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Displaying items by tag: Stena Line

#FerryMethanol – Classification society Lloyd's Register (LR) is set to class Sweden-based Stena Line's ferry Stena Germanica, claimed to be world's first methanol-powered sea vessel.

For the conversion of the 240m-long, 1,500-passenger Stena Germanica vessel to methanol propulsion, Stena has collaborated with Wärtsilä, the Port of Gothenburg, the Port of Kiel and Methanex Corporation, the world's largest methanol producer and supplier.

Five LR surveying teams from offices in Copenhagen, Trieste, Gothenburg, Venice and Southampton, have already overseen preliminary tests on a methanol-modified Wartsila engine 6ZAL40S that is similar to the one to be fitted on Germanica.

For more on this report visit: Ship-Technology.com

Published in Ferry

#RouteFuture? – There are growing fears that Stena Line may next year pull out of Dún Laoghaire, Co Dublin, in a move that sources estimate could cost the harbour company €7 million, reports The Irish Times. 

Stena recently announced it would not run its (HSS) high-speed ferry service between Dún Laoghaire and Holyhead in Wales over Christmas for "commercial and operational reasons".

Concerns have since emerged that it intends to pull out of Dún Laoghaire altogether and will not next year resume the service it normally operates from the port during the summer.

When Stena said it would not operate the Christmas holiday service, it noted it was in talks with the south Dublin harbour company in relation to providing the summer service next year.

Both sides say those negotiations are continuing. It is understood they are due to meet again for further talks in the near future.

Stena's withdrawal would be a major blow to Dún Laoghaire Harbour. Sources estimate that Stena's business is worth €7 million a year to the company, which lost €890,000 in 2013.

For more on this story, click HERE.

 

#StenaSailings – Stena Line's Belfast-Cairnryan sailings are according to their website operating albeit not to a full schedule, following an incident involving a ferry colliding at the Scottish port earlier this week, writes Jehan Ashmore.

As previously reported, Stena Line said no passengers or crew on board Stena Superfast VII were injured in the incident which they also cited was not weather related.

Some sailings however are cancelled and other remains in doubt. Those booked or intending to travel can contact Stena Line ferrycheck on 087 05 755 755 in addition to confirming latest sailing information in either direction, by clicking this link HERE

Of the North Channel route's two serving sisters, Stena Superfast VII on Tuesday had collided with the dock at Cairnryan, the £80m terminal at Loch Ryan Port which opened in 2011.

The 30,000 tonnes ferry had been making a scheduled docking procedure at the port when contact was made with the fenders. This resulted in the ship remaining moored at the terminal while a full inspection was carried out.

 

Published in Ferry

#CancelledSailings - UT.V News reports the ferry from Belfast to Cairnryan collided with the dock at the Scottish port around 6am on Tuesday.

Stena Line said no passengers or crew were injured.

It also said the incident was not weather related.

As a result sailings have been suspended until at least 7.30pm today (to confirm see link to Stena website below).

Stena Line said its decision on sailings after that time will be communicated to customers as early as possible.

A spokeswoman added: "During a scheduled docking procedure at Loch Ryan Port Stena Line's Superfast VII vessel made contact with the fenders which has resulted in the ship remaining moored at the port while a full inspection is carried out.

For more on this story click HERE.

Those booked or intending to travel can contact Stena Line by telephone and by checking the latest sailing information from this LINK.

Published in Ferry

#StenaSuperfastX – Amid much speculation the deployment of Stena Superfast X to Dublin-Holyhead route in early 2015 as previously reported on Afloat.ie has been finally confirmed by Stena Line.

The 29,800 tonnes ropax ferry will bring increased capacity as she will replace the route's existing smaller Stena Nordica which currently serves alongside Stena Adventurer.

Stena Superfast X is a sister ship of Stena Superfast VII and VIII that currently operate on the Irish Sea on the Belfast-Cairnryan route.

The introduction of Stena Superfast X as the new second ship on the Dublin-Holyhead service will see the vessel providing capacity for up to 1,200 passengers and almost 2 kms of lane space to accommodate a mix of car and freight traffic.

Ian Davies, Stena Line's Route Manager (Irish Sea South) said: "Providing additional capacity and facilities to expand our Dublin- Holyhead route is an important strategic development for Stena Line on the Irish Sea at this time. Our freight and travel customers will now be able to benefit from an enhanced service on this key trade and tourism gateway at a time when commercial and leisure traffic between Ireland and Britain are showing really encouraging signs of future growth.

Ian added: "By introducing a much larger ship onto the route, we are demonstrating our confidence and commitment to a trade and tourism gateway which will play a key part in helping to drive forward the economies on both sides of the Irish Sea. In the last 5 years alone Stena Line has invested over £250m across its Irish Sea operations and we are confident that the improving economic climate in Ireland and Britain will show that this significant resource commitment has been extremely well timed. As the major tourism gateway into Ireland it is important that Dublin benefits from the best possible transport links. We are looking forward to our enhanced passenger service into Dublin in 2015 playing its part in helping to drive up visitor numbers next year and in the years ahead."

Superfast X as previously reported is being fully modified by McGregor, who are converting the vessel to increase vehicle capacity understood to be closer to her original configuration before she takes up her position on the Dublin-Holyhead service.

The vessel will have a range of facilities including dedicated passenger and freight driver lounges, Barista Coffee House, Met Bar and Grill, a retail shopping outlet and other areas for passengers to relax and enjoy including a premium lounge.

 

Published in Ferry

#CancelledHSSsailings – Stena Line have cancelled HSS fast-craft Dun Laoghaire-Holyhead sailings over the Christmas and New Year periods, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The decision to withdraw the scheduled sailings is only a month before the busy festive season from when sailings were due to start on 20 December and run up to early January 2015.

In response to Afloat.ie a statement was issued on behalf of Stena Line "In recent years Stena Line has deployed the HSS for a few days over the Christmas holiday period on its Holyhead-Dun Laoghaire service. For commercial and operational reasons the company has decided not to reactivate the vessel this year for the short Christmas holiday period. Customers who have already booked on the service will be accommodated on other sailings best suited to their travel requirements."

The statement added "Stena Line is currently engaged in ongoing discussions with Dun Laoghaire Harbour in relation to the provision of a seasonal fast craft service in 2015."

There has been widespread speculation in recent years over the future of the HSS service and that of the loss-making route. In addition the fast-craft which is expensive to run has for the last four years operated to a summer-only service between April to September.

This latest development of cancelled Dun Laoghaire route sailings over the festive season follows a previous report on Afloat.ie regarding Stena Line's route from neighbouring Dublin Port. A contractor to Stena Line, that is converting the ro-pax Stena Superfast X stated that she is to be deployed on the Dublin-Holyhead route in January 2015.

Stena Line confirmed their position as to the route deployment of the Stena Superfast X in which she will either be used within their network or that she may be chartered to a third party operator.

 

Published in Ferry

#StenaSimilarities- Stena Line which operates services throughout Northern Europe including the Gothenburg-Frederikshavn route has seen the return to service of Stena Jutlandica, the ro-pax having undergone maintenance, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Last Saturday Stena Jutlandica (1996/29,691grt) resumed the 3 hour 15 minute Kattegat route between Sweden and Denmark. She strongly resembles Irish Ferries Isle of Inishmore (1997/34,031grt) which serves on the slightly longer 4 hour St. Georges Channel Rosslare-Pembroke route.

The reason for the design similarities is that Stena Jutlandica and Isle of Inishmore were both launched from Van der Geissen-de Noord, Rotterdam. The Dutch yard no longer exists.

During the four-day absence of 'Jutlandica', there was no replacement of the ferry, though route fleetmates Stena Danica (conventional ferry) and Stena Scanrail (train-ferry) provided additional sailings.

A fourth route ferry the Stena Carisma was only withdrawn from service earlier this year. The Westamarin built HSS 900 fast craft from Norway is a smaller version of the trio of Finnyards built HSS 1500 fast-craft.

The first of the revolutionary trio, Stena Explorer is unique in that she is the only HSS member left and of any fast-craft design ferry in the extensive company's fleet.

As previously reported, Stena Explorer is to resume Christmas period sailings on selected dates in December on the Dun Laoghaire-Holyhead route. In addition she is to operate some sailings in the New Year during early January.

Her former Irish Sea running mate, Stena Voyager became redundant on the North Channel's Belfast-Stranrear before a switch of Scottish terminal. Last year she was towed to Sweden where a subsidiary of the ferry company, Stena Recycling undertook dismantling the fast-craft ferry.

The third of the trio, Stena Discovery served on the longest route operated by a HSS craft, that been Harwich-Hook van Holland. She was sold to Venezuelan interests and the craft is understood to have never entered service.

 

Published in Ferry

#StenaSuperfastX Furthermore to a previous report over rumours that Stena Line are to deploy the Stena Superfast X onto the Dublin-Holyhead route in early 2015, following conversion work contracted to MacGregor, Afloat.ie has contacted the ferry company to comment, writes Jehan Ashmore.

MacGregor, part of Cargotec Corporation announced that they received a contract from Stena to convert the 29,800gt ropax ferry (currently named Dieppe Seaways) to optimise it for its new route between Dublin and Holyhead.

In response Peter Arvidsson Director Network & Fleet at Stena Line said "Although it is correct that MacGregor has been appointed by Stena RoRo to return the vessel to its original configuration, where the vessel will be deployed is currently a matter for ongoing discussion. From Stena Line's perspective it is possible that the Superfast X will be used within the Stena Line network or she may be chartered to a third party operator, but no decision has yet been taken".

It is understood that work is to begin once the charter of Dieppe Seaways running for DFDS Seaways Dover-Calais service ceases this month.

MacGregor's is to return the ro-pax ferry to its original configuration as dictated by expected requirements. This will involve the delivery of ro-ro cargo access equipment, including the design and installation of bow doors, a bow ramp, a new watertight door and a stern ramp.

Should the 'Superfast X' be introduced on the important Dublin-Holyhead route, she would provide an increase in passenger and freight capacity on the central corridor link. In addition she would be a closer match to the route's ro-pax Stena Adventurer, though not her running mate, the smaller Stena Nordica.

Stena Line's other Dublin Bay service from Dun Laoghaire to Holyhead has operated its fourth consecutive summer-only season which ended in early September. The route is served by the fuel thirsty and expensive to operate HSS Stena Explorer.

In efforts to stave off steep rise in fuel costs in recent years on the loss making route, Stena Line have reduced HSS sailings to a single daily round trip and increased crossings times from 99 minutes to 2 hours 20 minutes.

In response to Afloat.ie on the future of Dun Laoghaire-Holyhead route? Stena Line commented that the HSS is scheduled to return for the Christmas period (as previously reported) and is also scheduled for seasonal service 2015.

 

Published in Ferry

#StenaSuperfastX – According to Ships Monthly, Stena Line remain tight-lipped about the deployment of 29,800 tonnes ferry which is to join their fleet early in 2015.

Although an appearance on the Irish Sea service between Holyhead and Dublin has been rumoured for several months, neither Stena's head office in Gothenburg, nor Irish Sea management had made any announcement before the end of September.

MacGregor, part of Cargotec, say they have been contracted to provide a complete turnkey delivery of ro-ro cargo access equipment for the vessel, including the design and installation of bow doors, a bow ramp, a new watertight door and a stern ramp, and seem to be in no doubt that Stena Superfast X will be making an Irish Sea debut from Holyhead next January.

For more on this story click HERE.

Afloat.ie adds that should Stena Superfast X be introduced on the core Dublin-Holyhead central corridor route, she would be the third sister from an original quartet (built for Greek operator Superfast Ferries) to operate for Stena Line on the Irish Sea.

The existing Irish Sea 'Superfast' pair are Stena Superfast VII and VIII which operate Belfast-Cairnryan services having been introduced three years ago this month on a North Channel route. The route from Belfast to the Scottish port was switched from Stranrear to a new £80m port at Cairnryan.

 

Published in Ferry

#HSSresumes – Stena Line sailings will resume on the Dun Laoghaire-Holyhead route for the Christmas Season and early New Year period. The HSS fast-craft Stena Explorer returns to service having ceased summer sailings in early September.

Stena Explorer will sail over the Christmas period on the following dates, December 20th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th, 27th, 28th, 29th, 30th and in January on the 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th.

Crossing times on the Ireland-Wales route takes 2 hours and 20 minutes. A single round trip is made on each of the selected sailings dates. For further information, including the sailing schedule, visit the Stena Line website HERE.

 

Published in Ferry
Page 7 of 18

Ireland's Commercial Fishing 

The Irish Commercial Fishing Industry employs around 11,000 people in fishing, processing and ancillary services such as sales and marketing. The industry is worth about €1.22 billion annually to the Irish economy. Irish fisheries products are exported all over the world as far as Africa, Japan and China.

FAQs

Over 16,000 people are employed directly or indirectly around the coast, working on over 2,000 registered fishing vessels, in over 160 seafood processing businesses and in 278 aquaculture production units, according to the State's sea fisheries development body Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM).

All activities that are concerned with growing, catching, processing or transporting fish are part of the commercial fishing industry, the development of which is overseen by BIM. Recreational fishing, as in angling at sea or inland, is the responsibility of Inland Fisheries Ireland.

The Irish fishing industry is valued at 1.22 billion euro in gross domestic product (GDP), according to 2019 figures issued by BIM. Only 179 of Ireland's 2,000 vessels are over 18 metres in length. Where does Irish commercially caught fish come from? Irish fish and shellfish is caught or cultivated within the 200-mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ), but Irish fishing grounds are part of the common EU "blue" pond. Commercial fishing is regulated under the terms of the EU Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983 and with ten-yearly reviews.

The total value of seafood landed into Irish ports was 424 million euro in 2019, according to BIM. High value landings identified in 2019 were haddock, hake, monkfish and megrim. Irish vessels also land into foreign ports, while non-Irish vessels land into Irish ports, principally Castletownbere, Co Cork, and Killybegs, Co Donegal.

There are a number of different methods for catching fish, with technological advances meaning skippers have detailed real time information at their disposal. Fisheries are classified as inshore, midwater, pelagic or deep water. Inshore targets species close to shore and in depths of up to 200 metres, and may include trawling and gillnetting and long-lining. Trawling is regarded as "active", while "passive" or less environmentally harmful fishing methods include use of gill nets, long lines, traps and pots. Pelagic fisheries focus on species which swim close to the surface and up to depths of 200 metres, including migratory mackerel, and tuna, and methods for catching include pair trawling, purse seining, trolling and longlining. Midwater fisheries target species at depths of around 200 metres, using trawling, longlining and jigging. Deepwater fisheries mainly use trawling for species which are found at depths of over 600 metres.

There are several segments for different catching methods in the registered Irish fleet – the largest segment being polyvalent or multi-purpose vessels using several types of gear which may be active and passive. The polyvalent segment ranges from small inshore vessels engaged in netting and potting to medium and larger vessels targeting whitefish, pelagic (herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting) species and bivalve molluscs. The refrigerated seawater (RSW) pelagic segment is engaged mainly in fishing for herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting only. The beam trawling segment focuses on flatfish such as sole and plaice. The aquaculture segment is exclusively for managing, developing and servicing fish farming areas and can collect spat from wild mussel stocks.

The top 20 species landed by value in 2019 were mackerel (78 million euro); Dublin Bay prawn (59 million euro); horse mackerel (17 million euro); monkfish (17 million euro); brown crab (16 million euro); hake (11 million euro); blue whiting (10 million euro); megrim (10 million euro); haddock (9 million euro); tuna (7 million euro); scallop (6 million euro); whelk (5 million euro); whiting (4 million euro); sprat (3 million euro); herring (3 million euro); lobster (2 million euro); turbot (2 million euro); cod (2 million euro); boarfish (2 million euro).

Ireland has approximately 220 million acres of marine territory, rich in marine biodiversity. A marine biodiversity scheme under Ireland's operational programme, which is co-funded by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and the Government, aims to reduce the impact of fisheries and aquaculture on the marine environment, including avoidance and reduction of unwanted catch.

EU fisheries ministers hold an annual pre-Christmas council in Brussels to decide on total allowable catches and quotas for the following year. This is based on advice from scientific bodies such as the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. In Ireland's case, the State's Marine Institute publishes an annual "stock book" which provides the most up to date stock status and scientific advice on over 60 fish stocks exploited by the Irish fleet. Total allowable catches are supplemented by various technical measures to control effort, such as the size of net mesh for various species.

The west Cork harbour of Castletownbere is Ireland's biggest whitefish port. Killybegs, Co Donegal is the most important port for pelagic (herring, mackerel, blue whiting) landings. Fish are also landed into Dingle, Co Kerry, Rossaveal, Co Galway, Howth, Co Dublin and Dunmore East, Co Waterford, Union Hall, Co Cork, Greencastle, Co Donegal, and Clogherhead, Co Louth. The busiest Northern Irish ports are Portavogie, Ardglass and Kilkeel, Co Down.

Yes, EU quotas are allocated to other fleets within the Irish EEZ, and Ireland has long been a transhipment point for fish caught by the Spanish whitefish fleet in particular. Dingle, Co Kerry has seen an increase in foreign landings, as has Castletownbere. The west Cork port recorded foreign landings of 36 million euro or 48 per cent in 2019, and has long been nicknamed the "peseta" port, due to the presence of Spanish-owned transhipment plant, Eiranova, on Dinish island.

Most fish and shellfish caught or cultivated in Irish waters is for the export market, and this was hit hard from the early stages of this year's Covid-19 pandemic. The EU, Asia and Britain are the main export markets, while the middle Eastern market is also developing and the African market has seen a fall in value and volume, according to figures for 2019 issued by BIM.

Fish was once a penitential food, eaten for religious reasons every Friday. BIM has worked hard over several decades to develop its appeal. Ireland is not like Spain – our land is too good to transform us into a nation of fish eaters, but the obvious health benefits are seeing a growth in demand. Seafood retail sales rose by one per cent in 2019 to 300 million euro. Salmon and cod remain the most popular species, while BIM reports an increase in sales of haddock, trout and the pangasius or freshwater catfish which is cultivated primarily in Vietnam and Cambodia and imported by supermarkets here.

The EU's Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983, pooled marine resources – with Ireland having some of the richest grounds and one of the largest sea areas at the time, but only receiving four per cent of allocated catch by a quota system. A system known as the "Hague Preferences" did recognise the need to safeguard the particular needs of regions where local populations are especially dependent on fisheries and related activities. The State's Sea Fisheries Protection Authority, based in Clonakilty, Co Cork, works with the Naval Service on administering the EU CFP. The Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine and Department of Transport regulate licensing and training requirements, while the Marine Survey Office is responsible for the implementation of all national and international legislation in relation to safety of shipping and the prevention of pollution.

Yes, a range of certificates of competency are required for skippers and crew. Training is the remit of BIM, which runs two national fisheries colleges at Greencastle, Co Donegal and Castletownbere, Co Cork. There have been calls for the colleges to be incorporated into the third-level structure of education, with qualifications recognised as such.

Safety is always an issue, in spite of technological improvements, as fishing is a hazardous occupation and climate change is having its impact on the severity of storms at sea. Fishing skippers and crews are required to hold a number of certificates of competency, including safety and navigation, and wearing of personal flotation devices is a legal requirement. Accidents come under the remit of the Marine Casualty Investigation Board, and the Health and Safety Authority. The MCIB does not find fault or blame, but will make recommendations to the Minister for Transport to avoid a recurrence of incidents.

Fish are part of a marine ecosystem and an integral part of the marine food web. Changing climate is having a negative impact on the health of the oceans, and there have been more frequent reports of warmer water species being caught further and further north in Irish waters.

Brexit, Covid 19, EU policies and safety – Britain is a key market for Irish seafood, and 38 per cent of the Irish catch is taken from the waters around its coast. Ireland's top two species – mackerel and prawns - are 60 per cent and 40 per cent, respectively, dependent on British waters. Also, there are serious fears within the Irish industry about the impact of EU vessels, should they be expelled from British waters, opting to focus even more efforts on Ireland's rich marine resource. Covid-19 has forced closure of international seafood markets, with high value fish sold to restaurants taking a large hit. A temporary tie-up support scheme for whitefish vessels introduced for the summer of 2020 was condemned by industry organisations as "designed to fail".

Sources: Bord Iascaigh Mhara, Marine Institute, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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