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Displaying items by tag: Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard (IRCG), a Division of the Department of Transport, and has responsibility for critical incidents response to maritime emergencies and the Director of IRCG has a key role in ensuring effective and efficient service delivery on behalf of the citizen.

The IRCG provides search and rescue services across the state and saves on average 400 lives per year. It is comprised of almost 100 full time staff and supported by almost 1,000 volunteers across 44 units nationwide. Its scope includes rescue from the sea, cliffs and mountains, the provision of maritime safety broadcasts, ship casualty operations and investigation of pollution reports.

The Director of the IRCG will be a key member of the senior management team in the Department of Transport and will report to the Assistant Secretary with the responsibility for the IRCG. Amongst their responsibilities, the Director of the IRCG will have operational responsibility for search and rescue and accident prevention services around the Irish coast and on Irish inland waterways. They will also oversee the operational activities of the IRCG nationwide including the Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centres and coastal sector units.

The successful candidate will have:

  • Significant experience, at an appropriate level, in Maritime Search and Rescue operations management, ship casualty, and pollution response.
  • Substantial senior level management experience in managing resources in complex organisations of scale.
  • Experience of policy development, delivery and implementation in a complex organisation.
  • A track record of successfully leading change or innovation within a complex organisation(s).

For More information and how to apply, visit: https://bit.ly/AO_Ad_DirectorICG

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is 3pm on Thursday 23 rd February 2023.

We are committed to a policy of equal opportunity and encourage applications under all nine grounds of the Employment Equality Act.

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The Irish Coast Guard (IRCG) is 201 years old and we are now looking for an exceptional individual committed to ensuring that the search and rescue services provided across the State continue to be the best that they can be for the years ahead.

The Coast Guard saves on average 400 lives per year, responding to almost 3,000 call outs. The services are co-ordinated by almost 100 full time staff and almost 1,000 dedicated volunteers nationwide. This is an exciting opportunity for the right individual to harness the energy and commitment of volunteers and permanent staff, delivering this key emergency service, to the highest governance, operational and ethical standards.

The Assistant Secretary will be responsible for setting the strategic direction on what will save the most lives, including improving safety on the water for all citizens and delivering excellent customer service, working effectively with a wide range of stakeholders. They will also have responsibility for driving and delivering a transformation programme of the IRCG, following a review across all aspects of the Coast Guard Service including culture, governance, strategy, structure and roles to ensure that the IRCG is best placed to succeed in the 21st century. A key aspect of this role will be initiating an independent review of the role of the volunteer. The review will be informed by an extensive engagement programme with volunteers and staff to inform and guide this work.

The Department of Transport now seeks to appoint an Assistant Secretary, the first time an appointment has been made at this senior leadership level to lead the Irish Coast Guard.
The successful candidate will:

  • have a proven record of achievement at a senior level that demonstrates the necessary vision, governance, leadership and management skills required;
  • have the leadership ability to manage a diverse workforce, including uniformed coast guard officers, volunteer units, operational room staff, policy officials and administrative support staff;
  • have experience of driving reform in a complex organisation of scale and have a proven ability to deliver change initiatives, including people management and performance improvement
  • have expertise in driving and maintaining the highest standards of financial management and governance compliance
  • have proven ability in analysis and decision-making in resolving complex problems
  • have proven skills in effectively developing and maintaining key relationships.

This is a Top Level Appointments Committee (TLAC) position.

If you feel you would benefit from a confidential discussion about this role, contact Aoife Lyons on [email protected]

For More information and how to apply, visit: https://bit.ly/AO_Ad_ASecretaryICG

The closing date for receipt of completed applications is 15:00 on Thursday 23 February, 2023.

We are committed to a policy of equal opportunity and encourage applications under all nine grounds of the Employment Equality Act.

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Howth’s Irish Coast Guard unit reminds sea swimmers to be wary of cold water temperatures after they responded to a hypothermic swimmer needing medical assistance on Wednesday morning (4 January).

The casualty was taken safely from the water at Balscadden Bay and transferred to the care of the National Ambulance Service. Howth Community First Responders and the Dublin Fire Brigade also attended the scene.

Commenting on social media, Howth’s coastguard said: “While Balscadden is sheltered, water temperatures are a very cold 8C at the moment.”

They added: “If you see someone in difficulty and think they need assistance on or near the coast, dial 999/112 and ask to speak to the Irish Coast Guard.”

Published in Sea Swim
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Kinsale RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crew along with the assistance of four coastguard units rescued two stranded dogs on Bank Holiday Monday (2 January).

The dogs had gotten into difficulty at the bottom of a cliff near Nohoval Cove in West Cork and were last seen by their owners the previous day.

Kinsale RNLI’s lifeboat Miss Sally Ann Baggy II, helmed by Jonathan Connor, was launched just before 10am and reached the bottom of the cliff near New Foundland Bay shortly after in difficult sea conditions.

Irish Coast Guard units from Oysterhaven, Kinsale, Summercove and Crosshaven were also tasked.

Due to a southwesterly surge, it proved challenging to veer the lifeboat in, so a decision was made to hold position and send two crew members into the water and swim to the base of the cliff.

With the help of the coastguard units and a specialist tracking device that was on the dogs’ collars, the two dogs were rescued uninjured and reunited with their owners shortly after midday at Oysterhaven Coast Guard station.

Speaking following the callout, Kinsale RNLI helm Jonathan Connor said: “This was a multi-agency response from our volunteers and our colleagues in the coastguard. Unfortunately, one of the three dogs involved died but we were glad to be able to reunite the two others with their owners.

“We would remind dog owners to ensure to look after their own personal safety and don’t get into danger trying to attempt a rescue themselves. We would advise keeping dogs on a lead if close to cliff edges.

“If your dog does go over a cliff and into the water or gets stuck in mud, don't go in after them. Instead move to a place your dog can get to safely and call their name and they may get out by themselves.

“If you're worried about your dog, call 999 or 112 and ask for the coastguard.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

It was a swift start to the New Year this afternoon (Sunday 1 January) for the team at Howth’s Irish Coast Guard unit as they were tasked to a kitesurfer who was blown offshore after the wind dropped near Dollymount Strand.

Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s inshore lifeboat was also called to the scene from across Dublin Bay and brought the kitesurfer ashore to the Howth coastguard team, who assessed the casualty and found they needed no further assistance.

Howth Coast Guard Unit said: “The kitesurfer was well prepared. They had a shore contact who was keeping an eye on them (who ultimately called the coastguard); a heavyweight winter weight wet suit [and] a buoyancy aid.

“Remember if you see someone in difficulty on or near the coast, dial 112/999 and ask for Irish Coast Guard.”

Published in Rescue

A Wexford senator has called for new premises for Courtown’s coastguard unit to be made a priority by the Office of Public Works.

As the Gorey Guardian reports, Senator Malcolm Byrne told the Seanad that progress on procuring suitable premises was at a “glacial pace”.

Currently, the Courtown unit of the Irish Coast Guard occupies a single room hut with no toilet which is used by 22 crew members.

"I am concerned about it because the council had identified potential sites and it was not going to leave them sitting around,” the senator said.

“Potential private sites were also identified. The money has been provided for the purchase of a site. The Coast Guard is very keen that the acquisition would progress. The minister is aware of the vital work the coastguard does in coastal communities.

“I am disappointed because the situation has not moved on to any great extent since I raised it as a commencement matter in February and by other means.”

The Gorey Guardian has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard

The Irish Coast Guard has vacancies for Watch Officers at its three Marine Rescue Coordination Centres in Dublin, Malin Head in Co Donegal and Valentia in Co Kerry.

Watch Officers are responsible for watch-keeping on the emergency communications systems, act as Search and Rescue Mission Coordinators, Marine Alert and Notification Officers, and are responsible for tasking and coordination of coastguard aviation operations.

They process marine communication traffic, monitor vessel traffic separation and coordinate responses to maritime casualty and pollution incidents as well as coast guard support for the other emergency services.

Applications should be made online through PublicJobs.ie. An information booklet for candidates is available, and the closing date for applications is 3pm on Thursday 24 November.

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The Irish Coast Guard has shared video of a drone-assisted rescue in Cork Harbour which it says illustrates the increasing importance of new technology in emergency responses.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, Crosshaven RNLI rescued a woman who was cut off by the tide at White Bay on Tuesday evening (11 October).

The lifeboat crew were able to quickly reach the casualty as they were guided by the drone launched by Guillen Coast Guard Unit, the IRCG says.

Lights on the drone were also used to illuminate the area as the volunteers recovered the casualty, Guillen Coast Guard adds.

The IRCG says this was one of two rescues in recent days — the other in Clogherhead, Co Louth — where unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) “successfully and quickly located casualties in dangerous and inaccessible locations requiring extraction by either boat or helicopter”.

Published in Coastguard

A dog has escaped serious injury as he was rescued from the sea after falling more than 70 feet from a cliff near Doolin in Co Clare.

As TheJournal.ie reports, Irish Coast Guard volunteers responded to the call for help from the dog’s distressed owners at Trá Lathan on Wednesday afternoon (14 September).

Doolin Coast Guard’s Emmet McNamara explained to RTÉ’s Morning Ireland on Thursday morning (15 September) how the team launched their smaller D class rescue boat in order to safety retrieve the “terrified and frightened” dog, named Bear.

The canine casualty was found sitting on a rock and attempting to climb back up the cliff to no avail — before the coastguard stepped in, using their boat hook to snag the dog’s collar and lift him aboard.

Bear was then swiftly reunited with his relieved humans, the Collins family from Athenry in Co Galway.

The Collins family with Bear the dog and members of Doolin Coast Guard involved in his rescue on Wednesday | Credit: Irish Coast Guard/FacebookThe Collins family with Bear the dog and members of Doolin Coast Guard involved in his rescue on Wednesday | Credit: Irish Coast Guard/Facebook

Published in Coastguard
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Minister for Transport Eamon Ryan and Minister of State Hildegarde Naughton, will hold a commemorative event in Greenore, Co Louth next Thursday (8 September) to mark the 200th anniversary of the Irish Coast Guard.

“The event is an opportunity to thank all full-time staff and volunteers, past and present, for their dedication and commitment to the Irish Coast Guard over the past 200 years,” the Deparment of Transport says.
 
The service was enacted in 1822 when Ireland was still a part of the United Kingdom and following independence in 1922 was reconstituted as the Coast Life Saving Service, which later became the Coast and Cliff Rescue Service, then Slánú - the Irish Marine Emergency Service and, in early 2000, the Irish Coast Guard.

Next Thursday’s event, from 10am at Greenore Coast Guard Unit, will include presentations of plaques to both the volunteer and full-time staff and a number of long service medal presentations, as well as a fly-past by a coastguard helicopter.

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