Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

BIM Brexit ready

Displaying items by tag: diving

#NEWS UPDATE - The Irish Coast Guard told RTÉ News that it has received an "overwhelming" response from the diving community to its appeal to join the search in West Cork for two missing fishermen.

Skipper Michael Hayes and crewman Saied Ali Eldin are still missing after the fishing vessel Tit Bonhomme ran aground in rough seas near Adam's Rock at the mouth of Glandore Harbour.

Only one of the six-person crew - 43-year-old Abdul Mohammed – is confirmed to have survived. The bodies of Kevin Kershaw (21) and Attia Shaban (26) were recovered last week, while the remains of Wael Mohammed (35) were found by civilian divers near the wreck site last Sunday.

Coastguard manager Declan Geoghegan said that search teams now have the 48 divers required to conduct an exhaustive search of the wreck area and urged further volunteers not to travel for the moment.

The search will concentrate on the waters between Adam's Rock and Long Point, where much of the debris from the trawler has washed up.

RTÉ News reports that more than 200 volunteers are assisting the coastal search by boat and on land, which is being co-ordinated from the village of Union Hall.

Published in News Update

#NEWS UPDATE - The search is set to resume again this morning for the three fishermen not yet recovered after their trawler sank off West Cork last Sunday.

Skipper Michael Hayes and Egyptian crewmen Saied Ali Eldin and Wael Mohammed have been missing since the fishing vessel Tit Bonhomme ran aground and went down in rough seas near Adam's Rock, at the mouth of Glandore Harbour.

Only one of the six-person crew, 43-year-old Abdul Mohammed, is confirmed alive after he was able to reach the shore immediately following the incident.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Garda divers retrieved the body of Attia Shaban (26) on Thursday morning, followed in the afternoon by that of Kevin Kershaw (21).

Yesterday the search was expanded to cover an 18-mile radius after a dive at the wreck site was unsuccessful, according to The Irish Times.

Divers from the Garda and Naval Service will continue to focus on the wreck today, helped by favourable weather conditions, while volunteers join in the wider search of the coastline.

It emerged on Friday that that boat's aluminium wheelhouse sheared off in the rough seas that followed for three days after it ran aground.

RTÉ News has video of the search operation in progress HERE.

Published in News Update

#RESCUE - Garda divers have this morning recovered a body in their search for the crew of the fishing vessel Tit Bonhomme off the coast of West Cork.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, five of the six-person crew went missing after the boat ran aground and went down rough seas near Adam's Rock, at the mouth of Glandore Harbour.

The five men include skipper Michael Hayes from Helvic Head in Co Waterford, Dubliner Kevin Kershaw (21) and Egyptians Said Mohammed (23), Wael Mohammed (35) and Attea Ahmed Shaban (26).

RTÉ News reports that the body recovered this morning has not been identified, but it is believed to be that of an Egyptian national.

Dive teams from the Garda and Naval Service have been set back by the trawler's position wedged in a narrow inlet with strong wash and backwash on either side, but were said to have made "significant progress" during dives yesterday.

A broader search is also being conducted inside and outside the harbour area and surrounding coastline, assisted by fishing boats, Irish Coast Guard rescue helicopters, and small boats and kayaks.

Published in Rescue

#NEWS UPDATE - A fisherman whose body was found in a Scottish harbour on St Stephen's Day has been identified as that of a 34-year-old Donegal man, the Belfast Telegraph reports.

Philip Anthony Toland, from Glengad in Inishowen, Co Donegal, was last seen on Christmas Day near the pier at Ullapool harbour in the Scottish Highlands.

As BBC News reports, concerns were raised later that evening and a search was launched involving police, coastguard and RNLI lifeboat teams.

The body was located by a police dive team in the sea near the pier when the search resumed on Monday morning.

It is being speculated that Toland - who has an eight-year-old son - may have slipped and fallen into the water while returning to his boat.

Published in News Update

#DIVING - A Guinness World Record holding SCUBA diver has been appointed as Ireland's first ever Professor of Midwifery, the Galway Advertiser reports.

Prof Declan Devine, who is a leading seararcher and scholar in the field, will take up the role at NUI Galway's School of Nursing and Midwifery.

His expertise in childcare goes in tandem with his efforts to raise funds for the care of children with serious illnesses. He serves as director of West of Ireland children's cancer charity Hand in Hand.

Prof Devine has also combined his charitable activities with his passion for SCUBA diving, raising more than €35,000 in 2009 when he set the Guinness World Record for the longest open saltwater SCUBA dive in cold water.

The Galway Advertiser has more on the story HERE.

Published in Diving
A British rescue team has finally recovered the body of the Polish man who died while cave diving in Co Galway, some six days after he was first reported missing.
As previously reported on Afloat.ie, 34-year-old Artur Kozlowski failed to re-emerge from a cave dive near Gort on 5 September.
His body was located last Tuesday evening in the deepest section of the cave, some 52m below the surface.
But it took till Saturday for a team of cave rescue experts to safety recover the body from the narrow passage nearly 1km into the cavern.
Three British caving experts worked with the Irish Cave Rescue Organisation and gardaí on the dangerous operation.
The Speleological Union of Ireland offered its condolences to Kozlowski and his family, who have travelled to Ireland.
In a statement, it said: “This is an unforgiving sport requiring extreme mental and physical fitness, but it was Artur’s passion.”
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

A British rescue team has finally recovered the body of the Polish man who died while cave diving in Co Galway, some six days after he was first reported missing.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, 34-year-old expert cave diver Artur Kozlowski failed to re-emerge from a dive near Gort on 5 September.

His body was located last Tuesday evening in the deepest section of the cave, some 52m below the surface.

But it took till Saturday for a team of cave rescue experts to safety recover the body from the narrow passage nearly 1km into the cavern.

Three British caving experts worked with the Irish Cave Rescue Organisation and gardaí on the dangerous operation.

The Speleological Union of Ireland offered its condolences to Kozlowski and his family, who have travelled to Ireland.

In a statement, it said: “This is an unforgiving sport requiring extreme mental and physical fitness, but it was Artur’s passion.”

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Diving
The search will resume today for a Polish diver reported missing yesterday near Gort in Co Galway.
The Irish Times reports that the man, believed to be in his 30s, was exploring a cave in the area solo yesterday afternoon, but failed to emerge as expected in the evening.
The Irish Coast Guard said the man is known to be a very experienced spelunker, but that he only had enough oxygen to last six hours.
A search was conducted last night in the by a friend of the man and another experienced diver which turned up nothing.
The flooded cave is estimated to be 52m deep, of the kind suitable for experienced divers only.
Afloat.ie will update with more information as soon as it arises.

The search will resume today for a Polish diver reported missing yesterday near Gort in Co Galway.

The Irish Times reports that the man, believed to be in his 30s, was exploring a cave in the area solo yesterday afternoon, but failed to emerge as expected in the evening.

The Irish Coast Guard said the man is known to be a very experienced spelunker, but that he only had enough oxygen to last six hours.

A search was conducted last night in the by a friend of the man and another experienced diver which turned up nothing. 

The flooded cave is estimated to be 52m deep, of the kind suitable for experienced divers only.

Afloat.ie will update with more information as soon as it arises.

Published in Diving

Earlier in the month Waterford diver Eoin McGarry led the technical dive team on the expedition that was carried out by National Geographic Broadcasters for a two hour documentary special which will be aired in May of next year in time for the anniversary of the sinking of Lusitania. Due to contractual agreements McGarry cannot discuss the details of that expedition but the recovery of artifacts was executed by him and and a specialised dive team, and the details of that he reveals here to Afloat.ie readers.

The recovery of artifacts took place on the 22nd of this month as a continuation of Gregg Bemis's five year license. As recovery of artifacts was not on the Nat Geo agenda, their primary objectives were for a forensic examination of the wreck. Subsequently, it was decided by Gregg Bemis and myself to return to the wreck and recover some significant items from the wreck while his licence was still active. Agreement from the Irish Underwater Archaeological Unit and the National Museum of Ireland was necessary for this recovery to proceed as the surrounding site and wreck of the RMS Lusitania is a designated National Monument, and while carrying out the recovery we were monitored by the Irish Naval Service.

Many hours of research involving global positioning satellite information, multibeam data and side scan sonar images of the site were carried out to determine the exact location from which to recover the objects. This is very important due to the physical size of the wreck site, as if you land in the wrong area of the wreck the dive could or would be wasted. Once determined, the remainder of the proposed expedition had to be put in place, a dive vessel suitable in sized and also had to be able to cater for divers, a specially designed lifting vessel that would be able to recover the heavy phosphor bronze bridge telemotor, the dive team, all necessary paperwork and most importantly... the weather.

Once all were in place, all were put on standby until a suitable weather window opened up, and that was to be the 22nd of Aug. The dive vessel was the "Harpy" owned and skippered by Karl O Donoghue out of Kinsale, the lifting vessel was the "Ron Carraig" owned and skippered by Gavin Tivy and Pat Waide out of Youghal, the dive team was myself Eoin McGarry who led and orgainised the recovery operation, Philip Murphy, Frank McKenna, John Corbett, Barry McGill and Stewart Andrews.

The wreck lies 11 and a half miles off the Old Head of Kinsale in 93meters / 300ft of water , which makes it a challenging dive, there are also the considerations of poor visibility, tangled fishing nets and unexploded depth charges to contend with. A dive with a half hour on the the wreck will result in a total runtime of 2.5hours, that is where the diver has to carry out the mandatory decompression stops or suffer severe decompression illness.

The items recovered were the bridge telemotor, a bridge tell tale indicator, 2 large square window type portholes with detailed filigris and 2 round type portholes. The recovered bridge instruments will be examined to see if they will yield vital information during the final moments of Lusitania as it was sinking. It is expected that some of these items will be donated to Irish museums.

diving_kit

Eoin McGarry gets kitted up for the dive on the Lusitania

diving_porthole

A round type porthole


diving_telemotor

A telemotor


diving_underwater

An underwater shot of the recovered large decorative porthole

 

Published in Diving
Tagged under
Divers at the wreck of the Lusitania have recovered important items from the ill-fated cruise liner, The Irish Times reports.
The haul includes a bronze telemotor (part of the ship's steering mechanism), a telegraph that assisted in navigation, and a number of portholes.
It is hoped that some of these might shed some more light on how the ship was lost off the Cork coast, after she was torpedoed by a German U-boat in 1915.
The items are currently being held by Customs and Excise under the 1993 Salvage and Wreck Act until title can be established.
As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Lusitania owner Gregg Bemis is currently mounting what might be the final major dive expedition to the wreck site.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Divers at the wreck of the Lusitania have recovered important items from the ill-fated cruise liner, The Irish Times reports.

The haul includes a bronze telemotor (part of the ship's steering mechanism), a telegraph that assisted in navigation, and a number of portholes. 

It is hoped that some of these might shed some more light on how the ship was lost off the Cork coast, after she was torpedoed by a German U-boat in 1915.

The items are currently being held by Customs and Excise under the 1993 Salvage and Wreck Act until title can be established.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Lusitania owner Gregg Bemis is currently mounting what might be the final major dive expedition to the wreck site.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastal Notes
The Irish Underwater Council (ICU) says injuries in sports diving are increasing, the Irish Examiner reports.
Some 12 of a total of 61 registered incidents last year caused injury to divers. Other incidents included near-misses between boats, divers going missing, air shortages and rapid ascent.
ICU national diving officer Martin Kiely said the figures did not necessarily show that more incidents were occurring, but rather that more were being reported.
The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

The Irish Underwater Council (ICU) says injuries in sports diving are increasing, the Irish Examiner reports.

Some 12 of a total of 61 registered incidents last year caused injury to divers. Other incidents included near-misses between boats, divers going missing, air shortages and rapid ascent.

ICU national diving officer Martin Kiely said the figures did not necessarily show that more incidents were occurring, but rather that more were being reported. 

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE.

Published in Diving
Page 10 of 12

Ireland's Commercial Fishing 

The Irish Commercial Fishing Industry employs around 11,000 people in fishing, processing and ancillary services such as sales and marketing. The industry is worth about €1.22 billion annually to the Irish economy. Irish fisheries products are exported all over the world as far as Africa, Japan and China.

FAQs

Over 16,000 people are employed directly or indirectly around the coast, working on over 2,000 registered fishing vessels, in over 160 seafood processing businesses and in 278 aquaculture production units, according to the State's sea fisheries development body Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM).

All activities that are concerned with growing, catching, processing or transporting fish are part of the commercial fishing industry, the development of which is overseen by BIM. Recreational fishing, as in angling at sea or inland, is the responsibility of Inland Fisheries Ireland.

The Irish fishing industry is valued at 1.22 billion euro in gross domestic product (GDP), according to 2019 figures issued by BIM. Only 179 of Ireland's 2,000 vessels are over 18 metres in length. Where does Irish commercially caught fish come from? Irish fish and shellfish is caught or cultivated within the 200-mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ), but Irish fishing grounds are part of the common EU "blue" pond. Commercial fishing is regulated under the terms of the EU Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983 and with ten-yearly reviews.

The total value of seafood landed into Irish ports was 424 million euro in 2019, according to BIM. High value landings identified in 2019 were haddock, hake, monkfish and megrim. Irish vessels also land into foreign ports, while non-Irish vessels land into Irish ports, principally Castletownbere, Co Cork, and Killybegs, Co Donegal.

There are a number of different methods for catching fish, with technological advances meaning skippers have detailed real time information at their disposal. Fisheries are classified as inshore, midwater, pelagic or deep water. Inshore targets species close to shore and in depths of up to 200 metres, and may include trawling and gillnetting and long-lining. Trawling is regarded as "active", while "passive" or less environmentally harmful fishing methods include use of gill nets, long lines, traps and pots. Pelagic fisheries focus on species which swim close to the surface and up to depths of 200 metres, including migratory mackerel, and tuna, and methods for catching include pair trawling, purse seining, trolling and longlining. Midwater fisheries target species at depths of around 200 metres, using trawling, longlining and jigging. Deepwater fisheries mainly use trawling for species which are found at depths of over 600 metres.

There are several segments for different catching methods in the registered Irish fleet – the largest segment being polyvalent or multi-purpose vessels using several types of gear which may be active and passive. The polyvalent segment ranges from small inshore vessels engaged in netting and potting to medium and larger vessels targeting whitefish, pelagic (herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting) species and bivalve molluscs. The refrigerated seawater (RSW) pelagic segment is engaged mainly in fishing for herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting only. The beam trawling segment focuses on flatfish such as sole and plaice. The aquaculture segment is exclusively for managing, developing and servicing fish farming areas and can collect spat from wild mussel stocks.

The top 20 species landed by value in 2019 were mackerel (78 million euro); Dublin Bay prawn (59 million euro); horse mackerel (17 million euro); monkfish (17 million euro); brown crab (16 million euro); hake (11 million euro); blue whiting (10 million euro); megrim (10 million euro); haddock (9 million euro); tuna (7 million euro); scallop (6 million euro); whelk (5 million euro); whiting (4 million euro); sprat (3 million euro); herring (3 million euro); lobster (2 million euro); turbot (2 million euro); cod (2 million euro); boarfish (2 million euro).

Ireland has approximately 220 million acres of marine territory, rich in marine biodiversity. A marine biodiversity scheme under Ireland's operational programme, which is co-funded by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and the Government, aims to reduce the impact of fisheries and aquaculture on the marine environment, including avoidance and reduction of unwanted catch.

EU fisheries ministers hold an annual pre-Christmas council in Brussels to decide on total allowable catches and quotas for the following year. This is based on advice from scientific bodies such as the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. In Ireland's case, the State's Marine Institute publishes an annual "stock book" which provides the most up to date stock status and scientific advice on over 60 fish stocks exploited by the Irish fleet. Total allowable catches are supplemented by various technical measures to control effort, such as the size of net mesh for various species.

The west Cork harbour of Castletownbere is Ireland's biggest whitefish port. Killybegs, Co Donegal is the most important port for pelagic (herring, mackerel, blue whiting) landings. Fish are also landed into Dingle, Co Kerry, Rossaveal, Co Galway, Howth, Co Dublin and Dunmore East, Co Waterford, Union Hall, Co Cork, Greencastle, Co Donegal, and Clogherhead, Co Louth. The busiest Northern Irish ports are Portavogie, Ardglass and Kilkeel, Co Down.

Yes, EU quotas are allocated to other fleets within the Irish EEZ, and Ireland has long been a transhipment point for fish caught by the Spanish whitefish fleet in particular. Dingle, Co Kerry has seen an increase in foreign landings, as has Castletownbere. The west Cork port recorded foreign landings of 36 million euro or 48 per cent in 2019, and has long been nicknamed the "peseta" port, due to the presence of Spanish-owned transhipment plant, Eiranova, on Dinish island.

Most fish and shellfish caught or cultivated in Irish waters is for the export market, and this was hit hard from the early stages of this year's Covid-19 pandemic. The EU, Asia and Britain are the main export markets, while the middle Eastern market is also developing and the African market has seen a fall in value and volume, according to figures for 2019 issued by BIM.

Fish was once a penitential food, eaten for religious reasons every Friday. BIM has worked hard over several decades to develop its appeal. Ireland is not like Spain – our land is too good to transform us into a nation of fish eaters, but the obvious health benefits are seeing a growth in demand. Seafood retail sales rose by one per cent in 2019 to 300 million euro. Salmon and cod remain the most popular species, while BIM reports an increase in sales of haddock, trout and the pangasius or freshwater catfish which is cultivated primarily in Vietnam and Cambodia and imported by supermarkets here.

The EU's Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983, pooled marine resources – with Ireland having some of the richest grounds and one of the largest sea areas at the time, but only receiving four per cent of allocated catch by a quota system. A system known as the "Hague Preferences" did recognise the need to safeguard the particular needs of regions where local populations are especially dependent on fisheries and related activities. The State's Sea Fisheries Protection Authority, based in Clonakilty, Co Cork, works with the Naval Service on administering the EU CFP. The Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine and Department of Transport regulate licensing and training requirements, while the Marine Survey Office is responsible for the implementation of all national and international legislation in relation to safety of shipping and the prevention of pollution.

Yes, a range of certificates of competency are required for skippers and crew. Training is the remit of BIM, which runs two national fisheries colleges at Greencastle, Co Donegal and Castletownbere, Co Cork. There have been calls for the colleges to be incorporated into the third-level structure of education, with qualifications recognised as such.

Safety is always an issue, in spite of technological improvements, as fishing is a hazardous occupation and climate change is having its impact on the severity of storms at sea. Fishing skippers and crews are required to hold a number of certificates of competency, including safety and navigation, and wearing of personal flotation devices is a legal requirement. Accidents come under the remit of the Marine Casualty Investigation Board, and the Health and Safety Authority. The MCIB does not find fault or blame, but will make recommendations to the Minister for Transport to avoid a recurrence of incidents.

Fish are part of a marine ecosystem and an integral part of the marine food web. Changing climate is having a negative impact on the health of the oceans, and there have been more frequent reports of warmer water species being caught further and further north in Irish waters.

Brexit, Covid 19, EU policies and safety – Britain is a key market for Irish seafood, and 38 per cent of the Irish catch is taken from the waters around its coast. Ireland's top two species – mackerel and prawns - are 60 per cent and 40 per cent, respectively, dependent on British waters. Also, there are serious fears within the Irish industry about the impact of EU vessels, should they be expelled from British waters, opting to focus even more efforts on Ireland's rich marine resource. Covid-19 has forced closure of international seafood markets, with high value fish sold to restaurants taking a large hit. A temporary tie-up support scheme for whitefish vessels introduced for the summer of 2020 was condemned by industry organisations as "designed to fail".

Sources: Bord Iascaigh Mhara, Marine Institute, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Car Brands

subaru sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton dob
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

quantum sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating