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Displaying items by tag: Cork Harbour

Afloat tracked a heavy-lift vessel berth in Belfast Harbour today having sailed from Dublin Port and from where in both ports project cargoes consisting of container infrastructure had been loaded in Cork Harbour, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The Portuguese flagged heavy-lift vessel UHL Focus arrived in Belfast Harbour this morning to discharge a new STS (ship to shore) container crane for Belfast Harbour Commissioners. The unloading of the unassembled crane manufactured by Liebherr plant in Killarney, is taking place near the H&W Shipyard but downriver along the southern bank of the Lagan.

Prior to the delivery to the Ulster port, UHL Focus had discharged in Dublin Port two new RTG's (rubber tyred gantry) cranes for the Doyle Shipping Group which Afloat contacted to confirm. UHL Focus arrived in the port in the early hours of Monday where operations to discharge the part-cargo in Alexandra Basin along Ocean Pier were completed yesterday afternoon.

The RTG's will in fact be used on location at the neighbouring Alexandra Basin (East) where DSG operate a container terminal. The role of RTG's is a mobile gantry crane used in intermodal operations to ground or stack containers.

The cranes were also manufactured by Liebherr's Co. Kerry plant and according to DSG they were fully assembled and tested at the shipping group's terminal in Cork Dockyard (the former Verolme Cork Dockyard).

On the quayside at the dockyard in Rushbrooke near Cobh, the cranes were loaded on board. UHL Focus then transported them to Dublin Port and where they are ready to go into action in such challenging times where keeping trade flows moving is vital to ensure the economy functions.

In November, Afloat reported on the delivery of a crane for DSG in Dublin Port, but on that occasion the port infrastructure was imported from Liebherr of Germany. The crane was a not for lifting containers but is used at the same terminal to cater for break-bulk cargo handling. 

Published in Ports & Shipping

Cork Harbour Festival and the Ocean to City Race have taken the decision to cancel this year’s events. The festival was due to take place 15 May – 8 June, with the flagship Ocean to City – An Rás Mór on 6 June.

The aim is to reschedule the Cork Harbour Festival and Ocean to City next year, in partnership with SeaFest 2021.

It is worth noting organisers were preparing for the biggest Cork Harbour Festival and Ocean to City to date, with a record number of events as well as early bird race entries.

Next year’s Cork Harbour Festival will take place 5 – 13 June 2021, with the Flagship Ocean to City on 5 June, and we look forward to welcoming you back then.

Published in Cork Harbour

Eddie English's Cork Harbour based Sailing School SailCork will use (free) ZOOM technology next week to provide interactive sessions on several different online pilotage and passage planning destinations.

Each session will last between 45 minutes or 1 hr 15 mins. 

Go-ahead English says 'we have successfully run these courses in lecture format at the Royal Cork Yacht Club for several years. Our updated interactive presentations are even more engaging!'

One of the courses is 'Hidden Cork Harbour' where local experts might even learn a thing or two. 

Cork Harbour MapCork Harbour
English, who has been exploring and discovering Cork harbour for years, promises to 'discover every village, landing stage, hidden creek and slipway'.

The course is presented in a lighthearted fashion with interesting historical notes. Run over three evenings in one-hour sessions the course runs on Tue 31 March, Wed 1 and Thur 2 April. 

Book it here.

Published in How To Sail
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The Covid-19 virus has forced the cancellation of SeaFest, the national maritime festival which was due to take place in Cork in May.

In a statement, the Marine Institute said that a decision was taken to postpone the event until 2021 “in light of the rapidly evolving situation and public health measures due to the coronavirus”

The festival, which was returning to Cork after several years in Galway, was due to take place from May 15th to 17th.

It has drawn record crowds since its initiation, earning a title of the “national ploughing championships of the sea“

European Maritime Day Deferred

The Marine Institute said that European Maritime Day, which was also scheduled to take place in Cork to coincide with “SeaFest”, has also been deferred and new dates are being considered for it.

“In taking this decision our priority was to ensure the health and wellbeing of both exhibitors and visitors at the event,” the Marine Institute said in a statement on Monday afternoon.

"We looked forward to welcoming everyone to SeaFest in 2021," it said.

Published in Maritime Festivals
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In an agreement by the Port of Cork company has been made to the temporary suspension of operations with Cruise Lines as a result of the escalating global COVID-19 outbreak.

Cruise liners that were due to berth (Cork Harbour) between now and April 20th have been cancelled. Cruise operations in the following months are now in question.

The Port has welcomed clarity from the cruise lines in relation to the cancellations, with these decisions being taken in the best interests of public safety.

CEO of the Port of Cork, Brendan Keating says; “We are obviously disappointed that this year’s cruise season has been impacted by COVID-19, but we fully respect the decision of the cruise companies to cancel these calls in the interests of public health. There will be a significant impact on the local community through loss of business, and we fully support Government initiatives to help those businesses trade through difficult times.”

Freight operations are continuing, and the Port expects to accommodate all scheduled vessels in the weeks ahead.

Staff members and visitors at the Port are adopting best practice in terms of social distancing, and as a precaution, inbound ships are subject to strict new guidelines as outlined in a notice to mariners.

The schedule of freight arrivals at the Port of Cork is unaffected by the COVID-19 outbreak. These inbound vessels will carry a range of goods including standard containers, fertiliser, crude oil, and animal feed.

Published in Port of Cork

What motivates a man to buy a wreck over a hundred years old and decide that he can repair her? Why bother and was he ‘mad’ to think of doing so?

My Podcast this week is with a man who has done just that. He is Mark Bushe who lives in Crosshaven in Cork Harbour and hails from the great Bushe family of boat builders, with links back to Baltimore in West Cork and the legendary, George Bushe, a name revered in boating circles in Cork to this day.

Mark restored a legend of Cork sailing – Elsie – a Cork One Design. – the yachts which, after more than a century are still a major part of Cork sailing history.

cork harbouur one designAn archive photo of the Cork Harbour One Design Imp heading seaward in style. This 1895-96 William Fife design is one of many vintage One-Designs still sailing in Ireland which are of special interest to international boat-building schools Photo: Tom Barker

Their story began in 1895 at the then Imperial Hotel in Monkstown, the village across the River Lee from Carrigaloe on the Great Island, the Cobh side of the estuary, where five men formed a group to get a design for new yachts for Cork Harbour from the famous Scottish yacht designer, William Fife. A contract was agreed with Carrigaloe Gridiron and Works Company for the construction of five boats for the then sum of £79 pounds and 10 shillings, excluding sails and fittings. When the five yachts were built, the owners drew lots for their choice of boat. These were to be known as the Cork One Designs and destined to become a backbone of the story of yacht racing in Cork Harbour.

Cork Harbour One Design Else6Elsie, a restored Cork Harbour One Design Photo: Bob Bateman

Cork Harbour One Design Else4Elsie under full sail in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

Cork Harbour One Design Else3Viewed from astern, the restored Cork Harbour One Design Elsie Photo: Bob Bateman

In May of 1999 one of them, Elsie, was vandalised, burned out by vandals and turned into a wreck which Mark Bushe bought a year later. He is my guest on this week’s Podcast and tells of the reaction of his wife when he showed her what he had bought a 100-year-old wreck, which will be one of these great boats sailing again on the waters of Cork Harbour this Summer to mark the 300th anniversary year of the Royal Cork Yacht Club….

Listen to the podcast below

And when you’ve heard the Podcast, this is the situation of the other Cork One Designs as outlined by Mark Bushe:

Elsie (Number 2) is now owned by Cork solicitor, Pat Dorgan and will be racing again this year.

Cork Harbour One Design Else2Restored Cork Harbour One Designs (from left) Maureen, Elsie and Querida in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

  • C4, Jap, after many years on the South Coast of England, has been donated by her owner to the Royal Cork YC and will be sailing in Cork this season.
  • C5, Cygnet, returned to her original name of Little Devil, has been restored by Castlepoint Boatyard and may also be seen afloat soon.
  • C6, Maureen, belonging to the Horgan family, will be sailing this year. She was very badly damaged a number of years ago when hit by a Cork Harbour pilot boat, was rebuilt by Hegarty’s Boatyard and Castlepoint Boatyard.
  • C7, Minx, is fully restored and available for a buyer.
  • C8 Querida, George Radley, credited with reigniting of interest in the One Designs, will also be sailing this season.

The other four boats built, C1 Colleen; C3 Imp; C9 Sybil and C10 Betty have been lost or destroyed. Sybil is on the seabed in Kinsale Harbour, its position is known and she is said to be ‘inhabited by a large conger eel'.

Published in Boatyards
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The visiting French Naval Frigate Latouche-Tréville was alongside in Cork Harbour at the weekend moored at the Cruise Liner berth in Cobh.

As Afloat previously reported, the frigate and her crew of 244 were in the south coast port in aid of the 'Denim Day 4 Dementia' which took place at the Naval Service base on Haulbowline Island.

The ship is one trio of F70 A SM type anti-submarine destroyers, which the French Navy instead classify as a frigate. 

French Naval Frigate Latouche-TrévilleFrench Naval Frigate Latouche-Tréville alongside in Cobh Photo: Bob Bateman

Equipped with Excocet surface to air missiles, the frigate commissioned in 1990 has a helideck and hanger that can handle two Lynx helicopters.

In the summer of 2009, she was filmed in stormy seas as part of the documentary Oceans. See vid below.

Published in Cork Harbour

Cork Harbour has lost a sailing club, which is actually good news for the sport.

If that seems questionable statement, it is not because it brings back together the members of Cove Sailing Club and the Great Island Sailing Club, after a split over ‘differences of attitude and opinion’ as they were described, which occurred due to difficulties in the development of the club’s marina at Whitepoint, just outside the town.

As a result, members who left Cove SC in 2018 set up Great Island Sailing Club to protect and continue, they said, sailing in Cobh. (The club name is spelt differently from the town name).

As the marina project as being progressing satisfactorily and now installation is underway, negotiations between the clubs have been going on. With a positive outcome, Great Island Sailing Club held an EGM to discuss re-joining Cove Sailing Club and a motion to do so was passed unanimously.

“We are looking forward to having a stronger bigger club in Cork Harbour and are very excited with plans for the 2020 season,” said Johanna Murphy, GISC’s Commodore. She confirmed that GISC no longer exists and its members have rejoined Cove SC.

A joint statement from the two clubs said that Cove SC, which celebrated its centenary last year, will continue the Cork Harbour Combined League, which GISC was instrumental in initiating for Cruisers along with the RCYC and Monkstown Bay SC. The Cork Harbour to Dunmore East Race, which was inaugurated last year, will be run by Cove SC at the end of May. It will also be running club events such as the Cove at Home, Cobh People’s Regatta and the Cobh to Blackrock Race.

“The rejuvenated evening dinghy racing will continue this year on Wednesdays throughout the summer as well as the continuation of junior dinghy training. We are also pleased to be hosting the finish of the Dun Laoghaire to Cobh Race (formerly known as the Kingstown-to-Queenstown Race) in association with the National Yacht Club,” said the statement.

Johanna Murphy will continue as Commodore of the South Coast Offshore Racing Association. She is also a member of the Irish Cruiser Racing Association’s board and has been appointed to the Cruiser committee of Cove SC.

On my podcast this week I’m joined by Damian Ahern from Cove Sailing Club’s Committee and who is also a member of their Asset Management Team which is overseeing the new marina installation and other projects within the club. We discuss these developments.

• Listen to the Podcast below.

Published in Tom MacSweeney

Cove Sailing Club is progressing well with its new marina project in Cork Harbour. The gangway, first two breakwaters and landing pontoon are now installed at Whitepoint in Cobh. There have been some setbacks with weather and supplier delays but the club is hopeful that the marina will be completed by April in time for a very busy summer sailing season.

The breakwaters are being constructed in Ringaskiddy and the club has received 'great support' from the Port of Cork and Cork County Council.

As well as the marina, the club is also working on an upgrade of its dinghy park facilities including the addition of a meeting room, office and kitchen facility at the existing dinghy park in Whitepoint Cobh.

The club has a large number of events planned for 2020 and the added marina facility will greatly enhance the clubs offering as a new venue for events on the South coast.

Cove Sailing Club will continue the Cork Harbour Combined League in June along with RCYC and MBSC; we will also be running the usual club events such as the Cove at Home, Cobh Peoples Regatta and the Blackrock Race.

The revised Cobh Trad Sail will take place at the end of June and promises to be a great event run under the Cobh Trad Sail group.

In July, we are also glad to be hosting the finish of the Dun Laoghaire to Cobh Race (formerly known as the Kingstown to Queenstown Race) in association with the National Yacht Club.

The end of July will also see the club host the Squib Southern Championship which promises to be a great event.

The rejuvenated evening dinghy racing will continue this year on Wednesdays throughout the summer as well as the continuation of junior dinghy training.

Published in Cork Harbour
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Cork Harbour sailors will be part of a record-breaking Bacardi Cup Regatta in Miami next week when more than 500 sailors from around the world will race in Biscayne Bay Florida at the 93rd edition of the Cup and Bacardi Invitational Regatta from March 1-7, 2020. 

Ireland's Commodore's Cup-winning captain Anthony O'Leary will race a Viper 640 (named Antix) while sons Peter and Robert are back in their Star boat Archie for the week of competition.

From Myrtleville, North Sails Ireland boss Nigel Young is also Miami bound. Racing under the burgee of Guernsey Yacht Club, Young is racing the Melges 24 Black Seal with Richard Thompson, Mike Claxton, Catherine Alton and William Goldsmith.

See the entry list here.

The O'Leary family are, of course, Bacardi Cup regulars with the brothers coming very close to lifting the prestigious Cup on a race track where they have enjoyed notable previous success.

Offering a unique blend of world-class racing, atmosphere and social events, the Bacardi Cup and Bacardi Invitational Regatta is undoubtedly one of the world’s most prestigious regattas that, in 2020, will welcome a record-breaking 196 entries, attracting an international entry list of professional rock star racers and super-talented Corinthian teams.

The goal is to build on the long tradition of the Star Class and maintain and champion performance in other popular classes, whilst retaining the mix of outstanding racing on Biscayne Bay and superb shore side atmosphere and socials for which the event is renowned.

Across the fleets, sailors from around the USA will be joined by teams representing nineteen countries, including Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Mexico, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Sweden, Switzerland and Thailand. Four courses will operate simultaneously and this year, the iconic Star Class will be joined by the J/70, Melges 24, Viper 640, and brand new for the race track this year are the VXOne sports boat and AV8 and Windfoil classes.

Racing for the Star Class gets underway in Biscayne Bay on Monday 2 March, with the J/70, Melges 24, Viper 640, VXOne and windfoils taking to the track on Thursday 5 March. The Star fleet will contest their traditional one race per day in a true test of endurance relished by the sailors, whilst all other fleets will sail eight races across three days. 

“We have an outstanding race management team who join us for the event and ensure scrupulous attention to detail,” commented Mark Pincus, Regatta Chairman. “We are super pleased to continue our path of innovation by embracing the latest technology and new for this year will be the MarkSetBot robotic mark laying system. These self-propelled marks are controlled by a smartphone and will help us deliver fast mark laying whatever the weather throws at us. The race tracks are complex and unpredictable, ensuring lots of opportunities for teams to really test themselves and guarantee some intense action.”

The largest entry goes to the Star Class where World Champions, Olympians and America’s Cup legends will crowd out the fleet in the pressure battle for the elusive Bacardi Cup title. The Star Class competed at eighteen Olympic Games over eighty years and holds a pedigree for producing legends of the sport and plenty of them will be in Miami. Numerous mainsails will feature the golden Star logo, awarded only to Star Class World Champions, including the renowned Paul Cayard (USA), who has been sailing the Star for over 40 years alongside his successful career in the America’s Cup and big yacht racing. Gold stars on the track will also be carried by two-time World Champion Xavier Rohart (FRA), and 2004 Olympic Bronze medalist and reigning World Champion Mateusz Kusznierewicz (POL), who will be racing with his record five-time Star World Champion crew Bruno Prada (BRA). Kusznierewicz is also a Gold and Bronze Olympic medalist in the Finn class, and Prada is an Olympic Silver and Bronze medalist in the Star. The 2016 Star World Champion and runner up at the 2019 Worlds Augie Diaz (USA) will be racing, as will Diego Negri (ITA) who won the 2018 Bacardi Cup and this year is crewed by the renowned Frithjof Kleen (GER). Looking to trump them all however and keep a tight hold of their title will be the 2019 Bacardi Cup winners, Eric Doyle and Payson Infelise (USA), who will once again hope to enjoy the sweet taste of victory and retain the honour of drinking Bacardi rum from the winner’s trophy come Sunday 7 March.

The J/70 fleet has a compelling line-up of forty teams with the potential to seize the crown, as demonstrated at the two winter warm-up events where different faces claimed the top three standings. Those likely to feature up front include the USA teams headed up by Joel Ronning, Ryan McKillen, John Heaton, Trey Sheehan and Pamela Rose. But equally, some of the newer teams such as Great Britain’s JOLT, which includes plenty of Olympic talent, could pack a punch and change the leaderboard guard. Of course, the reigning J/70 World Champion, Paul Ward (GBR), will no doubt also set the race track rivalry stakes.

Plenty of twists and turns will unfold in the fully-primed Melges 24 fleet, where both the reigning silver and bronze World Championship medalists, Bruce Ayres (USA) and Andrea Pozzi (ITA), will be on the starting line. Amongst those also up for the challenge in the twenty-eight boat fleet will be the best two overall finishers from the two warm-up events here in Miami over the winter, Bora Gulari (USA) and Travis Weisleder (USA), who will resume their neck and neck performance.

Last year’s champion in the Viper 640, Mary Ewenson, returns to defend her title but will have to go through some tough opposition to be on top of the twenty-two other teams on the track. Plenty of talent will join the action across the VXOne, AV8 and Windfoil classes and new heroes will be born.

Published in Star

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