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Displaying items by tag: Cork Harbour

Excalibur RIBs of Cork have been busy this summer not only with a new 65 knot RIB for Round Ireland record holder Philip Fitzgibbon but also with new boats for Civil Defence teams in two locations around the coast. Joe McCollum of Excalibur will deliver a 7m RIB to Mayo Civil Defence on the West coast this week. A 6.5 metre boat for Cork Civil Defence is also due this month. The Cork harbour yard is also completing a 9m full cabin P5 boat for a West Cork commercial application later in the summer. More news from Excalibur at www.ribs.ie or mobile 087 2198651.

Published in RIBs
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The Chairman of the Port of Cork, Mr Dermot O'Mahoney commented on the company's annual results for 2009 stating that the Port of Cork had delivered a resilient performance given the national economic recession. Total traffic at the Port of Cork amounted to 8.3 million tonnes, a decrease of 17.8% on the 10. 1 million tonnes achieved during 2008. This reduction was caused directly by the economic slowdown in the Irish economy since the second half of 2008. Turnover amounted to €20.8 million, a decrease of 20.8%, however an operating profit of €1.5 million after deducting costs including exceptional costs of docker and Lift on – Lift off (LOLO) stevedoring rationalisation of €6.3 million, resulted in a loss on ordinary activities after taxation, of €4.9 million.

Oil traffic which accounts for 60.93% of cargo handled through the Port of Cork decreased by 16.8% to 4.84 million tonnes.  The Port of Cork remains the second busiest Port in Ireland in terms of the number of containers handled, however container traffic reduced by 20% to 148,621 TEU's.  In 2009 containers shipped through the Port of Cork were destined to and from the mainland European ports of Rotterdam, Antwerp and Zeebrugee. Additionally, there is a weekly service linking Ringaskiddy in Cork with Scandinavia, North West Europe and the Mediterranean. Non-oil traffic accounted for 3.48 million tonnes in 2009, a decrease of 789,434 tonnes or 18.47% when compared with the same period in 2008.

Trade figures for the first half of 2010 suggest that there may be a stabalisation in trade as activity levels are generally in line with those of the same period of 2009. Increases in certain trades such as bulks and trade cars and the fact that other trades are starting to consolidate is encouraging.

Mr. O'Mahoney said: "Sustaining the Port business in the current economic climate has required a continued focus on innovation and change in the business practices.   Similar to our customers, the Port of Cork has taken an aggressive position on controlling costs."

Despite challenges of the current economic environment the Port of Cork are continually seeking out new business and trading opportunities and are confident all efforts in this area will be successful in time.

Chief Executive, Mr. Brendan Keating pointed out that The Company's sustained commitment to investment in the Port is a clear demonstration of confidence in the potential for business development and trade growth along with supporting our commitment in providing first class port facilities to customers.

The achievement of higher levels of efficiencies across all Port activities continues to be a priority in maintaining the competitiveness and attractiveness of the Port to customers. A key milestone in this regard was the completion of the Dock Rationalisation Programme in February 2009.  This agreement saw the elimination of the casual dock labour system in the Port.  In addition to improving the competitive position, it will also help improve levels of flexibility and responsiveness to customers thereby making a significant contribution to supporting the drive for business growth.

Mr. Keating said: "The Docker Rationalisation programme presented the Port of Cork Company with the opportunity to enter into an agreement with the Stevedores, which resulted in the Company taking control of all aspects of Lift on Lift off trade in the Port.  This additional milestone agreement, completed in July 2009, has made a dramatic improvement to efficiency and has contributed to long-term competiveness thereby helping secure the future of the Port."

During 2009 the Port of Cork Company undertook a comprehensive review of the planning refusal by An Bord Pleanála for a new container terminal at the Oyster Bank, Ringaskiddy. Arising from this review it was decided to prepare a new Port Strategic Plan a key element of which involved a comprehensive evaluation of suitable sites in Cork Harbour for a new container terminal. Following detailed technical assessments and consideration of all issues raised during the stakeholder engagement, the primary location in the lower harbour for the relocation of port activities from the upper harbour is Ringaskiddy.

Speaking about the outcome of the Strategic Development Plan Review, Mr. Keating said: "Ringaskiddy is already the location of extensive investment in Port facilities where considerablevolumes of port trade are handled. The development of additional Port facilities at this location would mean that demands associated with the world wide trend towards larger vessels could be met in the Port and also the development would be consistent with the objectives of Cork County Development Plan."

However he added it was critical that the upgrade of the N28 should be advanced as a priority action to support the Port and the other vitally important industries located in the Ringaskiddy area.

He continued: "The Port of Cork is confident that new port facilities can be delivered in support of the business and trading needs of the region.  It is a strong belief of the Port of Cork Company that the provision of Port infrastructure capacity is essential in enhancing the economic prospects for Cork City, County and the South West Region."

In 2009, the company hosted 54 cruise ships carrying in excess of 103,000 passengers and crew which contributed in excess of €44 million to the economy of the region. The investments made by the Port of Cork Company in the development of cruise facilities in Cobh is now showing positive returns with booking levels continuing to grow.  The Port of Cork Company is committed to the further development of this business by the investment of additional capital in the next three to five years.

Towards the end of 2009, the Port of Cork implemented a Leisure and Recreation Strategy for Cork Harbour. The primary focus of the strategy is on water based Leisure and Recreation activities in and around Cork Harbour in which the Port of Cork aims to play a leading role in providing and supporting improvements of amenities in these areas. Consultation with community groups, water related clubs, statutory bodies and other interested parties will be an important feature of continuing this strategy in the future. The new Port of Cork City Marina is the first marina facility in the heart of Cork City and a key advance of the Leisure and Recreation Strategy.

Published in Cork Harbour
The final video from Cork Week 2010 at Crosshaven is over the fold .Well done to Marinerscove (Dave Dwyer) and Errislannan (Paul Kirwan), Cork's boats of the week here:
Published in Cork Week

It's no longer of  Boat of the Week but boats of the week at Cork week this evening as Dave Dwyer's Mills 39, Marinerscove.ie and Paul Kirwan's Sigma 38, Errislannan have been jointly awarded Cork's top award. You could feel the tension on the dock, with virtually all the classes still to be decided, as the yachts motored out to the combat zone along the narrow confines of Cork River. The conditions had eased from the previous maelstrom, but this was a day were smart sailing in the combined 197-boat fleet put boats in winning positions.

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Blue Jay won the J109 European Championships at Crosshaven. Photo: Bob Bateman

Watery sunshine, 15 knots from the northwest were to provide some tricky conditions for all classes. Cork Harbour and the surrounding area have huge land effects on the wind, especially today, the gradient made for constant changes.

It proved to be a day for keeping heads out of the boat, looking for changes in the weather. However, that is only one part of the overall puzzle. Boat-on-boat tactics and strong tides are also in the mix. Racing today at Cork Week was like a game of three-dimensional chess.

IRC Super Zero

Johnny Vincent's TP52, Pace came out on top after five days of thrills and spills in the big boat class. Austin Fragomen's TP52, Interlodge was second but only on count back from Gray and Laidlaw's Farr 52, Bob.

Tied on points, Fragomen's TP52, shipped over form the USA to compete at Cork Week beat the Isle of Wight based Farr 52, by the virtue of winning one more race in the eight race series.

The Racing in Super Zero has been sensational this week but also pretty hard on the crew. Andy Oliver is the bowman on Johnny Vincent's TP52, Pace. He first came to Cork Week at just 17 years of age and since then he has raced all over the world;

"I have got to say that was the toughest week I have had for a long time, all of the crew on Pace did a great job, not just the bow but working on the pointed end with the boat screaming along at 24 knots is pretty tough! Cork Week is very unusual, in that it has a huge variety of courses that intensifies crew work. We are all a bit tired, but a fair few of the crew on Pace will be looking forward to a couple of pints of the black stuff in the yacht club after the prize giving."

IRC Zero

Dave Dwyer's Mills 39 Marinerscove.ie had a bad start to the regatta but showed great tenacity to come back with a vengeance to win the highly competitive class on the last race, as tactician Andy Beadsworth explains;

"We have made a few changes to the boat this season, including increasing the sail area to give the boat better light wind performance for the forthcoming Rolex Commodores Cup. A windy Cork Week answered a few questions about how we would go in heavier air. Our two results at the beginning meant we were playing catch up and we just kept chipping away. It has been a great regatta, a real punch-up with some well sailed boats."

Bernard Lambilliotte's Swan 45, Nemo of Cowes haS been the boat to beat in Class Zero, all week and will obviously be disappointed to lose out on the last day. Anthony O'Leary's Ker 39, Antix was third but finished the regatta in good shape.

J 109 European Championship

The crew on Greg Burgess's J 109, Bluejay punched the air with delight, after taking the gun in the first race of the day. All of the crew is from Wales and apart from Burgess, are all young lads as an ecstatic Burgess explains;

'We all go snowboarding together and we have never raced the boat as a crew before. I am 55 but although I am getting old, I feel like an 18 year old today! We didn't expect to win this in our wildest dreams. I stopped racing the boat three years ago, to drive my son around, competing for the British Optimist Team. The crew come from Swansea, Cardiff and North Wales, they have all been sleeping on the boat and partying every night. What a week!"

Brian Moreton's Juke Box was second overall and Ian Nagle and Paul O'Malley's Jelly Baby, snatched third place on the last day from Robert O'Leary's Jeroboam.

IRC One

There was an incredibly close finish in the last race, as the top three boats were separated by 26 seconds, on corrected time. Conor & Denise Phelan's Ker 37, Jump Juice snatched the class title by a single point from Robert Davies' Welsh team on Corby 36, Roxy 6. British Corby 37, Impetuous were third.

These three boats had a titanic struggle all week, especially as they were often side by side on the water. None of them scored worse than a fourth in the seven race series. IRC One produced probably the closest racing of any of the classes racing at Cork Week 2010. Jump Juice were also class champions in 2006.

Conor and Denise are based in Cork and feel Cork Week is a special regatta.

"Since Denise decided to buy Jump Juice, we have raced in the Solent, Scotland and Dun Laoghaire but Cork Week beats them all; the race management is first class and the variety of course and conditions always makes it interesting. We had incredibly close racing this week. It has been absolutely fabulous." Commented a delighted Conor Phelan

IRC Two

Paul O'Higgins' Corby 33, Rockabill V started the regatta in fine form but faltered half way, it was only on the last race that they came back, to clinch the class title from Sailing Logic's Reflex 38, Visit Malta Puma with Rob Mc Connell's A 35, Fool's Gold, finishing strongly to take third.

Paul O'Higgins, owner of Rockall V sums up the week; 'I think the crew on Rockabill V got a bit too complacent after a good start and enjoyed the full facilities of Cork Week, the day before we had a very breezy day, so some of the hard work was our own doing! However, all credit to the opposition, Puma and Fool's Gold sailed well and were worthy opponents."

IRC Three

John Moorehead & Chris Ferres J 35, Bengal Magic have had a cracking week and finished in style by taking a fifth win in the last race of the series but only be 15 seconds from Richard Calveley's Elan 37, Va Va Voom. Ross McDonald's X 332, Equinox will have enjoyed the fresh conditions at Cork Week and claimed second, by some distance from Martin Breen's Harley 33, That's Life!

IRC Four

Paul Kirwan's Sigma 38, Errislannan were assured of both the class title and European Championship and did not compete in the last race. Leaving Paul & Deirdre Tingle's First 31.7, Alpaca and Conor Ronan's Corby 26, Ruthless to battle it out for third. Alpaca beat Ruthless in the last race of the series to take the runner-up spot for the class with Ruthless third overall.

IRC Five

Vincent O'Shea's Corby 25, YANKS $ FFRANCS have had a great Cork Week and won the class by an eight point margin. The Corby 25 is often racing in close quarters with sister-ships and with 14 boats on the start line and many other boats in the race area, this was a factor in their ability to stay out of trouble and win the class.

John Allen's X 302, Antix finished in style, winning the last race of the series by just 29 seconds. Ted Crosbie's x 302, No Excuse was third in class. Event Chairman, Peter Deasy was racing on Sunfast 32, Bad Company. He was disqualified from the last race, proving there is fair racing for all at Cork Week!

IRC Six

O'Brian, Kenefick and Kenefick's Quarter Tonner, Tiger is a real head turning boat and was the only yacht to post straight bullets for the regatta but it wasn't as easy as the score line suggest and it never is, as co-owner, James O'Brian explains;

"Flor O'Driscoll is a top sailor and we had to be at the top of our game this week, especially as we needed to be ahead of him on the water, because of our handicap. It has been a hard week and a fair few of us are over 50, so we are a bit tired to be honest. But I ran this event in 1990 and I have never won it, I didn't think that it would take me 22 years."

Flor O'Driscoll's J 24, Hard on Port was second and Jason Losty's Thomas 25, Woody sailed a very consistent regatta to take third place.

Mixed Sportsboat and SB3 Class

Michael Wilson's 1720, YKnot was in impressive form all week, scoring eight podium finishes to claim the class title. Bryan Hassett's 1720, Dark Side was runner up and the two Hassett brothers were enjoying a pint at the Royal Cork Yacht Club after racing with other 1720 crews. Great racing and camaraderie, is what Cork Week is all about. Malcolm Thorpe's 1720, King Louie won the last race of the series to claim third but only on count-back from Denis Murphy's Aquatack.

Ben Duncan and Brian Moran's Sharkbait bit back after being called OSC in Race 5, to hold off Trevor D'Arcy's Bullet. Race 6 was a photo-finish, with just six seconds separating the two. Bullet won the penultimate race, putting pressure on Sharkbait but they held there nerve to take the last race and the class title by 19 seconds. Ronan Downing's SB3, Ronan Downing's Profile Park was third.

Class winner Ben Duncan was disappointed to miss out on racing on Thursday but he was delighted to come to Cork Week.

"We wanted to race, especially after getting called over the line the previous day but we made the most of it by going for lunch on our enforced lay-day at the stunningly beautiful East Ferry, in Cork Harbour. We have had a great time here in Cork."

White Sail One and Two

46 boats competed in the two classes over the regatta and they enjoyed a picturesque finale to Cork Week 2010 with the Harbour Race. The White Sail fleet are composed of teams that don't want to put together a full on race crew and prefer to sail with a smaller group of family and friends. What's more, many of these boat would not be competitive against the more high performance boats in the other classes. The White Sail Class gets them off the moorings and out into some of the best sailing grounds in the world.

In White Sail One, Philip Dilworth's Grand Soleil 40 was the winner and in Class Two, McCarthy, Clarke & McMullin's Half Tonner Harmony was first in class.

A huge crowd witnessed the prize giving, held at the Royal Cork Yacht Club, shortly after racing. Officiated by Cork Week Event Chairman, Peter Deasy and RCYC Admiral, Paddy McGlade.

It was decided that the Boat of the Week for Cork Week 2010 should be jointly awarded.

Joint Boat of the Week
Dave Dwyer's Mills 39, Marinerscove.ie
Paul Kirwan's Sigma 38, Errislannan

The Prix d'Elegance Trophy
Philip Scully's Custom Oyster 82, Starry Night of the Caribbean

The Sisk Trophy for best Corinthian yacht
Neil Martin's J 133, Jammy Dodger

Published in Cork Week

Looking more like a leg from the Volvo Ocean Race, Cork Week yesterday enjoyed an epic day four and this Digby Fox video (below) proves it! A 20 knot ripper!

Published in Cork Week

Photographer Bob Bateman followed the five super zero yachts today as winds at Cork week hit 20 knots. Report HERE.

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Published in Cork Week

Well it doesn't get better than this; gusting over 20 knots with wind over tide, kicking up the surf, the penultimate day of Cork Week was a day for some ballistic racing and a few dramatic sailing moments writes Louay Habib.

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Full speed: TP52 Paprec Recyclage blew a headsail today. Photo: Bob Bateman

Super Zero

Racing kicked off with a beat across the approach to Cork Harbour in the open sea to Ringabella Bay for the big boat class. There was drama right at the start, as Stephane Neve's TP52 Paprec Recyclage came off a huge wave and down with a thump, blowing out their head sail. It took the French team minutes to recover, as the rest of the fleet blasted to windward. Austin Fragomen's TP52 Interlodge rounded the top mark first with Johnny Vincent's TP52, Pace in hot pursuit. They hoisted kites, exploding down the run at a good twenty knots, in a ball of spray.

The IRC Zero fleet then headed off into the confines of Cork Harbour and as if going in for half time, the harbour provided some refuge from the big breeze outside. Then it was back into the combat zone outside the harbour for some more on the edge surfing. The crew on Laidlaw and Gray's Farr 52, Bob, could hardly contain themselves; fully hiked out downwind, they were spotted whooping with delight, as they turbo charged through the surf, like a guided missile.

Austin Fragomen's TP52, Interlodge took the gun and the race win on big Thursday, Austin has wanted to do Cork Week for some time and helmed the boat in some truly awesome conditions. Not a bad effort for a man well past retirement age.

Johnny Vincent's Pace took second place in the race, to keep a two point lead overall. Interlodge are second and Bob third.

Irish Star Olympic sailor, Peter O'Leary has been sailing with Interlodge all week and had this to say after racing;

"The team have really enjoyed the week so far and today was just some of the best sailing that you can get. We had one big spin out, as a big puff came down off the headland, off Robert's Cove. We had a couple of trips down the mine, as we surfed into the waves in front of us, sending green water all the way down the deck."

J 109 European Championship

There were thrills and spills in the J 109 fleet today. The asymmetric one designs were truly launched downwind today and title contender, Robert O'Leary's Jeroboam, was flying when the pole failed to take the strain and buckled under load, forcing them to retire, pushing them down to third overall. John Maybury's Joker II got into difficulties on the lea-shore behind Roches Point. Bowman, Sean Paul White, bravely climbed the rig to free the tangled spinnaker but all on board were unhurt in the incident.

Today's race was won by Ken Grant's Scottish crew on Tigh Soluis, who get plenty of practice in these conditions. Brian Moreton's Juke Box was only 22 seconds behind and remains in second place for the title. Greg Burgess's Blue Jay did not fair as well today, coming 8th, but is still the overall leader for the J 109 European Championship.

IRC Zero

Anthony O'Leary's Ker 39, Antix was impressive today, winning by just over two minutes, O'Leary explains that crew work was paramount today.

"We have plenty of practice gybing in heavy weather and coming back downwind from Ringabella Bay, we put in a couple of great moves which was a key to our success."

Dave Dwyer's Mills 39, Marinerscove.ie was second in today's race. Richard Matthews, Humphreys 42, Oystercatcher XXVI went around the course like a rocket ship to take line-honours but were third on corrected time. Going into the last day. Nemo of Cowes leads the class but only by two points from Marinerscove.ie. So still all to play for in this very competitive class.

IRC One

Robert Davies' Corby 36, Roxy 6 had another great day, posting their third win on the trot but by a slender ten second margin, in an adrenalin pumping race lasting over three hours. With just one day to go, Roxy 6 is just a point ahead of Conor and Denise Phelan's Ker 37, Jump Juice. Richard Fildes Corby 37, Impetuous is only four points adrift. These three boats are pretty evenly matched for speed, expect some fireworks tomorrow.

IRC Two

Rob Mc Connell's X 35, Fools Gold reveled in the heavy going winning their first race at Cork Week 2010. Sailing Logic's Reflex 38, Visit Malta Puma were second but probably blew it right at the finish. Cutting it fine to lay the line, a big gust came down the track forcing them to spill out right in front of the finishing vessel. Paul O'Higgins Corby 33, Rockabill V had an early lead but eventually dropped back to third.

With one race to go, it could not be tighter with Rockabill V and Visit Malta Puma both on 12 points. Donal O'Leary's X 35, D-TOX could only manage 13th today but are still in third overall.

IRC Three

John Moorehead & Chris Ferres j 35, Bengal Magic have a six point cushion at the top of the class, scoring their fourth series win today on a triangular course inside the harbour. Ross McDonald's X 332, Equinox was second today and retains the runner up spot overall.

Dermot Cronin's J 35, Mumbo retired today with minor boat damage and is under serious threat from Martin Breen's Harley 33, That's Life! who were third today and are now only half a point off a podium place.

IRC Four

Paul Kirwan's Sigma 38, Errislannan was unstoppable in today's heavy weather race. Powering home to take the gun and a fourth bullet in the regatta, by just over two minutes. Paul & Deirdre Tingle's First 31.7, Alpaca could only manage fifth today but are still in second place overall. Conor Ronan's Corby 26, Ruthless has closed the gap and are only two points behind Alpaca with one day to go.

IRC Five

Ian Byrne's Sunfast 32, Sunburn had a disappointing day yesterday but the Howth Yacht Club boat had their best day at Cork Week today Winning by over a minute on correct time from John Allen's X 302 Antix. Ted Crosbie X 302 No Excuse was third. Vincent O'Shea's Corby 25, YANKS $ FFRANCS could only manage ninth place today but still leads the class overall by a twelve point margin. Mathematically, YANKS $ FFRANCS can still be over-taken, but it seems very likely that IRC Three is in the bag.

IRC Six

O'Brien, Kenefick & Kenefick are home but probably not dry after a feisty day on the water. Racing Quarter Tonner, Tiger must have been like a wild ride on a bucking bronco. Tiger have a straight set of bullets from six races. Flor O'Driscoll's J 24, Hard on Port was second, by under a minute on corrected time which almost assures Tiger of the class title. Jason Losty Custom 25, Woody was third today and is vying for third overall with Clem McElligott's Sigma 33, Sea Hawk.

Mixed Sportsboat

Malcolm Thorpe's King Louie was today's winner, scoring their first bullet of the regatta by a fair margin from Bryan Hassett's Dark Side. Michael Wilson's Yknot was third in the only race of the day but still holds the class lead by a three point margin, going into the last day of the regatta.

White Sail One and Two

A fair number of the White Sail fleet did not race today, Cork Week is a great place to race but also to watch and there is no doubt that many of the competitors in this non-spinnaker class were out witnessing some of the high performance boats honing around the race track.

There were familiar names to the winners in the White Sail Classes today; Philip Dilworth's Grand Soleil 40, Orna won today's race by over three minutes from Kevin Lane's Dufour 40, Aisha and Dan O'Neill's IMX 38 Xerxes in third. In White Sail Two, McCarthy, Clarke & McMullin's Half Tonner, Harmony beat Billy Duane's Sunlight 30 by over a minute. Tom McNeice's Sigma 33, Minx III did not come to the starting area but still retains third place overall.

