Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

BIM Brexit ready

Displaying items by tag: drowning

The Irish Examiner reports that the families of two fisherman who drowned off Malin Head last November disagree with the findings of the official investigation into the tragedy.
Eddie Doherty, 65, and his nephew Robert McLaughlin, 41, died after their small fishing boat F/V Jennifer capsized and sank off Glengad on 1 November last year.
The official report released last week by the Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB) found that a combination of high winds in the area and unstable weight on the boat due to the crab pots it was carrying most likely caused the vessel to list to an angle from which it could not be recovered.
But Eddie Doherty's widow said she disagreed with this conclusion.
"With Eddie’s experience and his regard for safety the load would have been spread evenly over the deck of the boat and therefore this would not have had an adverse affect on the stability of the boat," said Marian Doherty.
The full MCIB report is available to read HERE.

The Irish Examiner reports that the families of two fisherman who drowned off Malin Head last November disagree with the findings of the official investigation into the tragedy.

Eddie Doherty, 65, and his nephew Robert McLaughlin, 41, died after their small fishing boat F/V Jennifer capsized and sank off Glengad on 1 November last year.

The official report released last week by the Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB) found that a combination of high winds in the area and unstable weight on the boat due to the crab pots it was carrying most likely caused the vessel to list to an angle from which it could not be recovered.

But Eddie Doherty's widow said she disagreed with this conclusion.

"With Eddie’s experience and his regard for safety the load would have been spread evenly over the deck of the boat and therefore this would not have had an adverse affect on the stability of the boat," said Marian Doherty.

The full MCIB report is available to read in full HERE.

Published in MCIB
Dublin Gardaí are still appealing for information on the drowing of a Co Tyrone man in the River Liffey last weekend.
RTÉ News reports that Aiden Mullen, 35, had been socialising in the city after the All-Ireland Football Championship match at Croke Park on Saturday 30 July.
At around 3.20am last Sunday morning, Mullen was waiting with his brother and friends on Burgh Quay for taxis home when he broke away from the group and approached the river wall.
He was last seen falling into the water by his brother, who jumped in to assist him. Both men, as well as three passers-by who entered the water to help, got into difficulty.
Dublin Fire Brigade rescued four from the river, but Mullen's body was discovered shortly after.
Gardaí say a number of witnesses have already come forward, but they would like anyone else with information to contact them at Pearse Street Garda Station.

Dublin Gardaí are still appealing for information on the drowing of a Co Tyrone man in the River Liffey last weekend.

RTÉ News reports that Aiden Mullen, 35, had been socialising in the city after the All-Ireland Football Championship match at Croke Park on Saturday 30 July.

At around 3.20am last Sunday morning, Mullen was waiting with his brother and friends on Burgh Quay for taxis home when he broke away from the group and approached the river wall. 

He was last seen falling into the water by his brother, who jumped in to assist him. Both men, as well as three passers-by who entered the water to help, got into difficulty.

Dublin Fire Brigade rescued four from the river, but Mullen's body was discovered shortly after.

Gardaí say a number of witnesses have already come forward, but they would like anyone else with information to contact them at Pearse Street Garda Station.

Published in News Update
Irish Water Safety has appealed to the public to stay vigilant around water in this warm weather and not to become another drowning statistic. This appeal targets all but more particularly those aged 45-65 who alarmingly accounted for 85% of recorded accidental drownings in 2010.

In Tramore today, Council noted with some degree of satisfaction that the total number of drownings in Ireland in 2010 was 112, the lowest figure since 1952 when 104 people drowned. The highest figure recorded in any one year to date is 229 in 1994.

On average in Ireland there were 150 drownings each year in the decade to 2010, during which Irish Water Safety developed a range of educational and promotional campaigns to raise awareness about water safety which obviously is attaining a desired goal.

Speaking about the reduction in drownings, Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government - Phil Hogan, T.D said: "112 lives lost to drowning in 2010 represents a 23% reduction compared to 2009 when 145 drowned. This reduction is a positive indication that the monies invested by Government, local authorities, corporate partnerships and the work of voluntary members promoting water safety nationwide are paying dividends in the saving of lives and the prevention of avoidable tragedies that devastate families and communities. I urge everyone to respect the dangers and to stay vigilant at all times. To stay aware is to stay alive." Continuing, Minister Hogan congratulated the Council and the members of IWS for their contribution in achieving a reduction in the numbers drowned.

Commenting on the decrease, the Chairman of IWS, Frank Nolan said: "We have ended a decade in which we can report that drownings in Ireland in 2010 were at their lowest for 58 years, reason enough to be confident that the work of Irish Water Safety and our partners in the public and private sector is having the desired outcome - more people enjoying our wonderful aquatic facilities more safely."

"That said, complacency is not an option for anybody as the statistics frighteningly reveal." continued Nolan.  "Although 85% of accidental drownings were male, the adage 'boys will be boys' is alarmingly muted by the tragic fact that the vast majority of accidental drownings were not boys at all but grown men -  48% aged 45-65, compared to 15% aged under 24."

"I appeal to all adults to make themselves more aware of the dangers in, on and around water." he added, "It only takes seconds for tragedy to strike and this can so easily be avoided if people take responsibility for their own safety by learning about the hazards in advance of any trip to our wonderful waterways. One such step is to read Irish Water Safety's guidelines at iws.ie."
Irish Water Safety's statistical analysis is available at www.iws.ie. Excerpts from some of the graphs reveal that*:
In the 1970's, we averaged 91 accidental drownings each year. We ended the 00's averaging 55. Last year the figure dropped to 33.
In the 1980's we averaged 207 drownings each year. We ended the 00's averaging 150. Last year the figure dropped to 112.

In 2010:
48% of accidental drownings were aged 46-65
15% of accidental drownings were aged under 24
27% of all drownings were aged 55-64
67% of all drownings were male
85% of accidental drownings were male
56% of female drownings were suicide
40% of male drownings were suicide

*Note that the figure for drownings in which the cause (accident/suicide/assault) remains undetermined for 2010 is 25. 2010 drownings: 112 (53 accident, 68 suicide, 25 undetermined).

Published in Water Safety
Gardaí have confirmed that a 14-year-old boy drowned in the River Liffey near Clane, Co Kildare on Saturday.
According to The Irish Times, it is believed the accident occurred while the teen was playing in the river with friends. His body was removed to Naas hospital.
Elsewhere, RTÉ News reports that a diver is being treated for the bends after getting into difficulty in the sea near Kilkee, Co Clare on Sunday.
The man was airlifted by the Shannon coast guard to Galway's University Hospital after being retrieved by colleagues.

Gardaí have confirmed that a 14-year-old boy drowned in the River Liffey near Clane, Co Kildare on Saturday.

According to The Irish Times, it is believed the accident occurred while the teen was playing in the river with friends. His body was removed to Naas hospital.

Elsewhere, RTÉ News reports that a diver is being treated for the bends after getting into difficulty in the sea near Kilkee, Co Clare on Sunday.

The man was airlifted by the Shannon coast guard to Galway's University Hospital after being retrieved by colleagues.

Published in Water Safety
An Irishwoman who drowned while scuba diving in the Whitsunday Islands in Australia has been named, the Irish Examiner reports.
Elaine Morrow, 23, from Ballintra in Co Donegal, had been on a three-day beginners diving course in the island chain, off the coast of Queensland, when she was separated from her group on Monday.
It is believed the woman had been in Australia for almost a year on a working holiday visa.
The Department of Foreign Affairs has contacted the family and offered consular assistance.

An Irishwoman who drowned while scuba diving in the Whitsunday Islands in Australia has been named, the Irish Examiner reports.

Elaine Morrow, 23, from Ballintra in Co Donegal, had been on a three-day beginners diving course in the island chain, off the coast of Queensland, when she was separated from her group on Monday.

It is believed the woman had been in Australia for almost a year on a working holiday visa.

The Department of Foreign Affairs has contacted the family and offered consular assistance.

Published in Diving
The coroner for Galway West has urged all boat-users to wear lifejackets and put safety first on the water.
Dr Ciarán McLaughlin spoke at the inquest into the death of experienced sailor Johnny Mac Donncha, who drowned after his Galway hooker was knocked over by a gust of wind, The Irish Times reports.
Mac Donncha, 67, was not wearing a lifejacket at the time of the accident on 5 September 2009. Despite the best efforts of rescuers in a neighbouring boat, he could not be revived.
The investigation into the incident found that if he had been wearing the lifejacket that was on board for him, "it would have increased his chances of survival".
The inquest also found that there was no VHF radio on board either vessel, the presence of which would have attracted helicopter assistance "faster and with greater ease".

The coroner for Galway West has urged all boat-users to wear lifejackets and put safety first on the water.

Dr Ciarán McLaughlin spoke at the inquest into the death of experienced sailor Johnny Mac Donncha, who drowned after his Galway hooker was knocked over by a gust of wind, The Irish Times reports.

Mac Donncha, 67, was not wearing a lifejacket at the time of the accident on 5 September 2009. Despite the best efforts of rescuers in a neighbouring boat, he could not be revived.

