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Displaying items by tag: Port of Galway

The Port of Galway has been approved for eligibility for a dedicated EU fund after a recent vote by MEPs.

As Afloat previously reported, the port was declared eligible for funding under the Connecting Europe Facility after it was added to the Trans-European Transport Network (Ten-T).

The European Parliament has voted to approve the new status, confirming that Galway is eligible for the funding.

Fine Gael MEP Colm Markey welcomed the development and said that the vote meant the Port of Galway could seek support to advance its ambitious redevelopment plans.

The port’s status as an importer of products for wind energy is understood to have helped with the designation.

Published in Galway Harbour
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The Port of Galway says that “Christmas has come early” for it, with confirmation that it has been recognised for European TEN-T status.

The development has been welcomed by the harbourmaster, Capt Brian Sheridan, and Galway West junior minister and Government chief whip Hildegarde Naughton.

As Afloat previously reported, Galway’s leading role as an importer for onshore wind projects had swung the deal and has “ effectively changed European policy”, Sheridan notes this week.

The status will allow the port to apply for funding under the EU’s Connecting Europe facility, which aims to remove bottlenecks and technical barriers to a streamlined transport system onshore and at sea.

The Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) policy addresses the implementation and development of a Europe-wide network of railway lines, roads, inland waterways, maritime shipping routes, ports, airports and railroad terminals.

“We are on our 18th onshore wind project, with 700 megawatts or 0.7 gigawatts of onshore wind turbines and blades having come through Galway,” Sheridan said.

Port of Galway Harbourmaster, Capt Brian SheridanPort of Galway Harbourmaster, Capt Brian Sheridan

“We are the leading Irish port for onshore wind, and we had argued in Brussels since 2013 that measuring port performance indicators for TEN-T by tonnage and passenger numbers should be revised to include ports that helped to meet targets for climate action and the European Green Deal,” he explained.

The agreement in principle to include Galway was signalled a year ago at an EU transport ministerial council, when a regulation relating to TEN-T was revised to allow for climate change policy goals.

“The Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) designation for the Port of Galway signifies its integration into a comprehensive European transportation framework,” the Port of Galway said in a statement.

“ This inclusion is significant as it enhances connectivity and accessibility, promoting efficient transportation links between Galway and other key European ports,” it said.

“ It will lead to improved infrastructure, opening the door to EU funding, streamlined logistics, and increased trade opportunities, fostering economic growth for the region and strengthening its role in the broader European transportation network,”it said.

“Christmas has come early,” it concluded.

“For Ireland, the new regulation will mean that upgrading intercity and regional rail lines on the TEN-T network, developing our main ports, linking key infrastructure such as Dublin Airport to rail, developing multi-modal freight terminals, and better integrating local and national transport infrastructure in the designated urban nodes on the network of Dublin, Cork and now Galway, will all be eligible to apply for funding under the EU’s Connecting Europe facility,” Ms Naughton has said.

Galway West junior minister and Government chief whip Hildegarde NaughtonGalway West junior minister and Government chief whip Hildegarde Naughton

Ms Naughton was junior minister for transport when the EU moved to revise its regulation. She is currently Government chief whip and junior minister for public health.

Published in Galway Harbour
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The Port of Galway is currently seeking applications from marine professionals for the position of Marine Pilot.

Applicants should possess a valid STCW (regulation II/2) Certificate of Competency (Deck) on vessels of 500gt or more and be sailing in the position of mate/master.

The successful candidate must permanently reside within 10km of the Pilot Station at the Port of Galway. Applicants must have a legal entitlement to work in Ireland and a proficiency in speaking, comprehending, reading and writing the English language.

Applications should be accompanied with an up-to-date CV, copies of Certificates of Competency and Discharge Book, valid ENG1 Medical certificate and current employer’s notice period.

Applications should be marked “Pilot application” and sent by email to [email protected] or by post to:

Captain Brian Sheridan
Harbour Master & Superintendent of Pilots,
Port of Galway,
New Docks,
Galway
H91 PD37

To arrange an informal chat about the position, or to request further information, contact Capt Sheridan at the email above.

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is 5pm on Friday 18 August.

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The Port of Galway’s upgrade to the “TEN-T” network has been welcomed by Minister of State for Transport and Galway West TD Hildegarde Naughton.

Galway’s addition to the TEN-T network relates to Europe’s plans for offshore renewable energy as a crucial part of future energy mix.

The agreement was confirmed at a recent Transport ministerial council in Brussels.

The Trans-European Transport Network (TEN-T) policy addresses the implementation and development of a Europe-wide network of railway lines, roads, inland waterways, maritime shipping routes, ports, airports and railroad terminals.

The ultimate objective is to close gaps, remove bottlenecks and technical barriers, as well as to strengthen social, economic and territorial cohesion in the EU.

“For Ireland, the new regulation will mean that upgrading intercity and regional rail lines on the TEN-T network, developing our main ports, linking key infrastructure such as Dublin Airport to rail, developing multi-modal freight terminals, and better integrating local and national transport infrastructure in the designated urban nodes on the network of Dublin, Cork and now Galway, will all be eligible to apply for funding under the EU’s Connecting Europe facility,” Ms Naughton said.

“I am particularly pleased that the Port of Galway has been added to the TEN-T network, given the important role it can play in developing renewable energy projects and its ambitious plans in this regard,” she said.

The European Commission’s proposal to revise the Regulation was published in December 2021 and aimed to align the development of the TEN-T network with EU climate goals.

A key addition to the draft regulation is the recognition of the synergies between transport and energy.

Minister for Transport Eamon Ryan said that this will support the development of Ireland’s main ports, making them critical hubs for off-shore wind particularly and ensuring that they are connected on to key infrastructure and population centres.

“The important role that ports have to play in supporting the roll-out of offshore renewable energy is now recognised in the regulation,” he said. “This means that major Irish ports can become key energy hubs, not just for the operation and maintenance of off-shore wind farms, but as locations where the energy from those farms will come onshore,”he said.

“The regulation also sets out how our ports can be connected through enhanced rail particularly for passengers, freight and energy transportation to other key infrastructure and population centres. We are starting this already, with work beginning on the Shannon-Foynes Rail line for example. But, now with T-Trans, we can push ahead to ensure that all of our major ports are resourced for a new era of smart multi-modal interconnectivity,”Ryan said.

The proposal to revise the TEN-T regulation will align it to the European Green Deal objectives and the climate targets of the EU Climate Law.

Rail lines from Limerick to Ballybrophy and Limerick Junction to Waterford are also included in the revised regulation, and the city of Galway is designated an “urban node”.

Projects on the TEN-T network are eligible to apply for part-funding under the EU’s Connecting Europe facility.

Published in Galway Harbour
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On the west coast, the Port of Galway has been included in a major EU transport funding programme.

The port comprising of the Dún Aengus Dock basin, has been included in the programme following an agreement reached by the EU Transport Council as part of the European TEN-T network.

The inclusion of the Port Galway is a first for the harbour located close to the city's centre.

As Galway Bay FM reports, the TEN-T network supports transport infrastructure projects, including ports, road, rail and inland waterways.

Galway Port's CEO Conor O’ Dowd when speaking to Galway Talks, had said this is a major step forward for the West of Ireland.

The CEO added that he is hopeful that the planned redevelopment of the Port will get the green light next year.

To listen more from the CEO, click the link to the radio station for a podcast..

Published in Galway Harbour

Taoiseach Micheál Martin has endorsed plans for Galway to become the State's first "hydrogen hub".

The plan was outlined when Mr Martin gave the keynote speech at a conference hosted by the Port of Galway.

A "hydrogen hub" is a city or region dedicated to developing hydrogen as an alternative energy source, with offshore wind being a key factor.

Hydrogen can be produced when renewable electricity is used to split water into its component parts of hydrogen and oxygen through electrolysis.

Taoiseach Micheal Martin with Maurice O'Gorman, Chair, Galway Harbour Company and Conor O'Dowd, CEO, Galway Harbour Company at “The Renewable Energy Opportunity for the West of Ireland” conference  hosted today by Galway Harbour Company, in the gHotel, Galway.Taoiseach Micheal Martin with Maurice O'Gorman, Chair, Galway Harbour Company and Conor O'Dowd, CEO, Galway Harbour Company Photo:  Eamon Ward

The Galway Hydrogen Hub - dubbed GH2 - will involve combining the resources and expertise of seven groups, including the Port of Galway and NUI Galway.

Renewable Energy entrepreneur Eddie O'Connor was a guest speaker in GalwayRenewable Energy entrepreneur Eddie O'Connor was a guest speaker in Galway

Also involved are CIÉ/Bus Éireann, Aran Island Ferries, the Lasta Mara Teo transport company, Aer Arann Islands and SSE Renewables.

Taoiseach Micheal Martin with Maurice O'Gorman, Chair, Galway Harbour Company and Conor O'Dowd, CEO, Galway Harbour Company at “The Renewable Energy Opportunity for the West of Ireland” conference  hosted today by Galway Harbour Company, in the gHotel, Galway. Photograph by Eamon WardThe conference audience in Galway

Published in Galway Harbour
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Taoiseach Micheál Martin is to address a renewable energy conference hosted by the Port of Galway next week.

Mr Martin will give the keynote speech at the event, entitled “The renewable energy opportunity for the west of Ireland”.

The event will take place both in person at and online from Galway’s G Hotel from 11 am to 3 pm on April 14th.

The Port of Galway says the conference will also include panel discussions on the opportunity renewable energy can play in the economic development of the west of Ireland and the national economy.

Two months ago, the Government approved a €25m investment in a deep water berth facility at Ros an Mhíl harbour, west of Galway in Connemara.

Minister for Marine Charlie McConalogue said the development would allow larger fishing vessels to berth at Ros-a-Mhíl, and would enable the servicing of an offshore wind energy industry.

The full agenda and list of speakers for the Port of Galway’s conference will be available later this week. Registration is now open here

Published in Galway Harbour
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As planned, the second leg of the 23rd Mini Transat EuroChef kicked off Friday and Ireland's only entry in the solo sailing race is lying 12th in the Proto division.

As reported earlier, Galway Franco-Irish sailmaker Yannick Lemonnier, racing Port of Galway, took 16th place in the Proto Class in the first leg and in the early days of the crossing - and with the Atlantic Ocean ahead of him - he is hoping to improve on that.

Propelled along by a light NE'ly breeze, the 86 participants still competing in the event left Santa Cruz de La Palma bound for Saint-Francois with a hefty 2,700-mile sprint ahead of them as well as a great many unknowns.

Unknowns associated with the exercise itself which, for the vast majority of sailors, will be their transatlantic debut, but also unknowns linked to the weather. Indeed, in addition to the wind shadows created by the Canary Islands, the solo sailors will also have to deal with some lacklustre trade wind and the great many uncertainties caused by this scenario.

Good wishes for Galway Minitransat sailor Yannick LemonnierGood wishes for Galway Minitransat sailor Yannick Lemonnier

As predicted, very light airs (between 4 and 5 knots of NE'ly breeze) set the tone for the start of the second leg of the 23rd edition of the Mini Transat EuroChef this Friday afternoon, offshore of Santa Cruz de La Palma. For the next 24-36 hours then, the solo sailors will have to be patient and opportunistic in their bid to escape the Canaries archipelago.

* This Sunday, whilst making headway offshore of the coast fringing the Western Sahara, the fleet competing in the 23rd Mini Transat EuroChef has scattered every which way. Indeed, it now spans over 180 miles in latitude and 130 miles in longitude, evidence that the 84 competitors still out on the racetrack are each sailing their own race. Some of them have clearly placed the emphasis on heading due south where they can rack up good speeds, whilst others are opting for a compromise by zigzagging their way down the Atlantic so as to gradually reposition themselves over to the west. One other, Australian Christiaan Durrant (1015 - Little Rippa), has clearly targeted the shortest route by sticking as closely as possible to the great circle route, which should logically give him pride of place on the leader board in the near future. A position report which, at this stage of the race, doesn't really give a true indication of which competitors are best placed to hook onto favourable conditions going forward.

Published in Solo Sailing

Marine Ireland Industry Network (MIIN) is next week (Thursday, 6th May) to hold an online event 'MIIN in Galway - A Microcosm for Marine Innovation and Industry Opportunities'.

The event (11am-12.30pm) is to focus on innovative marine industrial activities taking place in the Galway region.

MIIN will include opportunities in the marine sector, relevant R&D projects and feature snapshots of four companies actively involved in the industry.

The online event is being facilitated by the team at the newly built GMIT iHub in Galway.

For further information on Speakers and how to register click here.

Noting the Event's running order starts at 11.00am and conclude at 12.30 with afterwards a Q&A session.

Published in Ports & Shipping

The Port of Galway has secured consent to provide compensatory habitat in return for its proposed harbour extension.

An Bord Pleanala has confirmed that the development qualifies to be considered under a derogation of the EU Habitats Directive, which allows projects to be built for "Imperative Reasons of Overriding Public Interest". (IROPI).

The port, which is restricted by tide, applied in 2014 for a €126m expansion.

This would involve the reclamation of 24 hectares from the sea bed and extensive development of deepwater berth space.

Bord Pleanála said that certain elements of the proposed development would have a significant adverse impact on Galway bay, with permanent loss of reef, mud and sand habitats in a candidate special area of conservation.

In its submission, the port has offered compensatory habitat which it would restore.

An Bord Pleanála says it approved the IROPI case for several reasons:

It says it “concluded that the proposal presents an integrated development that enhances the social, economic and recreational benefits of the port for the wider benefit of the population of Galway and its regional hinterland”.

“The enhancement of port facilities also aligns with the European transportation policy promoting ‘short-sea shipping’ as a cost-effective and environmentally sustainable alternative to road transport,” it says.

“The enhancement of the port serving the region will therefore align with European, national and regional policies in favour of balanced spatial and economic development,” it says.

“The port and the tradition of maritime trade is fundamental not just to the economy of Galway but also to its culture and identity,” it says.

“The social and economic benefits of the project include positive impacts to tourism, marine research and development, including offshore renewable energy, urban regeneration and marine leisure opportunities,” it says.

Port of Galway chief executive officer Conor O’Dowd welcomed the confirmation as a “positive further step in the planning process”.

An Bord Pleanála says it has asked the Minister of Housing, Local Government and Heritage to “consider the adequacy of the compensatory measures proposed by the applicant”.

It has also asked the minister to “advise as to whether there are imperative reasons of overriding public interest to enable consideration of the proposed development to proceed”.

Published in Galway Harbour
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Galway Port & Harbour

Galway Bay is a large bay on the west coast of Ireland, between County Galway in the province of Connacht to the north and the Burren in County Clare in the province of Munster to the south. Galway city and port is located on the northeast side of the bay. The bay is about 50 kilometres (31 miles) long and from 10 kilometres (6.2 miles) to 30 kilometres (19 miles) in breadth.

The Aran Islands are to the west across the entrance and there are numerous small islands within the bay.

Galway Port FAQs

Galway was founded in the 13th century by the de Burgo family, and became an important seaport with sailing ships bearing wine imports and exports of fish, hides and wool.

Not as old as previously thought. Galway bay was once a series of lagoons, known as Loch Lurgan, plied by people in log canoes. Ancient tree stumps exposed by storms in 2010 have been dated back about 7,500 years.

It is about 660,000 tonnes as it is a tidal port.

Capt Brian Sheridan, who succeeded his late father, Capt Frank Sheridan

The dock gates open approximately two hours before high water and close at high water subject to ship movements on each tide.

The typical ship sizes are in the region of 4,000 to 6,000 tonnes

Turbines for about 14 wind projects have been imported in recent years, but the tonnage of these cargoes is light. A European industry report calculates that each turbine generates €10 million in locally generated revenue during construction and logistics/transport.

Yes, Iceland has selected Galway as European landing location for international telecommunications cables. Farice, a company wholly owned by the Icelandic Government, currently owns and operates two submarine cables linking Iceland to Northern Europe.

It is "very much a live project", Harbourmaster Capt Sheridan says, and the Port of Galway board is "awaiting the outcome of a Bord Pleanála determination", he says.

90% of the scrap steel is exported to Spain with the balance being shipped to Portugal. Since the pandemic, scrap steel is shipped to the Liverpool where it is either transhipped to larger ships bound for China.

It might look like silage, but in fact, its bales domestic and municipal waste, exported to Denmark where the waste is incinerated, and the heat is used in district heating of homes and schools. It is called RDF or Refuse Derived Fuel and has been exported out of Galway since 2013.

The new ferry is arriving at Galway Bay onboard the cargo ship SVENJA. The vessel is currently on passage to Belem, Brazil before making her way across the Atlantic to Galway.

Two Volvo round world races have selected Galway for the prestigious yacht race route. Some 10,000 people welcomed the boats in during its first stopover in 2009, when a festival was marked by stunning weather. It was also selected for the race finish in 2012. The Volvo has changed its name and is now known as the "Ocean Race". Capt Sheridan says that once port expansion and the re-urbanisation of the docklands is complete, the port will welcome the "ocean race, Clipper race, Tall Ships race, Small Ships Regatta and maybe the America's Cup right into the city centre...".

The pandemic was the reason why Seafest did not go ahead in Cork in 2020. Galway will welcome Seafest back after it calls to Waterford and Limerick, thus having been to all the Port cities.

© Afloat 2020