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Displaying items by tag: Shannon Erne Waterway

Waterways Ireland advises masters of vessels that the winter mooring period will end this Easter Sunday, 31 March, on the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway.

Shannon Navigation Bye-law No. 17(3) will apply from 31 March, such that vessels should not berth in the same harbour for longer than the statutory period of five consecutive days nor more than a total of seven days in any one month.

Services were reconnected to Waterways Ireland harbours and jetties from Friday 15 March, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters of all craft on the Shannon-Erne Waterway that repair works will be taking place at Roscarban Bridge in Co Leitrim from Wednesday 14 February until mid-March.

During these works, a mechanical platform will be hung from the side of the bridge by mechanical plant, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

The navigable channel will remain open, but boaters are asked to comply with safety signage and heed all instructions from safety personnel who will be in the area.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels that all 16 locks on the Shannon-Erne Waterway will be out of service from Friday 22 December to Monday 1 January inclusive.

No lock passage by boat will be possible during this period before normal service resumes at 9am on Tuesday 2 January, says the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, the service block at Ballyconnell is currently closed due for extensive refurbishing works.

The service blocks at Aghalane and Haughton’s Shore, Ballinamore, Keshcarrigan and Leitrim village remain open, as do all land-based and water-based blueway trails associated with the waterway.

Waterways Ireland says it regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation in this matter.

Further information may be had during normal business hours by contacting Waterways Ireland’s Carrick-on-Shannon office at 071 9650 562.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland is planning to commence extensive refurbishment works to Ballyconnell service block on the Shannon-Erne Waterway on Monday 27 November, with works scheduled to last approximately four months.

During this time the service block will be closed to the public, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways.

Alternative service block facilities managed by Waterways Ireland can be found along the Shannon-Erne Waterway at Haughton’s Shore in Co Leitrim and Aghalane, Co Fermanagh.

For further details on the closure, contact the Waterways Ireland Regional Offices on 0719650787 or email [email protected].

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters that the winter mooring period for public harbours on the Shannon Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway will commence on Wednesday 1 November and will end on 31 March next year.

Masters wishing to avail of winter mooring are required to pay the winter mooring fee of €63.50 prior to 1 November. Online registration must be made on the Waterways Ireland website.

The steps in the winter mooring process are as follows:

  1. Apply online for winter mooring at a specific harbour.
  2. Receive email approval/rejection/alternative location of application.
  3. Follow link on approval email when received to pay winter mooring fee online.

Masters are reminded that Bye-Law 17, the ‘five consecutive days/seven days in one month’ rule, continues to apply for masters not availing of winter mooring.

Waterways Ireland will be disconnecting its electricity supply points and water supply at public moorings for the winter period (November–March). Both services will be reinstated prior to the commencement of the 2024 boating season.

Owners should note that vessels are moored in public harbours at the owners risk at all times and may be directed to other harbours as operational exigencies require.

In other news, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways advises that two green conical aids to navigation — No 1248 upstream of Parteen Weir and No 500 upstream of Lanesboro Bridge — are currently off station. Mariners are requested to exercise care when navigating in these area.

Meanwhile, in Dromod Harbour in Co Leitrim the pump-out station is now fully operational.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises masters and owners of vessels that Locks 9 to 14 on the Shannon-Erne Waterway will be out of service on Thursday 5 October from 9.30am to 4pm due to a planned ESB power outage.

No lock passage by boat will be possible during this period, but it is expected that normal service will resume at 4pm, the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways adds.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland is concluding its jetty upgrade works in Leitrim village, and advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon-Erne Waterway of the following:

  • The public jetty fronting the Marina Apartments in Leitrim village will reopen for mooring this Friday 29 September.
  • The public jetty and car park at the service block in Leitrim village will be closed on Thursday 28 September to facilitate demobilisation of floating plant and equipment.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation in this matter.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland is commencing upgrading works to a jetty in Leitrim village, and advises masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon-Erne Waterway that this will result in the following temporary closures:

  • The public jetty fronting the Marina Apartments in Leitrim village will be closed for mooring from Thursday 14 to Friday 29 September.
  • The public jetty at the service block in Leitrim village is closed for mooring from Wednesday 13 to Friday 15 September.
  • The car park in Leitrim village will be closed on Thursday 14 and Friday 15 September to accommodate mobilisation of floating plant and equipment.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it regrets any inconvenience that this may cause and thanks its customers for their cooperation in this matter.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels and water users on the Shannon-Erne Waterway that Inland Fisheries Ireland will be conducting a fish stock survey on Lough Garadice in Co Leitrim next week between Monday 4 and Thursday 7 September.

All nets will be clearly marked by orange buoys marked “IFI Survey”, adds the cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways.

Masters of vessels and all water users should proceed with additional caution when operating on Lough Garadice during this period.

Published in Inland Waterways

Waterways Ireland advises all masters of vessels on and users of the Shannon-Erne Waterway that tree trimming and hedge cutting will be carried out at various locations during the autumn/winter period from September 2023 to February 2024.

During this operation, floating pontoons will be located on the water with mechanical plant operating. Mechanical plant will also be in operation along the banks of the waterway.

Masters will be advised by Waterways Ireland staff when making a passage and the co-operation of masters is requested at this time.

The cross-border body for Ireland’s inland waterways says it regrets any inconvenience caused to its customers.

Published in Inland Waterways
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Galway Port & Harbour

Galway Bay is a large bay on the west coast of Ireland, between County Galway in the province of Connacht to the north and the Burren in County Clare in the province of Munster to the south. Galway city and port is located on the northeast side of the bay. The bay is about 50 kilometres (31 miles) long and from 10 kilometres (6.2 miles) to 30 kilometres (19 miles) in breadth.

The Aran Islands are to the west across the entrance and there are numerous small islands within the bay.

Galway Port FAQs

Galway was founded in the 13th century by the de Burgo family, and became an important seaport with sailing ships bearing wine imports and exports of fish, hides and wool.

Not as old as previously thought. Galway bay was once a series of lagoons, known as Loch Lurgan, plied by people in log canoes. Ancient tree stumps exposed by storms in 2010 have been dated back about 7,500 years.

It is about 660,000 tonnes as it is a tidal port.

Capt Brian Sheridan, who succeeded his late father, Capt Frank Sheridan

The dock gates open approximately two hours before high water and close at high water subject to ship movements on each tide.

The typical ship sizes are in the region of 4,000 to 6,000 tonnes

Turbines for about 14 wind projects have been imported in recent years, but the tonnage of these cargoes is light. A European industry report calculates that each turbine generates €10 million in locally generated revenue during construction and logistics/transport.

Yes, Iceland has selected Galway as European landing location for international telecommunications cables. Farice, a company wholly owned by the Icelandic Government, currently owns and operates two submarine cables linking Iceland to Northern Europe.

It is "very much a live project", Harbourmaster Capt Sheridan says, and the Port of Galway board is "awaiting the outcome of a Bord Pleanála determination", he says.

90% of the scrap steel is exported to Spain with the balance being shipped to Portugal. Since the pandemic, scrap steel is shipped to the Liverpool where it is either transhipped to larger ships bound for China.

It might look like silage, but in fact, its bales domestic and municipal waste, exported to Denmark where the waste is incinerated, and the heat is used in district heating of homes and schools. It is called RDF or Refuse Derived Fuel and has been exported out of Galway since 2013.

The new ferry is arriving at Galway Bay onboard the cargo ship SVENJA. The vessel is currently on passage to Belem, Brazil before making her way across the Atlantic to Galway.

Two Volvo round world races have selected Galway for the prestigious yacht race route. Some 10,000 people welcomed the boats in during its first stopover in 2009, when a festival was marked by stunning weather. It was also selected for the race finish in 2012. The Volvo has changed its name and is now known as the "Ocean Race". Capt Sheridan says that once port expansion and the re-urbanisation of the docklands is complete, the port will welcome the "ocean race, Clipper race, Tall Ships race, Small Ships Regatta and maybe the America's Cup right into the city centre...".

The pandemic was the reason why Seafest did not go ahead in Cork in 2020. Galway will welcome Seafest back after it calls to Waterford and Limerick, thus having been to all the Port cities.

© Afloat 2020