Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Rib

Investigations are underway at Dun Laoghaire Harbour to determine how and why an unmanned pleasure craft went 'out of control' on Thursday evening (May 16th) and damaged neighbouring boats in the inner Coal Harbour area.

Social media footage captured the scene on an otherwise idyllic night in the south Dublin harbour as a 7-metre Rigid Inflatable Boat (RIB) spun out of control on its mooring and careered into moored boats, including those of a harbour sailing school.

An eyewitness said, "Two people were thrown from the boat while putting it on the mooring. They accidentally hit the throttle, and both were thrown from the rib. The boat continued to go around in circles until it eventually broke the mooring and ended up crashing." 

A local source said, "Luckily, nobody was killed or maimed". 

Another told Afloat: "There was damage when the RIB mounted a nearby pontoon where sailing school boats and equipment are stored".

Tagged under

In a first for the Irish marine industry, MarineServices.ie is proud to present the first all-electric powered rigid inflatable boat (RIB). Arriving in early February, RS Electric Boats’ Pulse 63 is a 6.3-metre-long RIB designed from the ground up to be 100% electric.

After a design, development, and testing period of over three years, this craft is now entering mass production. It's set to be a real game-changer in the marine industry. MarineServices aims to revolutionise both the commercial and leisure RIB markets with this groundbreaking boat.

Pulse 63 is a 6.3-metre-long RIBPulse 63 is a 6.3-metre-long RIB

The Pulse 63 is no longer a prototype; it delivers real-world performance and range with its high-performance electric setup. Expect a range of up to 100 nautical miles and top speeds of over 20 knots. Similar to electric cars, the power is instantaneous, providing swift acceleration and unrivalled manoeuvrability.

"Pulse 63 is a 6.3-metre-long RIB designed from the ground up to be 100% electric"

Constructed with shock-absorbing materials and designed for excellent stability, the Pulse 63 ensures a smooth ride. Its unique hull form creates an air cushion effect, resulting in a drier cockpit even when the seas get rough. Without the need for engine mounts, the cockpit is very spacious for its size, and the engine is virtually silent.

Pulse 63Pulse 63 - Expect a range of up to 100 nautical miles and top speeds of over 20 knots

Sustainability is key in the construction of the Pulse 63. RS Electric Boats have undertaken extensive research into the applications of alternative materials, and, building upon their successes in RS Sailing’s production, have developed an optimised laminate for the Pulse 63, which includes a PET core made from recycled post-consumer plastics. This innovative material is lightweight, durable, and incredibly strong.

Designed as an electric RIB from the outset, the Pulse 63 features some of the most advanced electric propulsion technologyDesigned as an electric RIB from the outset, the Pulse 63 features some of the most advanced electric propulsion technology

Designed as an electric RIB from the outset, the Pulse 63 features some of the most advanced electric propulsion technology. The Electric Drive offers instant acceleration, featherlight control, and hydrodynamic performance. It also means less noise, reduced vibration, lighter weight, and lower maintenance.

This unique boat will be in Ireland from the 9th-12th of February. The RS Electric Boats and MarineServices.ie team would be delighted to demonstrate this masterpiece to both commercial and private users.

To book your timeslot and experience the future of marine travel, please email [email protected]

Published in INSS

Dublin City Centre looks magical at night!

The INSS.ie RIB Rides and Winter Lights has had a cracking first weekend exploring the river Liffey and Christmas lights.

Over 40 participants of all ages joined the crew on passage from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to Dublin Port and past O’Connell Bridge before returning to the harbour.

The programme is running as part of the Irish National Sailing & Powerboat School's contribution to the Failte Ireland Winter In Dublin campaign.

INSS RIB Trip passing Sir John Rogerson's Quay on Dublin's River LiffeyINSS RIB Trip passing Sir John Rogerson's Quay on Dublin's River Liffey

Crews witnessed the operations of the busy Dublin Port in the twilight, including car transporters, ferries and bulk transporters all at work.

After heading under the East Link Bridge, the vista of Silicon Docks comes into view – this part of the city has really transformed over the last ten years, and the view is unforgettable.

Dublin City Council have gone to great lengths to have an excellent lights display on the Samuel Beckett Bridge.

The Samuel Beckett Bridge as seen from an INSS RIBThe Samuel Beckett Bridge as seen from an INSS RIB

One participant remarked that the Christmas lights seem to have been set up with the best view from the river itself – and it certainly looks so, the highlight being the fantastic lights display on the Customs house.

CUSTOM HOUSE VIDEO

Keen to make the trip all that more memorable, the crews stopped each day upriver of O’Connell Bridge for a hot chocolate pit stop.

The trips are running over the next two weekends – Saturday and Sunday afternoons from 3-6 pm and there are still a few places remaining onboard.

All are very welcome.

Full details and booking is available here

Published in INSS
Tagged under

The Lough Corrib RIB Run is set to take place this weekend, organised by Powerboat West's Aaron O'Reilly of County Galway.

This year’s RIB cruise is jointly presented by ‘PowerBoats in the West’ and ‘Corrib Rowing and Yachting Club’ in aid of RNLI Galway.

The day will kick off from Galway's Corrib and Yachting Club, to cover 70 nautical miles.

Participants will set off on a 10 am start on Saturday morning with the following schedule.

  • Access to CRYC slipway from 7 am for launching
  • Drivers briefing at 9.30 am at CRYC Clubhouse.
  • Departing CRYC at 10 am Sharp!
  • Arriving Inchogill c. 11.30 am.
  • Pack a picnic and take a walk around the island - guided historic tours provided by Niall O’Flaherty.
  • Depart Inchogill 1pm.
  • Arrive Maam bridge 2.30 pm.
  • Refreshments and sandwiches are available at Keane’s pub.
  • Depart Maam at 4.00 pm.
  • Return to Galway City via Ashford Castle.
  • Arrive CRYC at 6.00 pm.

More details here

Published in RIBs
Tagged under

Leinster Boats offers a Redbay Stormforce 7.4m RIB for sale.

The 'complete package' includes a 250 hp Suzuki outboard engine, a Rollercoaster trailer, and full instrumentation.

As regular Afloat readers know, this RIB range is Irish-built in the Glens of Antrim at Cushendall under master builder Tom McLoughlin and his team. The range is well known for its sea-keeping abilities.

Yacht Broker Ronan Beirne of Leinster Boats says this example is an 'all weather' RIB that is well cared for and recently serviced.

"The Redbay 7.4 is a true open sea adventure rib with many having circumnavigated Ireland," he says.

"This rib is meticulously maintained by a caring owner, with everything in full service. The perfect family rib is available now and ready to go", he adds.

See the full advert here

Published in RIBs
Tagged under

The Kenmare River where Kerry verges into Cork is one of Ireland’s cruising gems – it’s pure gold and then some. But we weren’t exactly cruising when the Nixon Tribe descended on the area precisely a year ago for a significant anniversary. The anniversary had been delayed because of the lockdown restrictions, and so the Tribe were in the mode of a genie let out of a bottle. Rather a lot of bottles, as it happens. But our host John Brennan, hotelier of that parish, was so tolerant of this invasion of the barbarians that he took us all out for the afternoon in his pride-and-joy, his then-new Redbay Stormforce 1450 super-rib Dromquinna, with a real red-carpet champagne and super-nibbles treatment in a secluded anchorage in Kilmakilloge for the anniversarians and their associated brood.

We don’t get together that often in significant numbers for various good reasons, including the fact that when the next generation are on their own with each other in more compact groups, it can be fairly civilized, but when the parents are introduced into the total equation, that old demon of sibling rivalry is always bubbling under the surface.

John Brennan in his happy place – aboard the boat and headed somewhere interesting. Photo: W M NixonJohn Brennan in his happy place – aboard the boat and headed somewhere interesting. Photo: W M Nixon

Thus if we were together this weekend, I reckon that the annual review of combined family fleet activities since that special gathering in Kenmare would include two dismastings. This in turn brings the revelation that the Seventeen Footers in Howth are rather better organized as a class in coming up with an immediate mast replacement than are the Devon Yawls at Bosham on Chichester Harbour. The Howth 17s can have you up and sailing again within a day, whereas the new mast for the Devon Yawl takes six weeks. And that is precisely the kind of thing that makes for a good row in a sailing family

Yet despite those various spars coming down around people’s ears, sailing trophies have been won for both family fortresses through 2022. Perhaps the most notable is the annual Bognor Bogbrush, in which the grandson Magnus skippered the winning under-9 team racing Opties for Chichester Harbour at Bognor Regis. The young sailor is named after the first and last Viking Saint. You can visit St Magnus’ cathedral at Kirkwall if cruising the Orkneys, but his mission to deter Vikings from violence was only successful after his aggressive people martyred him, which gives his name a special sanctity.