The investigation into the incident found that if he had been wearing the lifejacket that was on board for him, "it would have increased his chances of survival".

The inquest also found that there was no VHF radio on board either vessel, the presence of which would have attracted helicopter assistance "faster and with greater ease".

Published in Rescue
The inquest into the drowning of diver Ann Howard has heard how she disappeared only feet from the safety of rocks off Arranmore Island.
The Irish Times reports that Howard, 41, was part of a team of eight divers from Manchester on an excursion at the popular Paradise Cavern dive site on 9 May 2008.
Howard and her 'dive buddy' Lee Harvey became separated from the rest of the group and were unable to locate them due to strong surface currents. When the pair got into difficulties, Harvey managed to scramble onto rocks and attract attention of passing boats. But when he returned to the water, Howard has disappeared.
Following an unsuccessful Coast Guard search, a Garda dive team found Howard's body 22 metres below on the seabed the following morning, close to where she had been last seen. Pathologist Dr Katriona Dillon found that her death was due to drowning.
Howard, from Ashton-under-Lyne, had 10 years' experience as a SCUBA diver, and according to her boyfriend had been familiar with her equipment used since 2002.
The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

The inquest into the drowning of diver Ann Howard has heard how she disappeared only feet from the safety of rocks off Arranmore Island.

The Irish Times reports that Howard, 41, was part of a team of eight divers from Manchester on an excursion at the popular Paradise Cavern dive site on 9 May 2008.

Howard and her 'dive buddy' Lee Harvey became separated from the rest of the group and were unable to locate them due to strong surface currents. When the pair got into difficulties, Harvey managed to scramble onto rocks and attract attention of passing boats. But when he returned to the water, Howard has disappeared.

Following an unsuccessful Coast Guard search, a Garda dive team found Howard's body 22 metres below on the seabed the following morning, close to where she had been last seen. Pathologist Dr Katriona Dillon found that her death was due to drowning.

Howard, from Ashton-under-Lyne, had 10 years' experience as a SCUBA diver, and according to her boyfriend had been familiar with her equipment used since 2002.

The Irish Times has more on the story HERE.

Published in Diving

Irish Water Safety is asking people to keep away from the water's edge during the current violent storm force winds and high seas. Ireland averages 153 drownings every year and every year a number of tragedies occur as a result of people walking too close to the edge of coastal areas, cliffs, rivers and lakes during such stormy conditions.

Irish Water Safety is also asking those who own a small craft to make sure that it is well secured and when doing so, to wear a lifejacket at all times as there have been drownings during such activities in the past.

Motorists need to be particularly vigilant to avoid flooded areas on roads but particularly near rivers, because with poor light and short days it is not possible to determine the depth of floods easily.  Swift water will carry cars and other vehicles away and there have been very tragic drownings in the past as a result of such accidents.

Children are naturally curious about water, therefore parents should caution them that floodwater hides the true depth and that manhole covers may be open and that small streams when swollen are very fast and deeper than normal.

What should I do when I hear a Flood Warning?
·                Listen to the national and local radio for met eireann updates and AA Road watch updates
·                Check on neighbours particularly if they are elderly, infirmed or families with young children
·                Move your vehicles to higher ground
·                Move animal stock to higher ground
·                Check your small craft to ensure they are well secured or moored
·                Make sure you have warm clothes, food, drink, a torch and radio.
·                Block doorways and airbricks with sandbags or plastic bags filled with earth. Floodgate products will work effectively also.
·                Switch off gas and electricity supplies if flooding is imminent.
·                Check the time of High Water in the Newspaper.
·                Check out www.flooding.ie for more detail on General flooding

Personal Safety
·                Avoid flood waters at all times
·                carry a mobile phone at all times in case you need to call for help - call 112 or 999 in emergency
·                Wear suitable protective clothing & a lifejacket in on or around water
·                Do not enter fast flowing water.
·                Never put your feet down if swept away by fast flowing waters
·                Flooding on roads will be deeper at dips and around bridges.
·                Stay away from sea and flood defences.
·                when walking or driving, be aware of manhole covers and gratings that may have been moved due to the heavy flow of water.
·                Take care when using electric appliances in damp or flood conditions.
·                Remember that during the hours of darkness the dangers are multiplied.

After the flood
·                Avoid eating food that has been in contact with flood water.
·                Run water for a few minutes and wash your taps.
·                Check gas and electricity supply.
·                Leave wet electrical equipment alone to dry and have it checked prior to use.
·                Ventilate your property well.
·                Check on elderly neighbours.

Published in Water Safety
The crew of Howth RNLI rescued a woman from drowning off the coast of Portrane this week (Monday).