Two races are scheduled for tomorrow, the last day for Cork Week 2010. There will be a few sore muscles, after the testing conditions today, but the race village is still buzzing with life. The most popular spot after racing is the bar at the Royal Cork Yacht Club. No doubt a few more stories were told there today, to add to the 290 year history.

High speed photos HERE.

 

Published in Cork Week

The Minister for Defence, Mr. Tony Killeen, TD, with his cabinet colleague the Minister for Finance, Mr. Brian Lenihan, TD, were today, at the Naval Service Base in Haulbowline, Cork to welcome home the Naval Service vessel the L.E. Niamh from her ten week mission to Latin America.

This deployment was in support of the strong cultural and heritage links between Ireland and South America, to mark the celebration of the bicentenaries of independence by Mexico, Argentina, and Chile, and to promote Ireland and Irish trade links in these countries.

The Captain of the LE Niamh is Lieutenant Commander Kenneth Minehane, a native of Bantry, Co. Cork, and there were 46 crew on the mission.

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LE Niamh arrives back into Haulbowline today. Photo: Bob Bateman

Speaking on the LE Niamh in Cork Minister Killeen said "The trade and diplomatic mission to Latin America, which was undertaken by the LE Niamh, was a significant initiative from Ireland's perspective and is an example of the continued effective inter-departmental cooperation, particularly in the area of trade. The Captain and crew of the ship have carried out excellent work on behalf of the State in furthering our national interests in the region. I would like to commend them on their achievements and thank them for their service."

Minister Killeen continued "I am delighted to be able to announce today that following discussions with my cabinet colleague Mr. Brian Lenihan, T.D., Government approval has been received for the Department of Defence and the Naval Service to enter into discussions with UK based shipbuilder Babcock Marine, with a view to finalising negotiations for the purchase of two new Naval Service Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs).

The decision to proceed with the final award of the contract to purchase the OPV's is subject to these negotiations reaching a satisfactory outcome. I hope to be in a position to make a formal announcement regarding the award of the contract for the new OPV's by November 2010. However, as you can appreciate, as negotiations are ongoing it would be inappropriate for me to comment further on them at this time except to wish the officials in the Department of Defence and the Naval Service well in these negotiations".

Minister Lenihan said "I am also pleased to be here in Haulbowline this afternoon with Minister Killeen for this major announcement. I am especially pleased that in agreeing the Defence Estimates for 2011 it has been possible to provide for this key defence priority."

The older naval ships have a nominal lifespan of 30 years. By 2015, all but two of the current flotilla of eight Naval vessels will be at least 30 years old (which is the normal maximum lifespan of such vessels). The continued use of older vessels is expensive in terms of both maintenance and, more importantly, loss of days on patrol. Notwithstanding increased inspections, maintenance and repair, it is not recommended that any vessel should remain in service beyond 35 years.

The three oldest vessels, LE Emer commissioned in 1978, LE Aoife commissioned in 1979 and LE Aisling commissioned in 1980, remain in service through a programme of continuous planned and preventative maintenance and inspections. These inspections have recently resulted in extensive repairs being carried out to all three vessels with holes in the hull plating of each being detected and repaired in the course of dry docking. All three vessels were out of service for approximately 6 weeks.

Minister Killeen added "The acquisition of two new modern vessels will ensure that the Naval Service continues to be fully equipped to carry out its day to day roles in enforcing the State's sovereign rights over our waters and our fisheries and meeting Ireland's obligations in the area of maritime safety and security and fisheries protection. I am acutely aware of the difficulties for Irish fishermen arising from the damage inflicted by over fishing of some key stocks off our coast. The Naval Service plays a significant role in helping to return these stocks to sustainability."

Published in Navy

Second video installment from Digby Fox in Crosshaven. Big Seas and big breeze on Day three of Cork Week.

We'll be knocking another out tonight, and a final tomorrow night.
We'll be knocking another out tonight, and a final tomorrow (Friday) night. See Below.

 

Published in Cork Week

Big breeze and big seas created some mind-boggling action at Cork Week on Day Three writes Louay Habib. Torrential rain in the early morning, gave way to some sublime sunshine giving the competitors some classic Irish sailing. 15-18 Knots of breeze from the south with wind over tide, created swell with waves reaching three metres at times.

“I have been to every Cork Week bar one since 1988. Today was my favourite course, the Harbour Course. The big boats will be there on Friday. Where else can you see boats like that racing inside a natural harbour?”

Flor O'Driscoll, winner of Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2009

 

 


 

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Action from a breezy day three. Photo: Tim Wright

 


 

IRC Super Zero
The carbon-fibre flyers were racing on the tactical windward leeward course with the stunning backdrop of rocks near Roberts Cove. These boats light up in big conditions and the TP52s were an awesome sight surfing through the waves.

