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Displaying items by tag: Crosshaven Boatyard

Dufour’s new Flagship, the sleek-looking Dufour 61 designed by Felci Yacht Design, will be undertaking sea trials in the next few weeks in La Rochelle. The new Dufour 61 will be quick but stable and very easy to handle, according to Irish agent Hugh Mockler of Crossghaven Boatyard in Cork Harbour.

Her sail controls are lead back to each helm station for easy access. Her mainsheet is on an arch which allows a better sheeting angle and keeps it clear of the cockpit. She has an excellent choice of sail configurations, including the option of in-mast furling mainsail and self-tacking jib.

Dufour 61 aft cockpit bed and table. There is plenty of seating and sunbathing areas, both around the central cockpit table and on a stunning aft sun-loungerThe Dufour 61's aft cockpit bed and table. There is plenty of seating and sunbathing areas, both around the central cockpit table and on a stunning aft sun-lounger

Her many advantages include a large dinghy garage, spacious cockpit, sunbathing areas, two cockpit tables and large windows giving loads of light to her amazing saloon. She has a number of layout options below including the forward galley which Dufour have perfected with the option of an aft galley. Dufour have also given her an even more luxurious feel below by adding extra soft furnishings and more upmarket fittings. She also has an endless list of option i.e. bow and stern thrusters, generator, water-maker the list goes on!

Dufour 61's bathing platform, bbq and garage.There is easy access direct to the aft bathing platform and large dinghy garage, suitable for housing a tender and life raft.Dufour 61's bathing platform, bbq and garage.There is easy access direct to the aft bathing platform and large dinghy garage, suitable for housing a tender and life raft.

Mockler says that as soon as travel restrictions are lifted and travel is safe, it will be possible to set up a sail test in La Rochelle. Dufour’s plan at the moment is to present the yacht at Boot Dusseldorf in April and then undertake a tour of the Mediterranean. The new Dufour 61 with an overall length of 63 feet will certainly turn a few heads”.

Dufour 61's aft sunbeds. There is plenty of seating and sunbathing areas, both around the central cockpit table and on a stunning aft sun-lounger, situated between the two helm stations, and  cleverly designed to also convert into another table with bench seatsDufour 61's aft sunbeds. There is plenty of seating and sunbathing areas, both around the central cockpit table and on a stunning aft sun-lounger, situated between the two helm stations, and cleverly designed to also convert into another table with bench seats

Design and build process

On smaller yachts, typically their design incorporates an inner matrix system that is bonded to the hull to create the required core strength. With the increased loads of a yacht the size of the '61 it is necessary to create a much stronger, rigid structure that will sail upwind without deflection or movement of the internal components. To create this, the hull has been made from a monobloc structure using an 'infusion process' which allows exact control of the production process. The main bulkheads are made from solid GRP and laminated directly onto the hull and deck, all of which create a highly robust single structure, stiff hull and deck for ultimate sailing performance which Dufour consider essential for a yacht of this size.

Hull & sail plan

Long hull chines offer a stable hull with increased performance as well as creating added volume below decks, all set off with Dufour's signature half-butterfly portholes.

With an overall sail area of 170m2, the yacht is supplied with optional in-mast or a traditional mainsail, self-tacking or overlapping headsails plus options to fly a variety of downwind sails from the integrated fixed bowsprit.

Deck layout

The coach roof ends at the mast base to create a clean and spacious foredeck and wide side decks allow easy movement around the deck. Importantly, the hull to deck joint is fully hidden with the teak side decks elegantly disguising the moulding lines

Numerous hand-holds together with a raised bulwark give greater security when moving around the deck at sea. Integrated in the bulwarks are smart courtesy lights to illuminate the decks at night.

Generous natural light floods below decks through a single moulded black plexiglass roof, which contrasts beautifully with the side decks and coachroof.

Cockpit layout

The cockpit has been carefully designed to separate the functional elements of sailing with other areas offered for relaxation.

All the hidden control lines run under the decks and are led aft to each helm station, both with large seats offering better comfort when sailing and all the necessary instrumentation equipment to ensure safe and easy navigation.