The Lifeboat crew had been out on exercise when they spotted the 31 year old female struggling above the waves. She had sunk two feet beneath the water when the crew reached her. They managed to catch her clothing and pull her aboard the All Weather Lifeboat (ALB), immediately administering first aid.

The RNLI crew then took the lady safely to Howth harbour, as she was thought to be too distressed to be lifted by the Coastguard helicopter which was also in attendance. An awaiting ambulance brought her to Beaumont Hospital to recover.

Howth RNLI voluntary crewmember Dave Howard says:

"All the crew were relieved that this rescue had a positive ending, the lady would certainly have died had we not already been at sea on exercise. She was very lucky"

Related Safety posts

RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Safety News


Rescue News from RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Coast Guard News from Ireland


Water Safety News from Ireland

Marine Casualty Investigation Board News

Marine Warnings

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Page 6 of 6

Ireland's Commercial Fishing 

The Irish Commercial Fishing Industry employs around 11,000 people in fishing, processing and ancillary services such as sales and marketing. The industry is worth about €1.22 billion annually to the Irish economy. Irish fisheries products are exported all over the world as far as Africa, Japan and China.

FAQs

Over 16,000 people are employed directly or indirectly around the coast, working on over 2,000 registered fishing vessels, in over 160 seafood processing businesses and in 278 aquaculture production units, according to the State's sea fisheries development body Bord Iascaigh Mhara (BIM).

All activities that are concerned with growing, catching, processing or transporting fish are part of the commercial fishing industry, the development of which is overseen by BIM. Recreational fishing, as in angling at sea or inland, is the responsibility of Inland Fisheries Ireland.

The Irish fishing industry is valued at 1.22 billion euro in gross domestic product (GDP), according to 2019 figures issued by BIM. Only 179 of Ireland's 2,000 vessels are over 18 metres in length. Where does Irish commercially caught fish come from? Irish fish and shellfish is caught or cultivated within the 200-mile exclusive economic zone (EEZ), but Irish fishing grounds are part of the common EU "blue" pond. Commercial fishing is regulated under the terms of the EU Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983 and with ten-yearly reviews.

The total value of seafood landed into Irish ports was 424 million euro in 2019, according to BIM. High value landings identified in 2019 were haddock, hake, monkfish and megrim. Irish vessels also land into foreign ports, while non-Irish vessels land into Irish ports, principally Castletownbere, Co Cork, and Killybegs, Co Donegal.

There are a number of different methods for catching fish, with technological advances meaning skippers have detailed real time information at their disposal. Fisheries are classified as inshore, midwater, pelagic or deep water. Inshore targets species close to shore and in depths of up to 200 metres, and may include trawling and gillnetting and long-lining. Trawling is regarded as "active", while "passive" or less environmentally harmful fishing methods include use of gill nets, long lines, traps and pots. Pelagic fisheries focus on species which swim close to the surface and up to depths of 200 metres, including migratory mackerel, and tuna, and methods for catching include pair trawling, purse seining, trolling and longlining. Midwater fisheries target species at depths of around 200 metres, using trawling, longlining and jigging. Deepwater fisheries mainly use trawling for species which are found at depths of over 600 metres.

There are several segments for different catching methods in the registered Irish fleet – the largest segment being polyvalent or multi-purpose vessels using several types of gear which may be active and passive. The polyvalent segment ranges from small inshore vessels engaged in netting and potting to medium and larger vessels targeting whitefish, pelagic (herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting) species and bivalve molluscs. The refrigerated seawater (RSW) pelagic segment is engaged mainly in fishing for herring, mackerel, horse mackerel and blue whiting only. The beam trawling segment focuses on flatfish such as sole and plaice. The aquaculture segment is exclusively for managing, developing and servicing fish farming areas and can collect spat from wild mussel stocks.

The top 20 species landed by value in 2019 were mackerel (78 million euro); Dublin Bay prawn (59 million euro); horse mackerel (17 million euro); monkfish (17 million euro); brown crab (16 million euro); hake (11 million euro); blue whiting (10 million euro); megrim (10 million euro); haddock (9 million euro); tuna (7 million euro); scallop (6 million euro); whelk (5 million euro); whiting (4 million euro); sprat (3 million euro); herring (3 million euro); lobster (2 million euro); turbot (2 million euro); cod (2 million euro); boarfish (2 million euro).

Ireland has approximately 220 million acres of marine territory, rich in marine biodiversity. A marine biodiversity scheme under Ireland's operational programme, which is co-funded by the European Maritime and Fisheries Fund and the Government, aims to reduce the impact of fisheries and aquaculture on the marine environment, including avoidance and reduction of unwanted catch.

EU fisheries ministers hold an annual pre-Christmas council in Brussels to decide on total allowable catches and quotas for the following year. This is based on advice from scientific bodies such as the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea. In Ireland's case, the State's Marine Institute publishes an annual "stock book" which provides the most up to date stock status and scientific advice on over 60 fish stocks exploited by the Irish fleet. Total allowable catches are supplemented by various technical measures to control effort, such as the size of net mesh for various species.

The west Cork harbour of Castletownbere is Ireland's biggest whitefish port. Killybegs, Co Donegal is the most important port for pelagic (herring, mackerel, blue whiting) landings. Fish are also landed into Dingle, Co Kerry, Rossaveal, Co Galway, Howth, Co Dublin and Dunmore East, Co Waterford, Union Hall, Co Cork, Greencastle, Co Donegal, and Clogherhead, Co Louth. The busiest Northern Irish ports are Portavogie, Ardglass and Kilkeel, Co Down.

Yes, EU quotas are allocated to other fleets within the Irish EEZ, and Ireland has long been a transhipment point for fish caught by the Spanish whitefish fleet in particular. Dingle, Co Kerry has seen an increase in foreign landings, as has Castletownbere. The west Cork port recorded foreign landings of 36 million euro or 48 per cent in 2019, and has long been nicknamed the "peseta" port, due to the presence of Spanish-owned transhipment plant, Eiranova, on Dinish island.

Most fish and shellfish caught or cultivated in Irish waters is for the export market, and this was hit hard from the early stages of this year's Covid-19 pandemic. The EU, Asia and Britain are the main export markets, while the middle Eastern market is also developing and the African market has seen a fall in value and volume, according to figures for 2019 issued by BIM.

Fish was once a penitential food, eaten for religious reasons every Friday. BIM has worked hard over several decades to develop its appeal. Ireland is not like Spain – our land is too good to transform us into a nation of fish eaters, but the obvious health benefits are seeing a growth in demand. Seafood retail sales rose by one per cent in 2019 to 300 million euro. Salmon and cod remain the most popular species, while BIM reports an increase in sales of haddock, trout and the pangasius or freshwater catfish which is cultivated primarily in Vietnam and Cambodia and imported by supermarkets here.

The EU's Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), initiated in 1983, pooled marine resources – with Ireland having some of the richest grounds and one of the largest sea areas at the time, but only receiving four per cent of allocated catch by a quota system. A system known as the "Hague Preferences" did recognise the need to safeguard the particular needs of regions where local populations are especially dependent on fisheries and related activities. The State's Sea Fisheries Protection Authority, based in Clonakilty, Co Cork, works with the Naval Service on administering the EU CFP. The Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine and Department of Transport regulate licensing and training requirements, while the Marine Survey Office is responsible for the implementation of all national and international legislation in relation to safety of shipping and the prevention of pollution.

Yes, a range of certificates of competency are required for skippers and crew. Training is the remit of BIM, which runs two national fisheries colleges at Greencastle, Co Donegal and Castletownbere, Co Cork. There have been calls for the colleges to be incorporated into the third-level structure of education, with qualifications recognised as such.

Safety is always an issue, in spite of technological improvements, as fishing is a hazardous occupation and climate change is having its impact on the severity of storms at sea. Fishing skippers and crews are required to hold a number of certificates of competency, including safety and navigation, and wearing of personal flotation devices is a legal requirement. Accidents come under the remit of the Marine Casualty Investigation Board, and the Health and Safety Authority. The MCIB does not find fault or blame, but will make recommendations to the Minister for Transport to avoid a recurrence of incidents.

Fish are part of a marine ecosystem and an integral part of the marine food web. Changing climate is having a negative impact on the health of the oceans, and there have been more frequent reports of warmer water species being caught further and further north in Irish waters.

Brexit, Covid 19, EU policies and safety – Britain is a key market for Irish seafood, and 38 per cent of the Irish catch is taken from the waters around its coast. Ireland's top two species – mackerel and prawns - are 60 per cent and 40 per cent, respectively, dependent on British waters. Also, there are serious fears within the Irish industry about the impact of EU vessels, should they be expelled from British waters, opting to focus even more efforts on Ireland's rich marine resource. Covid-19 has forced closure of international seafood markets, with high value fish sold to restaurants taking a large hit. A temporary tie-up support scheme for whitefish vessels introduced for the summer of 2020 was condemned by industry organisations as "designed to fail".

Sources: Bord Iascaigh Mhara, Marine Institute, Department of Agriculture, Food and Marine, Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Car Brands

subaru sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton dob
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events 2021

vdlr21 sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

quantum sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating