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Displaying items by tag: EV Nautilus

The Co. Wicklow based Maritime Management has been awarded the ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 accreditation by the international accreditation body Germanischer Lloyd. The award to Maritime Management marks the company as a unique provider of ship management services based
in Ireland.
"These awards show our dedication to delivering high quality ship management services, beyond the strict compliance required in this highly regulated industry," said Jan Berg, managing director of Maritime Management.

"Achieving ISO 14001 accreditation, an internationally recognised green standard, shows our respect of the sensitive marine environment and has been well received by our international and Irish clients. It is of particular significance to our clients involved in underwater exploration and scientific research and those involved in the transport of agricultural produce either refrigerated or in bulk."

Maritime Management has an international client base with a diverse range of vessels. Services include technical, operational and crewing for specialist passenger ships, cargoships, refrigerated cargo ships and specialist vessels such as the exploration vessel EV Nautilus.

The vessel is managed on behalf of the famous undersea explorer Dr. Robert Ballard, who is known best for his discovery of the Titanic, PT 109 and the Bismark. Over the last two years Maritime Management has carried out major work to adapt the vessel to suit the requirements of broadcasters National Geographic and CBS.

The work carried outon the vessel has the ground breaking ability to broadcast live HD video from the ocean floor. This enabled scientific teams from the USA and around the world to interact in real time with the underwater operations. To read more about the work of the EV Nautilus and the mapping of underwater volcanoes, life forms,shipwrecks and more click here.

Maritime Management's projects in Ireland have included the design and construction of the Geological Survey of Ireland (GSI) RV Keary, a small yet high-tech survey vessel which was built in South Africa. The 15m asymmetrical catamaran is constructed of aluminium and has a speed of 15 knots. The craft has a Marine Survey Office P5 license for 12 passengers. For further technical details click here.

Published in Ports & Shipping

As an island economy, a healthy maritime sector is key to our national competitiveness. Virtually all our imports and exports pass through Irish ports.

Ireland is dependent on ports and shipping services to transport goods and 90% of our trade is moved though Irish ports. Shipping and maritime transport services make a significant contribution to Ireland’s ocean economy, with the sector generating €2.3 billion in turnover and employing over 5,000 people in 2018.

Ireland’s maritime industry continues to grow and progress each year with Irish ports and shipping companies making significant investments. The ports sector in Ireland is currently undergoing a number of expansions and developments with Dublin Port’s Alexandra Basin development, the development of Ringaskiddy in Cork by Port of Cork and the development of Shannon Foynes Port. Along with these major investments, shipping companies are also investing heavily in new tonnage, with Irish Ferries, CLdN and Stena leading new build programmes.

These pages cover the following sectoral areas: shipowners, harbour authorities, shipbrokers, freight forwarders and contractors, cruise liner operators, port users, seamen, merchants, academic institutions, shipyards and repair facilities, naval architects, navy and defence personnel.

Our pages are covering some of the most notable arrivals around our coast and reporting too on port development and shipping news.

This section of the site deals with Port and Shipping News on our largest ports Dublin Port, Port of Cork, the Shannon Estuary, Galway Harbour and Belfast Lough.

A recent study carried out for the Irish Ports Association (IPA) totalled 75.7 billion during 2004 and their net economic impact was some 5.5 billion supporting around 57, 500 full time employees.

Liam Lacey, Director of the Marine Institute’s Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) said, “The Irish maritime industry can look to the future with confidence. It has shown itself to be resilient and agile in responding to challenges. Over the past decade, it has had to respond to the challenges of the financial crisis of 2008, the uncertainty surrounding Brexit and recent challenges. Ireland’s maritime sector has continued to underpin our economy by maintaining vital shipping links for both trade and tourism.”