Movement around the cockpit is simple and unhindered, with large, moulded steps integrated into the coaming for safe and easy access up to the side decks.

An innovative split bimini allows easy circulation on board, without ducking or restricted headroom. The black carbon fibre arch clears the cockpit and entrance below as well as allowing the mainsheet control system to be at the end of the boom for less pressure and easier control.

With a spacious cockpit, fully enclosed on both sides, there is easy access direct to the aft bathing platform and large dinghy garage, suitable for housing a tender and life raft.

There is plenty of seating and sunbathing areas, both around the central cockpit table and on a stunning aft sun-lounger, situated between the two helm stations, and cleverly designed to also convert into another table with bench seats. It's the perfect spot, at the back of the cockpit, for breakfast or refreshments after a swim from the generous bathing platform. Beneath this rear bench sits the now legendary Dufour exterior galley, with barbeque, sink and fridge – for relaxed alfresco catering and socialising.

Below decks

The key distinction between the two layouts is the option to choose between a forward or aft galley layout.

In broad terms, the forward galley layout is intended for those owners not requiring a dedicated skipper's cabin aft. Generously appointed, the galley integrates with the main living space enabling sociable catering and hospitality, perfect for hosting families and friends. With a traditional layout of 2 aft double guest cabins, a generous master cabin forward and optional side Pullman cabin, there is also the option for a crew cabin forward, that is accessed from on deck.

Alternatively, the discreetly positioned port side aft galley which leads to a dedicated skipper's cabin, is the ideal layout for onboard catering and hosting. Again, there are additional Pullman cabin options to maximise accommodation.

On all models the master cabin is as luxurious as it is spacious, offering private relaxation space, as well as plenty of large wardrobe and storage cupboards. The beds are full 'home-sized' and come with real mattresses and optional slatted bases for support and ventilation.

Both layouts offer a generous and spacious interior living area and galleys with excellent storage space and a high-capacity fridge/freezer.

As is a now a familiar signature of all modern Dufour models, the cabins and living areas are flooded with plenty of natural daylight through large windows, deck hatches and portholes.

A dedicated navigation table is situated in the main saloon, along with a large bench sofa and an extendable dining table with extensive seating capacity. High quality wood is used throughout with a choice of interior woods and finishes.

Published in Crosshaven Boatyard

With the rise in COVID-19 cases and in line with Government guidelines, Crosshaven Boatyard has no option but to close its gates for the time being.

In a statement on social media, the Cork Harbour boatyard appealed for private boat owners to have patience under the current restrictions, which will remain in place until at the least the end of January.

Those within the 5km travel radius may visit to check on their vessels, but are asked to come alone and not to carry out any works.

“If for any reason you feel the need to have your boat checked, please contact the office and we can arrange one of our staff to do this on your behalf,” the boatyard said, adding that staff will be at hand for emergency haul-outs.

The boatyard will also still support essential services such as commercial fishing, Department of Defence, science and research, the RNLI and Port of Cork.

The team added: “Finally we would like to thank you all for your continued support and we look forward to seeing you all back in the water boating once again. Stay safe.”

Crosshaven Boatyard recently changed hands, and new owner Pearse Flynn shared details of his plans to make its facilities the backbone of offshore wind farm services.

Published in Crosshaven Boatyard

Green Rebel Marine with a base at Crosshaven Boatyard in Cork Harbour has announced the €1.5 million purchase of a DA42 multi-purpose aircraft to conduct aerial surveys off the Irish coast.

Thousands of square miles of ocean are due to undergo ecological assessment as part of the planning process for offshore wind farms

The new aircraft will be based at Cork Airport, and will result in the creation of fifteen new jobs. These jobs are in addition to the eighty announced by Green Rebel Marine in September. 

With the purchase of its own survey aircraft, Green Rebel Marine will be the only domestic Irish company offering digital aerial surveys for offshore wind development companies. 

The twin-engined DA42 MPP is rated as best in class in terms of fuel efficiency and emissions, and is equipped with high-performance aerial cameras to conduct ecological surveys. 