Thus in the family home of thatched Quay Cottage in Bosham, the Bognor Bogbrush is referred to as “the special trophy”, for they share the quay with the still active though very ancient church which was founded by King Canute’s wife, and with this double sanctity the successful young team captain’s mother cannot allow it to be publicly known that her lovely son is the current holder of the Bognor Bogbrush.

Kitted out for serious sailing – Magnus Nixon, the winning team captain in the U9s in the annual Bognor Bogbrush championship. Photo: Brian NixonKitted out for serious sailing – Magnus Nixon, the winning team captain in the U9s in the annual Bognor Bogbrush championship. Photo: Brian Nixon 

Be that as it may, having seen how calmly and thoughtfully John Brennan dealt with our mob of Viking successors, we’ve taken a special interest in his doings with the Stormforce 1450, for he and his son Adam – a naval architect in the making – made a significant input into the design. And as well, since we were with him his book about how he turned the problem of severe dyslexia into an opportunity and encouragement – it’s called My Name Is Jhon and is one of the best reads I’ve had during the past year – has been published to deserved acclaim.

It turns out that he and his wife Gwen have been very successful in combining business with pleasure. John is a hotelier to his finger-tips, totally engrossed 24/7 in his job when he’s on duty. So how does a guy like this take a holiday? Does he saunter off to some distant specialist Seven Star-plus-plus hotel and allow others to cater for a while for his every need?

The ports in South Brittany visited by Dromquinna in June.The ports in South Brittany visited by Dromquinna in June.

Not so, it seems. During June, thanks to his skills in delegation and his ability to rely on the many talents of his famous brother Francis to keep an eye on their three hotels, John and Gwen headed off for Brittany in the Dromquinna in the hope of a few days relaxation, but also with plans to meet up with others who are putting together the Adventure Nautique Atlantique Sauvage.

Some time ago before Brexit, the Cool Route cruising concept from Cork Harbour eventually to Norway was being developed, but this enlargement acknowledges the ancient sea routes between Ireland, Brittany and Iberia (think Song of Amergin, where the main man departs from A Coruna in northwest Spain), yet also deals with post-Brexit reality by utilising British-flagged Gibraltar – which has a special relation with the EU – as a start point.

National and regional flags aloft to celebrate the Adventure Nautique Atlantic Sauvage meeting at Port Haliguen in Quiberon. Photo: John BrennanNational and regional flags aloft to celebrate the Adventure Nautique Atlantic Sauvage meeting at Port Haliguen in Quiberon. Photo: John Brennan

At Port Haliguen - when you’re proposing a cruise route along Europe’s Atlantic seaboard, it’s a good idea to have the rescue services on side from the start…….Photo: John BrennanAt Port Haliguen - when you’re proposing a cruise route along Europe’s Atlantic seaboard, it’s a good idea to have the rescue services on side from the start…….Photo: John Brennan

Thus thanks to the presence of John & Gwen with Dromquinna at a meeting in Port Haliguen, the Irish tricolour was flying with the array from other nations exploring the possibilities of this nautical Wild Atlantic Way. And by that time they’d discovered that this style of cruising was suiting them very well indeed. For the fact is that Gwen had mixed feelings about boat life beforehand, yet it emerges that this dyed-in-the-wool hospitality couple spent every single night in board while in Brittany.

This is home for now - settling in for the night at Camaret after a seven hour passage from the Isles of Scilly, with the yellow Q flag flying for the customs. Photo: John BrennanThis is home for now - settling in for the night at Camaret after a seven hour passage from the Isles of Scilly, with the yellow Q flag flying for the customs. Photo: John Brennan

Of course they went ashore for knowledgeable enjoyment of local cuisine. And like all boaties, they spent time around harbours large (sometimes very large) and small, talking boat talk. But their expectation that every so often they’d book into a good hotel for two or three nights simply didn’t happen.

Usually with just the two of them, there was space to spare, they knew how everything worked and being John, everything did work. They were having a ball. Seeing ports as entertaining places to visit, and knowing that they had all the comforts of their familiar home-from-home within walking distance, proved to be totally relaxing – they were so well organised on board that they didn’t even have a shower off the boat.

Perfect cruising evening in Brittany – yet though John & Gwen Brennan might have an interesting meal ashore, they returned to the familiar comfort of the boat every night. Photo: John BrennanPerfect cruising evening in Brittany – yet though John & Gwen Brennan might have an interesting meal ashore, they returned to the familiar comfort of the boat every night. Photo: John Brennan 

For there’s no doubting that John is in his happy place when he’s aboard Dromquinna. But being the man he is, lolling about is not an option, and a year ago we had the experience of being at better than 35 knots with him in the Kenmare River, which shows the kind of performance he can call on for short periods, while a solid cruising speed means that no passages are required at night – on the outward voyage, they did Cork to the Isles of Scilly in five hours.

