo and Galway.

"The excellent marine activities and projects completed this year by the schools were evident by the enthusiasm and knowledge of the children who visited the Celtic Explorer. For an island nation it is heartening to see that the children are learning about our ocean, understanding the importance of scientific marine research as well as taking personal responsibility for caring for our marine environment," Cushla Dromgool-Regan further said.

The Explorers Education programme also provides a range of cross curricular teaching resources and lesson plans for all primary schools to freely download at www.explorers.ie 

In addition for more details on the programme details click HERE.

Published in Marine Science

#NewUCCcentre – According to a report in the Irish Examiner, University College Cork has been granted permission to facilitate site works for the development of a major maritime research centre on the southside of Cork harbour.

The university applied at the end of July for the works, on a site of 15 acres next to Cork Institute of Technology's National Maritime College of Ireland, (which held it's Open Day on Tuesday this week) in Ringaskiddy.

The development also adjoins the under-construction Beaufort Laboratory, for which permission was given on foot of a 2011 application to Cork County Council. For more details among a series of projects listed under planning notes, click HERE.

 

 

Published in Marine Science

#INFOMARseminar- The annual INFOMAR Seminar is to take place in Waterford City over the course of two-days (22-23 October) at the Tower Hotel opposite the city's landmark Reginald Tower.

The seminar will include an update on Ireland's national seabed mapping programme featuring survey operations and coverage, future plans, associated research along with poster sessions. To register for a free place at the seminar, click HERE

INFOMAR which stands for The INtegrated Mapping FOr the Sustainable Development of Ireland's MArine Resource programme is a joint venture between the Geological Survey of Ireland and the Marine Institute.

An area covering some 125,000 km2 of Ireland's most productive and commercially valuable inshore waters is carried out by INFOMAR. They produce integrated mapping products covering the physical, chemical and biological features of the seabed.

The following research vessels operate for INFORMAR the RV Keary, Geo and Cosantóir Bradán.

 

Published in Marine Science

#UnderwaterWaterford – Following our port snapshot of Waterford Harbour shipping this morning which included a dredger, INFOMAR takes us on a 3D-fly-through of the estuary (in reverse direction) showing the seabed as its winds its way upriver to the city, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 3D imagery shows (click link, scroll down and enlarge video) the varying depths and channel widths of the shipping lane along Waterford estuary taken from the research vessel, the RV Keary.

As mentioned above this is where a dredging campaign is currently underway, notably for ships using Belview Por, the main terminal facility of the Port of Waterford Company which has contracted WD Mersey (1983/1,696grt) to carry out the work.

Since late last month dredging operations along the estuary has involved the spoil to be dumped south-west off Hook Head.

As for the role of RV Keary this took place in 2011 and was the first INFOMAR survey leg to be carried out by the South African built aluminium constructed catamaran. The survey took two-months to complete and was conducted in preparation to hosting the second Tall Ships Festival held that year.

The seabed survey mapping of RV Keary concentrated on the navigational channel while the surrounding shallower waters were tasked to a smaller RIB based craft, RV Geo. Together this was the first occasion the pair of GSI vessels worked on a survey.

The 15m RV Keary is a state-run marine research survey vessel commissioned for and operated by the Geological Survey of Ireland (GSI). As reported in 2012, the Central Fisheries Board cutter Cosantoir Bradan was chartered by GSI in an RV role.

The vessels primary function is to provide an inshore survey capability for the national INtegrated Mapping FOr the Sustainable Development of Ireland's MArine Resource - in short INFOMAR.

In addition assistance in the INFOMAR programme which is funded by the Department of Communications, Energy and Natural Resources, is also made available from the Marine Institute's pair of research vessels, RV Celtic Voyager and larger fleetmate RV Celtic Explorer.

To keep track of GSI vessels current locations, click this map-link.

Published in Ports & Shipping

#EurOCEAN – CEO of the Marine Institute, Dr Peter Heffernan yesterday welcomed the announcement of the EurOCEAN 2014 Conference in Rome recalling the very successful EurOCEAN 2004 Galway Conference and the 2004 Galway Declaration on Marine Science & Technology.

The Galway Declaration, and subsequent EurOCEAN Conference Declarations (Aberdeen, 2007 and Ostend, 2010), have made significant contributions to the EU's Marine Research Agenda and the Integrated Maritime Policy for the European Union (2007). He looked forward to an equally influential Declaration from the Rome Conference.

EurOCEAN 2014 (7th – 9th October 2014, Rome) will bring together marine scientists across the broad range of disciplines with policymakers, industry and NGOs, to develop a common vision on achieving an ecosystem approach to the management of Europe's marine resources as a fundamental requirement for sustainable Blue Growth. Highlighting the importance of Blue Growth and of commercially-driven, problem-oriented research, EurOCEAN 2014 will equally emphasize that a growing and sustainable maritime economy will also require a much greater knowledge and understanding of marine ecosystem functioning and resilience.

For 2.5 days EurOCEAN 2014 cover a combination of plenary sessions and parallel workshops, organized around societal, policy and regional challenges. The conference programme will reflect the high-level messages of the European Marine Board's Navigating the Future-IV Foresight Report.

The EurOCEAN 2014 conference is part of the successful EurOCEAN Conference Series initiated in late 1990s to provide a regular focal point for the marine and maritime research community and stakeholders to interact with European and member state policymakers and programme managers, to discuss and respond to new marine science and technology developments, challenges and opportunities.

EurOCEAN 2014 is an official event of the Italian EU Presidency and is co-organized by the European Marine Board, European Commission and the Italian EMB members, CNRS, OGS and CoNISMA.

For further information see: http://eurocean2014.eu/

 

Published in Marine Science
8th October 2013

INFOMAR Annual Seminar 2013

#INFOMARseminar – A two-day INFOMAR seminar hosted by the Geological Survey of Ireland and the Marine Institute is to start tomorrow (Wednesday 9 October) in Limerick City.

Integrated Mapping for the Sustainable Development of Ireland's Marine Resources (INFOMAR) is a joint venture between the Geological Survey of Ireland and the Marine Institute. The programme is the successor to the Irish National Seabed Survey.

INFOMAR covers some 125,000 km² of Irelands most productive and commercially valuable inshore waters.

The annual INFOMAR conference will see seminar delegates meet in the Pavilion of the University of Limerick (UL) which is to be hosted by the Mobile & Marine Robotics Research Centre.

The seminar will include an update on Ireland's national seabed mapping programme including survey operations and coverage, future plans, associated research along with poster sessions.

Places to attend the free seminar were made open to all, however registration has now closed as attendance is at capacity.

To request a late registration, contact Kevin Sheehan by email: [email protected], should places become available.

For further information visit: www.eventelephant.com/infomarannualseminar2013

 

Published in Marine Science

#ResearchShipTime – The Marine Institute are calling for applications for those wishing to accept ship-time on board the research vessels RV Celtic Explorer and RV Celtic Voyager in 2014 and 2015.

Applications for ship-time must be submitted using Research Vessel Operations' on-line 'Survey Planning System' (SPS) before 20th September 2013.

Applicants can get further information from the Apply for Ship-time pageApplications for ship-time must be submitted using Research Vessel Operations' on-line 'Survey Planning System' (SPS) before 20th September 2013.

Applicants can get further information from the Apply for Ship-time page on the Marine Institute website www.marine.ie and contact [email protected] to obtain login details to SPS.

Applicants should read The Vessel Charter Guidelines (.doc 256 KB) prior to submitting their application.

Applicants may seek grant-aid to cover all or part of the vessel charter costs.

For information on eligibility for grant-aid and additional application requirements please refer to the Grant-Aid Guidelines

Note: Applications for grant-aid will only be accepted for ship-time in 2014. Applications for grant-aid for ship-time in 2015 will be accepted in 2014.

Persons considering making an application for shiptime for training purposes are advised to consult with Strategic Marine Alliance for Research and Training (SMART) via [email protected]

This marine science partnership programme is designed to standardise and optimise ship based training for 3rd level students and provide nationally accredited ship based training activities.

The RV Celtic Explorer will once again be making transatlantic passages to complete a survey in Newfoundland waters in April 2014 (Westward) and May (Eastward) and a targeted call for applications to utilise these transects is being included in this year's call.

Applications are invited from researchers to utilise to utilise the vessel for up to a 14 day period on the western transect starting in mid-April 2014.

The initiative is planned to coincide with a planned charter survey in Newfoundland waters in April/May 2014 and is a precursor to future transatlantic co-operative research as outlined at the recent Atlantic Strategy meeting which included EU, US and Canadian Partners.

The PIP funding scheme will accept proposals for part funding of shiptime and full funding of associated research. For further information please go to their website: http://www.pip.ie/page/1

 

Published in Marine Science
Page 1 of 3

Ireland's Commercial Fishing 

The Irish Commercial Fishing Industry employs around 11,000 people in fishing, processing and ancillary services such as sales and marketing. The industry is worth about €1.22 billion annually to the Irish economy. Irish fisheries products are exported all over the world as far as Africa, Japan and China.

FAQs

Over 16,000 people are employed directly or indirectly around the coast, working on over 2,000 registered fishing vessels, in over 160 seafood processing businesses and in 278 aquaculture production units, according to the State's sea fisheries development body Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM).

All activities that are concerned with growing, catching, processing or transporting fish are part of the commercial fishing industry, the development of which is overseen by BIM. Recreational fishing, as in angling at sea or inland, is the responsibility of Inland Fisheries Ireland.

The Irish fishing industry is valued at 1.22 billion euro in gross domestic product (GDP), according to 2019 figures issued by BIM. Only 179 of Ireland's 2,000 vessels are over 18 metres in length. Where does Irish commercially caught fish come from? Irish fish and shellfish is caught or cultivated within the 200-mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ), but Irish fishing grounds are part of the common EU "blue" pond. Commercial fishing is regulated under the terms of the EU Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983 and with ten-yearly reviews.

The total value of seafood landed into Irish ports was 424 million euro in 2019, according to BIM. High value landings identified in 2019 were haddock, hake, monkfish and megrim. Irish vessels also land into foreign ports, while non-Irish vessels land into Irish ports, principally Castletownbere, Co Cork, and Killybegs, Co Donegal.

There are a number of different methods for catching fish, with technological advances meaning skippers have detailed real time information at their disposal. Fisheries are classified as inshore, midwater, pelagic or deep water. Inshore targets species close to shore and in depths of up to 200 metres, and may include trawling and gillnetting and long-lining. Trawling is regarded as "active", while "passive" or less environmentally harmful fishing methods include use of gill nets, long lines, traps and pots. Pelagic fisheries focus on species which swim close to the surface and up to depths of 200 metres, including migratory mackerel, and tuna, and methods for catching include pair trawling, purse seining, trolling and longlining. Midwater fisheries target species at depths of around 200 metres, using trawling, longlining and jigging. Deepwater fisheries mainly use trawling for species which are found at depths of over 600 metres.

There are several segments for different catching methods in the registered Irish fleet – the largest segment being polyvalent or multi-purpose vessels using several types of gear which may be active and passive. The polyvalent segment ranges from small inshore vessels engaged in netting and potting to medium and larger vessels targeting whitefish, pelagic (herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting) species and bivalve molluscs. The refrigerated seawater (RSW) pelagic segment is engaged mainly in fishing for herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting only. The beam trawling segment focuses on flatfish such as sole and plaice. The aquaculture segment is exclusively for managing, developing and servicing fish farming areas and can collect spat from wild mussel stocks.

The top 20 species landed by value in 2019 were mackerel (78 million euro); Dublin Bay prawn (59 million euro); horse mackerel (17 million euro); monkfish (17 million euro); brown crab (16 million euro); hake (11 million euro); blue whiting (10 million euro); megrim (10 million euro); haddock (9 million euro); tuna (7 million euro); scallop (6 million euro); whelk (5 million euro); whiting (4 million euro); sprat (3 million euro); herring (3 million euro); lobster (2 million euro); turbot (2 million euro); cod (2 million euro); boarfish (2 million euro).

Ireland has approximately 220 million acres of marine territory, rich in marine biodiversity. A marine biodiversity scheme under Ireland's operational programme, which is co-funded by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and the Government, aims to reduce the impact of fisheries and aquaculture on the marine environment, including avoidance and reduction of unwanted catch.

EU fisheries ministers hold an annual pre-Christmas council in Brussels to decide on total allowable catches and quotas for the following year. This is based on advice from scientific bodies such as the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. In Ireland's case, the State's Marine Institute publishes an annual "stock book" which provides the most up to date stock status and scientific advice on over 60 fish stocks exploited by the Irish fleet. Total allowable catches are supplemented by various technical measures to control effort, such as the size of net mesh for various species.

The west Cork harbour of Castletownbere is Ireland's biggest whitefish port. Killybegs, Co Donegal is the most important port for pelagic (herring, mackerel, blue whiting) landings. Fish are also landed into Dingle, Co Kerry, Rossaveal, Co Galway, Howth, Co Dublin and Dunmore East, Co Waterford, Union Hall, Co Cork, Greencastle, Co Donegal, and Clogherhead, Co Louth. The busiest Northern Irish ports are Portavogie, Ardglass and Kilkeel, Co Down.

Yes, EU quotas are allocated to other fleets within the Irish EEZ, and Ireland has long been a transhipment point for fish caught by the Spanish whitefish fleet in particular. Dingle, Co Kerry has seen an increase in foreign landings, as has Castletownbere. The west Cork port recorded foreign landings of 36 million euro or 48 per cent in 2019, and has long been nicknamed the "peseta" port, due to the presence of Spanish-owned transhipment plant, Eiranova, on Dinish island.

Most fish and shellfish caught or cultivated in Irish waters is for the export market, and this was hit hard from the early stages of this year's Covid-19 pandemic. The EU, Asia and Britain are the main export markets, while the middle Eastern market is also developing and the African market has seen a fall in value and volume, according to figures for 2019 issued by BIM.

Fish was once a penitential food, eaten for religious reasons every Friday. BIM has worked hard over several decades to develop its appeal. Ireland is not like Spain – our land is too good to transform us into a nation of fish eaters, but the obvious health benefits are seeing a growth in demand. Seafood retail sales rose by one per cent in 2019 to 300 million euro. Salmon and cod remain the most popular species, while BIM reports an increase in sales of haddock, trout and the pangasius or freshwater catfish which is cultivated primarily in Vietnam and Cambodia and imported by supermarkets here.

The EU's Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983, pooled marine resources – with Ireland having some of the richest grounds and one of the largest sea areas at the time, but only receiving four per cent of allocated catch by a quota system. A system known as the "Hague Preferences" did recognise the need to safeguard the particular needs of regions where local populations are especially dependent on fisheries and related activities. The State's Sea Fisheries Protection Authority, based in Clonakilty, Co Cork, works with the Naval Service on administering the EU CFP. The Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine and Department of Transport regulate licensing and training requirements, while the Marine Survey Office is responsible for the implementation of all national and international legislation in relation to safety of shipping and the prevention of pollution.

Yes, a range of certificates of competency are required for skippers and crew. Training is the remit of BIM, which runs two national fisheries colleges at Greencastle, Co Donegal and Castletownbere, Co Cork. There have been calls for the colleges to be incorporated into the third-level structure of education, with qualifications recognised as such.

Safety is always an issue, in spite of technological improvements, as fishing is a hazardous occupation and climate change is having its impact on the severity of storms at sea. Fishing skippers and crews are required to hold a number of certificates of competency, including safety and navigation, and wearing of personal flotation devices is a legal requirement. Accidents come under the remit of the Marine Casualty Investigation Board, and the Health and Safety Authority. The MCIB does not find fault or blame, but will make recommendations to the Minister for Transport to avoid a recurrence of incidents.

Fish are part of a marine ecosystem and an integral part of the marine food web. Changing climate is having a negative impact on the health of the oceans, and there have been more frequent reports of warmer water species being caught further and further north in Irish waters.

Brexit, Covid 19, EU policies and safety – Britain is a key market for Irish seafood, and 38 per cent of the Irish catch is taken from the waters around its coast. Ireland's top two species – mackerel and prawns - are 60 per cent and 40 per cent, respectively, dependent on British waters. Also, there are serious fears within the Irish industry about the impact of EU vessels, should they be expelled from British waters, opting to focus even more efforts on Ireland's rich marine resource. Covid-19 has forced closure of international seafood markets, with high value fish sold to restaurants taking a large hit. A temporary tie-up support scheme for whitefish vessels introduced for the summer of 2020 was condemned by industry organisations as "designed to fail".

Sources: Bord Iascaigh Mhara, Marine Institute, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Car Brands

subaru sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton dob
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton
quantum sidebutton
watson sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
wavelengths sidebutton
 

Please show your support for Afloat by donating