Green Rebel Marine was established earlier this year to service the future needs of offshore wind farms. The company has already acquired Crosshaven Boatyard in County Cork, and the first in a fleet of survey vessels, the Bibby Athena.

Plans for offshore wind farms are at an advanced stage with a number of potential fixed and floating operators examining sites along the coast from Dundalk in County Louth, to the Cork coast and beyond. Their construction will not only increase Ireland’s ability to produce renewable energy, it will also create an entire new sector dedicated to servicing their operation. 

Sarah Kandrot, Head of Aerial Surveys with Green Rebel Marine, says, “Off-shore energy is part of the green revolution, however the granting of licences for these wind farms is dependent on detailed surveys of the ocean to catalogue the ecology of the target areas. The purchase of this aircraft means that large sections can be digitally surveyed over a shorter period of time, with the aircraft flying at heights that will not disturb birds or marine megafauna. Ultimately, the information we compile will ensure that offshore wind farms are built in the best locations to protect the ecology of the ocean.” 

Green Rebel Marine founder Pearse Flynn says, “The purchase of the survey aircraft, along with the first in our fleet of survey vessels, means that Green Rebel Marine is leading the charge towards sustainable and renewable energy off the Irish coast. This is an industry that will sustain thousands of jobs while transforming Ireland into a net generator of electricity. The oceans around Ireland are a vital resource, and the quality survey work being undertaken by Green Rebel Marine will help to both protect that resource while harnessing its potential.” 

The Green Rebel Marine aircraft will be permanently based at Cork Airport once it enters full-time operation early next year.

Niall MacCarthy, Managing Director at Cork Airport, said: “2020 has been a tough year for everybody so it’s great to be starting 2021 with a good news story. Recovery and jobs will be THE theme for 2021 and an aircraft based with us in Cork which helps create new jobs particularly in the green energy sector is very welcome. The Green Rebel Marine Diamond Aviation 42 aircraft will be based at the Weston General Aviation Hangar at Cork Airport and we wish them every success in this exciting new offshore wind venture.”

Published in Crosshaven Boatyard

The photomontage published in Afloat a week ago of 60 'supersize' wind turbines planned for Dublin Bay should raise substantial debate about the impact of offshore wind farms on Irish waters and the activities in them – sailing, leisure marine, fishing and commercial.

There are so many proposals now being forward, with billions of Euros involved, in response to the Government's stated intention to drive forward wind energy, that it becomes challenging to keep track of them all. "Public consultation" is promised, but what does that exactly mean and how effective is this process?

The proposal for the Kish and Bray Banks is about six nautical miles offshore, so for many leisure mariners that might not seem to be considered as a major issue, or problem. However, the 60 turbines would be 310 metres in height - over a thousand feet - pretty substantial on the seascape.

Dublin Array: Likely view from Dún Laoghaire towards Sandycove and out towards the Kish Bank.Dublin Array: Likely view from Dún Laoghaire towards Sandycove and out towards the Kish Bank.

The Arklow Bank Wind Park, as it's called, is also six miles offshore. Phase 2, for 76 turbines, is under public consultation and there is a lease area 27 km long and 2.5 km wide.

The developers of these and other projects have initiated public consultation. Projects are promoted as essential for energy and environmental purposes, but there is less, if any, reference in publicity to the profits.

So what does "consultation" mean?

Too often, as a journalist, it seems to me that "consultation" is seen by developers as a necessary process to be gone through, indicating that the public has been consulted. But with what effect? Is debate sufficiently focused on the effects on leisure, sailing, fishing, commercial, marine life, species? Is there not a need, in response to the proliferation of proposals, for more widespread debate and more intensive focus, practical discussion and a wider, co-operative approach and not only through the State process administered and controlled by officialdom >

In this regard, I have been talking to the man who has bought Crosshaven Boatyard in Cork Harbour to set up a business "to service the future needs of offshore wind farms." Pearse Flynn of Green Rebel Marine has set up a "strategic partnership" with Fisheries Liaisons Ltd., to develop communication "with the wider marine and fishing community as development of offshore wind farms picks up pace." It seems an interesting approach to "consultation."

Listen to him on the Podcast below.

Published in Power From the Sea

Green Rebel Marine, the Cork-based business established to service the future needs of offshore wind farms, has announced a new strategic partnership with Fisheries Liaisons Ltd. The partnership is seen as being a key factor in communicating with the wider marine and fishing community as development of offshore wind farms picks up pace.

Fisheries Liaisons Ltd has been a strong supporter of fishing communities across the island of Ireland in their dealings with other off-shore operators. The company has a strong reputation for engagement with communities fishing in Irish coastal waters ahead of the arrival of new entrants to the offshore market.

The relationship between Fisheries Liaisons Limited and Green Rebel Marine is designed to ensure coastal communities are consulted with in advance of any work, and fully informed of the latest developments involving wind farm operations.

Plans for offshore wind farms are at an advanced stage with a number of potential fixed and floating operators examining sites along the coast from Dundalk in County Louth, to the Cork coast and beyond. Their construction will not only increase Ireland’s ability to produce renewable energy, it will also create an entire new sector dedicated to servicing their operation.

Pearse Flynn of Green Rebel Marine says, “Having come from a fishing community, I really appreciate the importance of the industry to livelihoods around the coast. The roll out of offshore wind will cross with the fishing industry at a number of points, and this new relationship with Fisheries Liaisons Ltd will mean that fishermen and their representatives organisations will be kept in the loop at all times. We aim to create a one-stop-shop between the fishing sector, their communities and the energy companies looking to place wind farms in Irish territorial waters. This new sector will create jobs and secure the future of our coastal communities.”

Fisheries Liaison Limited has three full-time staff, who will be based from the headquarters of Green Rebel Marine in Crosshaven, Co Cork. Since its creation, Fishery Liaisons has built a solid reputation conducting site specific risk analysis for a wide array of marine projects. In recent years, the company has evolved into the main stakeholder engagement partner for offshore wind project developers and the fishing community at large.

The team, all stemming from strong fishing heritage, apply decades of offshore and fishing liaison experience, to facilitate clear and transparent dialogue between the project developers and the fishing communities. Fishery Liaisons strive to develop good communication between the developers and the fishing communities, enabling them to co-exist throughout the project lifecycle. This collaboration with Green Rebel Marine will enable the team to continue to grow its expertise and expand its service offering well into the future.

Mark O’Reilly of Fisheries Liaisons Ltd says, “This is an opportunity for us to grow our team and provide a better service to the stakeholders concerned with this developing industry. We can now expand our presence on the ground and provide even more efficient support. Joining forces with Green Rebel Marine provides the platform we need to safeguard our fishing communities whilst enabling the development of offshore renewable energy towards a greener future for all. With energy companies now looking to place infrastructure at sea, we need to ensure that there is advance engagement at every turn, and that the fishing communities know they can rely on us to both listen and to convey their opinions in a timely and meaningful way.”

Published in Power From the Sea

 The British flagged Research/Survey Vessel Bibby Athena is a new visitor at Crosshaven Boatyard in Cork Harbour.

The catamaran is used for Seabed mapping and coastal survey work.

The 2014-built specialist ship has a length overall (LOA) of 27.5 metres and a width of 10.05 metres.

As part of its equipment, the Bibby Athena has onboard a d`ROP© survey ROV designed for shallow water survey and inspection, combining positioning from the DP vessel and a bespoke LARS system to maintain a fixed distance from the seabed.

Crosshaven Boatyard made the news last month when the extensive marine facility changed hands. 

Its new owner Pearse Flynn (see Afloat's report 28-09-20 here) has revealed further details of how the extensive facility in Cork Harbour will fit into his plans to provide comprehensive shoreside and on-water services for offshore wind farms off the Cork Coast, some as far as 70 miles at sea.

Published in Cork Harbour
Tagged under

Crosshaven Boatyard's new owner Pearse Flynn (see Afloat's report 28-09-20 here) has revealed further details of how the extensive facility in Cork Harbour will fit into his plans to provide comprehensive shoreside and on-water services for offshore wind farms off the Cork Coast, some as far as 70 miles at sea.

The yard, famed as the birthplace of Sir Francis Chichester's Gypsy Moth V in 1970, Tim Severin's ocean-voyaging "super-currach" St Brendan in 1977, and Denis Doyle's legendary offshore racer, the Frers 51 Moonduster, in 1981 - in addition to many other internationally-noted craft - is expected to be retaining many of its basic leisure boating services, while providing new work in the supply chain to the offshore wind industry.

Originally from Ballycotton in East Cork, Pearse Flynn (57) has had a remarkable international career, both as a senior executive in large corporations with a global reach, and as an entrepreneur. But according to an interview with Ian Guider in yesterday's Business Post, his heart has always remained in Ballycotton. And having one of his two homes there, he is keen to develop the vitality and economic clout of the small south coast ports, while retaining their strong sense of community.

Thus he feels that a highly-skilled locally-based workforce could be created by dynamic interaction with the growing wind energy industry. He reckons that if the ports such as Ballycotton and Crosshaven cannot provide the special combination of skills and service vessels, then his personal experience of working with the big international corporations involved leaves him in no doubt that they will readily import what they need from wherever it is easily available, depriving the small Irish ports of potentially significant sources of structural income and local employment.

 international entrepreneur Pearse Flynn in BallycottonBusy man back home – international entrepreneur Pearse Flynn in Ballycotton. Photo courtesy: Irish Examiner 

Thus he has invested €10 million in buying the boatyard – which comes with nine acres in a mix of workshops, covered storage and boat building facilities, in addition to extensive outdoor boat storage – and in ordering two special service vessels.

As to the actual wind farms, one line of approach which the team in his company Green Rebel Marine is researching is the possibility of turbines on floating platforms. But as of now, the village of Crosshaven is getting used to the idea that some truly cutting-edge sea-going technology may well be developed in a special place where traditional and modern boat-building have successfully inter-acted for many years.

Published in Crosshaven Boatyard

Irish businessman Pearse Flynn who made his fortune in the tech and telecoms has announced a €10m investment in a green energy project in Cork Harbour that aims to create 80 jobs within two years.

Flynn has acquired Crosshaven Boatyard as the headquarters of his new venture, Green Rebel Marine, to service the future needs of offshore windfarms.

The firm will use the nine-acre site as its base for surveying, equipping and servicing a network of planned wind farms along the Irish coast. The boatyard will continue its normal operations as a boatyard.

Mr Flynn, who is originally from East Cork and who owns and heads up UK debt solution company Creditfix, has also bought two specially equipped hi-tech ships for the new business.

The first vessel – the Bibby Athena, which will be renamed Roman Rebel - has already arrived in Cork. The second is scheduled to arrive later this year.

For further reading from the Irish Examiner here.

Published in Cork Harbour

After forty years of service, popular County Cork boatyard manager Matt Foley has retired from Crosshaven Boatyard.

Matt started work in the Cork Harbour yard on the 20th of August 1980. His first role was as a storeman at a very busy time with famous yachts such as the Frers 50, 'Moonduster' and 'Golden Apple' both in build at the yard.  Also back then – which many consider the yard's heyday – 40-foot trawlers were also built on-site, presenting an often hectic but happy scene for Matt and the Crosshaven team.

Over the years, Matt, who continues to play an active role as Treasurer in the Crosshaven RNLI Lifeboat since the stationed opened in 2000, was often multi-tasking and took on varied roles as the boatyard changed focus, including operating the Travel Hoist hauling and launching boats, all done in his usual affable and professional manner.

In March 2005, Matt was invited to take on the role of Boatyard Manager and Company Secretary which he did so reluctantly at first as it was his first managerial role. However, like everything else in the yard, Matt took to the new position quickly and soon earned the respect of both customers and staff alike.

In an overall context, Matt is credited with helping to turn the Boatyard into a profitable business. He also played a key role at the yard in supporting Cork Week Regatta at its height and more recently rebuilding the Boatyard's 120-berth Marina in 2014. 

Yacht broker Donal McClement who worked in association with the yard describes Matt as "firm but fair and always a pleasure to work with".  Matt's colleague Hugh Mockler, the yard's current broker, has been one of the first to wish Matt well into the future. "Everyone in Crosshaven Boatyard says it was a privilege to work with Matt and we wish him and his wife Jackie a very happy retirement".

Irish Marine Federation Chairman Paal Janson has also wished Matt "a happy retirement" and extends the "appreciation and good wishes of the Irish marine industry for his long service".

Published in Crosshaven Boatyard

Crosshaven Boatyard — the Irish agents for Rodman Boats — yesterday took the wrapping off a new Rodman Spirit 31 at their Cork Harbour yard and marina.

The hardtop inboard model comes with 320HP Volvo diesel engine, slightly different from the one that was shown with the Spanish brand’s latest range at boot Düsseldorf earlier this year.

For more details, contact Crosshaven Boatyard at 021 483 1161 or email [email protected]

Published in Crosshaven Boatyard
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Port of Cork Information

The Port of Cork is investing €80 million in a container terminal development in Ringaskiddy. The Cork Container Terminal will initially offer a 360-metre quay with 13-metre depth alongside and will enable larger ships to berth in the port. The development also includes the construction of a 13.5-hectare terminal and associated buildings as well as two ship to shore gantry cranes and container handling equipment.

The development of new container handling facilities at Ringaskiddy was identified in the Port of Cork’s Strategic Development Plan in 2010. It will accommodate current and future container shipping which can be serviced by modern and efficient cargo handling equipment with innovative terminal operating and vehicle booking systems. The Port of Cork anticipates that Cork Container Terminal will be operational in 2020.

The Port of Cork is the key seaport in the south of Ireland and is one of just two Irish ports which service the requirements of all shipping modes.

The Port of Cork also controls Bantry Bay Port Company and employs 150 people across all locations.

A European Designated Core Port and a Tier 1 Port of National Significance, Port of Cork’s reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround as well as the company’s investment in future growth, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain.

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades, most recently with the construction of the new €80m Cork Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy which will facilitate the natural progression of the move from a river port to a deepwater port in order to future proof the Port
of Cork. This state-of-the-art terminal which will open in 2020 will be capable of berthing the largest container ships currently calling to Ireland.

The Port of Cork Company is a commercial semi-state company responsible for the commercial running of the harbour as well as responsibility for navigation and berthage in the port.  The Port is the main port serving the South of Ireland, County Cork and Cork City. 

Types of Shipping Using Port of Cork

The Port offers all six shipping modes from Lift-on Lift-off, Roll-on Roll-off, Liquid Bulk, Dry Bulk, Break Bulk and Cruise liner traffic.

Port of Cork Growth

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades. Since 2000, the Port of Cork has invested €72 million in improving Port infrastructure and facilities. Due to its favourable location and its modern deepwater facilities, the Port is ideally positioned for additional European trading as well as for yet unexploited direct deep-sea shipping services. A well-developed road infrastructure eases the flow of traffic from and to the port. The Port of Cork’s growing reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain. The Port of Cork Company turnover in 2018 amounted to €35.4 million, an increase of €3.9 million from €31.5 million in 2017. The combined traffic of both the Ports of Cork and Bantry increased to 10.66 million tonnes in 2018 up from 10.3 million tonnes in 2017.

History of Port of Cork

Famous at the last port of call of the Titanic, these medieval navigation and port facilities of the city and harbour were historically managed by the Cork Harbour Commissioners. Founded in 1814, the Cork Harbour Commissioners moved to the Custom House in 1904.  Following the implementation of the 1996 Harbours Act, by March 1997 all assets of the Commissioners were transferred to the Port of Cork Company.

Commercial Traffic at Port of Cork

Vessels up to 90,000 tonnes deadweight (DWT) are capable of coming through entrance to Cork Harbour. As the shipping channels get shallower the farther inland one travels, access becomes constricted, and only vessels up to 60,000 DWT can sail above Cobh. The Port of Cork provides pilotage and towage facilities for vessels entering Cork Harbour. All vessels accessing the quays in Cork City must be piloted and all vessels exceeding 130 metres in length must be piloted once they pass within 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) of the harbour entrance.

Berthing Facilities in Cork Harbour

The Port of Cork has berthing facilities at Cork City, Tivoli, Cobh and Ringaskiddy. The facilities in Cork City are primarily used for grain and oil transport. Tivoli provides container handling, facilities for oil, livestock and ore and a roll on-roll off (Ro-Ro) ramp. Prior to the opening of Ringaskiddy Ferry Port, car ferries sailed from here; now, the Ro-Ro ramp is used by companies importing cars into Ireland. In addition to the ferry terminal, Ringaskiddy has a deep water port.

Port of Cork Development Plans

2020 will be a significant year for the Port of Cork as it prepares to complete and open the €86 million Cork Container Terminal development in Ringaskiddy.

Once operational the new terminal will enable the port to handle up to 450,000 TEU per annum. Port of Cork already possess significant natural depth in Cork harbour, and the work in Ringaskiddy Port will enable the Port of Cork to accommodate vessels of 5500 to 6000 TEU, which will provide a great deal of additional potential for increasing container traffic.

It follows a previous plan hatched in 2006 as the port operated at full capacity the Port drew up plans for a new container facility at Ringaskiddy. This was the subject of major objections and after an Oral Planning Hearing was held in 2008 the Irish planning board Bord Pleanala rejected the plan due to inadequate rail and road links at the location.  

Bantry Port

In 2017 Bantry Bay Port Company completed a significant investment of €8.5 million in the Bantry Inner Harbour development. The development consisted of a leisure marina, widening of the town pier, dredging of the inner harbour and creation of a foreshore amenity space.

Port of Cork Cruise Liner Traffic

2019 was a record cruise season for the Port of Cork with 100 cruise liners visiting. In total over 243,000 passengers and crew visited the region with many passengers visiting Cork for the first time.

Also in 2019, the Port of Cork's Cruise line berth in Cobh was recognised as one of the best cruise destinations in the world, winning in the Top-Rated British Isles & Western Europe Cruise Destination category. 

There has been an increase in cruise ship visits to Cork Harbour in the early 21st century, with 53 such ships visiting the port in 2011, increasing to approximately 100 cruise ship visits by 2019.

These cruise ships berth at the Port of Cork's deepwater quay in Cobh, which is Ireland's only dedicated berth for cruise ships.

Passenger Ferries

Operating since the late 1970s, Brittany Ferries runs a ferry service to Roscoff in France. This operates between April and November from the Ro-Ro facilities at Ringaskiddy. Previous ferry services ran to Swansea in Wales and Santander in Spain. The former, the Swansea Cork ferry, ran initially between 1987 and 2006 and also briefly between 2010 and 2012.

The latter, a Brittany Ferries Cork–Santander service, started in 2018 but was cancelled in early 2020.

Marine Leisure

The Port of Cork has a strategy that aims to promote the harbour also as a leisure amenity. Cork’s superb natural harbour is a great place to enjoy all types of marine leisure pursuits. With lots of sailing and rowing clubs dotted throughout the harbour, excellent fishing and picturesque harbour-side paths for walking, running or cycling, there is something for everyone to enjoy in and around Cork harbour. The Port is actively involved with the promotion of Cork Harbour's annual Festival. The oldest sailing club in the world, founded in 1720, is the Royal Cork Yacht Club is located at Crosshaven in the harbour, proof positive, says the Port, that the people of Cork, and its visitors, have been enjoying this vast natural leisure resource for centuries. 

Port of Cork Executives

  • Chairman: John Mullins
  • Chief Executive: Brendan Keating
  • Secretary/Chief Finance Officer: Donal Crowley
  • Harbour Master and Chief Operations Officer: Capt. Paul O'Regan
  • Port Engineering Manager: Henry Kingston
  • Chief Commercial Officer: Conor Mowlds
  • Head of Human Resources: Peter O'Shaughnessy
Who is Your Sailor of the Year 2020?
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At A Glance – Port of Cork

Type of port: deepwater, multi-model, Panamax, warm-water
Available berths: Up to ten
Wharves: 1
Employees: 113
Chief Executive: Brendan Keating
Annual cargo tonnage: 9,050,000
Annual container volume: 165,000

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