Gray and Laidlaw’s Solent based Farr 52, Bob and Austin Fragomen’s American TP52, Interlodge won a race each today putting pressure on Johnny Vincent, TP52, Pace who is still top of the class but Bob is now just two points behind them. Paprec Recyclage and Interlodge are tied for third place just behind the front two runners.

Many of the crew on Gray and Laidlaw’s Farr 52, Bob have sailed on the boat since she was first built in 2000. John Brinkers is one and was pleased with their performance today.

“That was tough going, especially the sea state, we got nailed a bit in the first race when the breeze died down for a stage of the race. The TP52s had made their time on us and in the fading breeze we couldn’t catch them up but we sailed well in the second race. Bob got a great start and managed to hang onto the TP52s upwind and rounded pretty much with them. The big call of the day came on the second lap. We spotted a shift and took a different side of the course to the other boats, we got right back at them to take our first win and put us right in the mix.”


IRC Zero

David Dwyer’s Mills 39, Marinerscove.ie had another solid day, posting a first and a third, pouring pressure on the class leader. Bernard Lambilliotte’s Swan 45, Nemo of Cowes is still leading but the margin has shrunk to just four points ahead of Marinerscove.ie. Kieran Twomey’s Corby 38, Gloves Off with Irish Olympic sailor, Mark Mansfield at the helm, is third on tie-break with French Ker 39, Inis Mor owned by Bernard Gouy.


IRC One
It was all smiles on Robert Davies, Corby 36, Roxy 6. Two races and two bullets sneaked them into first place on the leader board by virtue of more first places than Conor Phelan’s Ker 37, Jump Juice. These two are both locked on nine points with Richard Fildes’s Corby 37, Impetuous, still very much in the hunt, on eleven points.

J/109 European Championship
Greg Burgess’ Blue Jay had a perfect day on the Olympic Course and now have a commanding lead in their quest to win the European crown. There were two bullets today for the Welsh team of young Cardiff Bay J 80 sailors led by Burgess. Brian Moreton’s Jukebox is having a consistent set of results and was rewarded by claiming second place overnight. Robert O’Leary’s Jeroboam did not have the best of days and drops down to third.

IRC Two
Donal O'Leary’s X 35, D-TOX had a sensational day on the water, winning both of today’s races and propelling them above Paul O’Higgins’ Corby 33, Rockabill V and Sailing Logic’s Reflex 38, Visit Malta Puma. The IRC Two Class was on the Olympic Course today with the fleet screaming down the reach in flat water and excellent breeze. The class looks set to go to the wire, with the top three boats only separated by a single point, after discard.

IRC Three
This morning, John Moorehead & Chris Ferres J 35, Bengal Magic had won every race but they were not as flash today on the Slalom Course. This allowed title contenders to close the gap; Ross McDonald’s X 332, Equinox reveled in the heavy weather in the second race, taking their first win at Cork Week. Dermot Cronin’s J 35, Mumbo is in third.

IRC Four
Paul Kirwan’s immaculate Sigma 38,  Errislannan got back on track today, posting two wins by a handsome margin on the Slalom Course. Errislannan leads the class by four points. Paul & Deirdre Tingle’s First 31.7 Alpaca is second with Conor Ronan Corby 26, Ruthless in third. Tomorrow the class head for the Olympic Course, if the forecast heavy weather continues, expect the Sigma 38s to feature, especially Errislannan.

IRC Five
Vincent O’Shea’s YANKS $ FFRANCS is a light fast, Corby 25 and today’s lumpy conditions were not ideal but the team started and sailed the boat with precision and determination. Taking second place in the only race of the day, to keep a stranglehold on the Class. Denis Coleman’s sistership, Thunderbird did not fair as well, coming seventh in the only race of the day for the class and remains in second place but lost precious ground on the class leader. John Allen’s X 302, Antix still lies in third place.

IRC Six
This class is looking like turning into a two-horse race between skippers who know the marvelous stretch of water as well as anyone. James O'Brien, Kenefick & Kenefick’s Quarter Tonner, Tiger and Flor O’Driscoll’s J 24, Hard on Port. The Kenefick family live right on the Cork River, opposite the Royal Cork Yacht Club and Flor O’Driscoll was born in Cork and has sailed here all his life. Tiger has a straight run of five bullets but Hard on Port has been giving Tiger a good fight. Tomorrow, Flor’s team on the J 24 will need to beat Tiger on the multi-manoevre slalom course, if they are to have any chance of winning the class. O’Driscoll will be a happy man, win or lose, as he explains;
“I have been to every Cork Week bar one since 1988. Today was my favourite course, the Harbour Course. The big boats will be there on Friday. Where else can you see boats like that racing inside a natural harbour?”

Mixed Sportsboat and SB3 Class
Michael Wilson’s 1720, YKnot didn’t win either of today’s two races but two second places cemented their position at the top of the class. Bryan Hassett’s 1720, Darkside and sistership, Denis Murphy’s Aquatack, both scored victories today but slipped up in the accompanying races to fall behind YKnot. Tomorrow sees them tackle the tricky Slalom Course.

Ben Duncan & Brian Moran’s SB3 Sharkbite had a shocker today; being called over the start line on the Harbour Course picking up an 11th place. They are still leading, by virtue of discarding the race but are now far more vulnerable than this morning. Trevor D'Arcy’s SB3 Bullet lies in wait, just four points behind Sharkbait. The SB3 Class is back in the balance. Ronan Downing SB3, Profile Park, also fell foul at the start but still lies in third place.

White Sail One & Two
Philip Dilworth’s Grand Soleil 40, Orca enjoyed some fast reaching on the Trapezoid Course to win both of today’s races by a huge margin and is red hot favorite to win White Sail One. Kevin Lane’s Dufour 40, Aisha leads the chasing pack. Charles Broadhead, Jerry Collins and Ian Stuart Sigma 38, Persistance moves up to third.

White Sail Two is looking to have a clear favourite, Jerome McCarthy, Clarke & McMullin’ s Half Tonner, Harmony took a brace of wins today. The Rob Humphreys yacht was built in 1980 by RJ Priors and Sons and won a huge number of races at the height of IOR racing. Billy Duane’s Sunlight 30, Expression had another great day on the water. The 30 footer was dwarfed by the sea swell and excellent seamanship resulted in two second place finishes. Tom McNeice’s Sigma 33, Minx III failed to come to the starting area but still remains third.

Tomorrow, the forecast will be for some mighty big weather in and around the shores of Cork Harbour. However the weather this week has been very unpredictable and highly volatile, so who knows! Tomorrow is the penultimate day of Cork Week 2010, if the big boats do go out, it will be on the most exposed part of the racing area.

This evening the sun is out and setting over the tented village around the Royal Cork Yacht Club. Competitors will be looking forward to a concert on the main stage featuring Rock ‘n’ Roll band, FRED. Last night, The Marvels turned the dance floor into a sea of jumping party people, Cork Week will surely be rocking again tonight.

Provisional Results (subject to protest)

Super 0: 1 Pace (Johnny Vincent); 2 Bob (Gray, Laidlaw); 3 Paprec Recyclage (Ph Finance, Stephane Neve);

IRC 0: 1 Nemo Of Cowes (Richard Cotter); 2 Marinerscove.Ie (David Dwyer); 3 Gloves Off (Kieran Twomey);

IRC 1: 1 Roxy 6 (Robert Davies); 2 Jump Juice (Conor Denise Phelan); 3 Impetuous (Richard Fildes);

I RC 2: 1 D-Tox (Donal O'Leary); 2 Rockabill V (Paul O'Higgins); 3 Visit Malta Puma (Sailing Logic Limited);

IRC 3: 1 Bengal Magic (John Moorehead Chris Ferres); 2 Equinox (Ross McDonald); 3 Mumbo (Dermot Cronin);

IRC 4: 1 Errislannan (Patrick Kirwan); 2 Alpaca (Paul Deirdre Tingle); 3 Ruthless (Conor Ronan);

IRC 5: 1 Yanks $ Ffrancs (Vincent O'Shea); 2 Thunderbird (Denis Coleman); 3 Antix (John Allen);

IRC 6: 1 Tiger (James O'Brien, Kenefick Kenefick); 2 Hard On Port (Flor O'Driscoll); 3 Sea Hawk (Clem McElligott);

J109 1 Bluejay (Greg Burgess); 2 Jeroboam (Rob O'Leary); 3 Juke Box (Brian Moreton);

1720/Mixed Sports Boats: 1 Yknot (Michael Wilson); 2 Dark Side (Bryan Hassett); 3 Aquatack (Denis Murphy);

SB3 : 1 Sharkbait (Ben Duncan Brian Moran); 2 Bullet (Trevor D'Arcy); 3 Profile Park (Ronan Downing);

White Sail 1: 1 Orna (Philip Dilworth); 2 Aisha (Kevin Lane); 3 Persistance (Charles Broadhead, Jerry Collins & Ian Stuart);

White Sail 2 1 Harmony (Jerome McCarthy, Clarke & McMullin); 2 Expression (Billy Duane); 3 Minx III (Tom McNeice);

 

Published in Cork Week
Page 72 of 74

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