Dromquinna’s speed potential – even with a party on board – is shown top left in knots on the Kenmare River September 2021. A cruising speed of 23 knots is much more economical, but it’s good to have this performance in reserve. Photo: W M NixonDromquinna’s speed potential – even with a party on board – is shown top left in knots on the Kenmare River September 2021. A cruising speed of 23 knots is much more economical, but it’s good to have this performance in reserve. Photo: W M Nixon

In fact, while Brittany was marvellous in its variety and unique pace of life while being confident in its own identity, it was the freedom of being able to visit the Isles of Scilly in their own boat which was one of the cruise highlights. So much so, that they lingered longer than expected while heading south, and took a chunk out of the homeward passage for a further stay among those enchanted islands.

Dawn departure from France – to ensure there were no night passages, early starts for the longer legs were always useful. Photo: John BrennanDawn departure from France – to ensure there were no night passages, early starts for the longer legs were always useful. Photo: John Brennan

The need to anchor and use the outboard tender in Scillonia rather than having access to a marina berth was seen as an added attraction rather than an irksome chore, for most RIB owners are new to the experience of a cruising boat comfortably lying for a few peaceful days to her own anchor.

Well worth the effort…..heading ashore for dinner at Tresco in the Isle of Scilly, while Dromquinna lies sweetly to anchor in New Grimsby Sound. Photo: Gwen BrennanWell worth the effort…..heading ashore for dinner at Tresco in the Isle of Scilly, while Dromquinna lies sweetly to anchor in New Grimsby Sound. Photo: Gwen Brennan

That said, in big marinas you can sometimes find yourself berthed conveniently near to boats of special interest. It takes some doing in the general drone image of Port Haliguen to find Dromquinna, but when you do, it’s to discover that she’s berthed just across the pontoon from the veteran Dick Newick trimaran that may be the former Downtown Flyer, built by Brian Law and Dickie Gomes of Strangford Lough at Lisburn in 1982, and a mighty racer in her day forty years ago.

Contrasting styles. In Port Haliguen, Dromquinna is berthed next to a vintage Newick trimaran which may well be the 1982 Downtown Flyer. Photo: John BrennanContrasting styles. In Port Haliguen, Dromquinna is berthed next to a vintage Newick trimaran which may well be the 1982 Downtown Flyer. Photo: John Brennan

And there is of course an extraordinary story about what happened when Downtown Flyer first made her home in France after “Lawsie and Gomesie” had done everything they wished with her on the international racing circuit, and thought they’d sold her. But we may need advice from m’learned friends before recounting it………

Published in W M Nixon
Tagged under

Chaos outside Paris’ Stade de France at the Champions League final is leading this morning’s headlines — and among the fans in the city were a group of resourceful Liverpool supporters who travelled part of the way by speedboat.

As the Liverpool ECHO reports, Paddy O’Toole said friends’ original travel plans appeared to have been scuppered by the cancellation of their EasyJet flight to Paris for the crunch football final.

After dashing from Liverpool to London, the group managed to get on a flight from Heathrow to Jersey in the Channel Islands, where Paddy lives, but that still left them hundreds more kilometres short of the French capital.

Enter Paddy’s friend Garry Brennan, whose local business has a fleet of motor vessels including the 12-person RIB that carried the intrepid group to the French mainland on Friday (27 May) in plenty of time to join thousands of other Liverpool away fans.

The Liverpool ECHO has more on the story HERE.

Published in RIBs
Tagged under

The 'mystery' to local observers of just who was behind the impressive 15-boat strong RIB raid fleet powering across Dublin Bay last Sunday morning was answered this week on social media when it emerged the boats, ranging from 5 to 8 metres in length, were freshwater visitors from the Inland Waterways Association of Ireland (IWAI) Powerboat Branch.

The River Shannon ribbers, which included three jet skis, took in a River Liffey spin via Grand Canal Dock in the city centre as well as heading out into the Bay to Dun Laoghaire Harbour, followed by a 12km run in some bumpy southerly conditions down to Greystones Harbour in County Wicklow.

"We waited so long to do our first RIB run with the IWAI Powerboat Branch, and it was FANTASTIC! After seeing Dun Laoghaire, Greystones and Dublin city from these new perspectives, I wouldn't wish to live anywhere else but beautiful Éire", said one of the RIB crews online.

Published in RIBs
Tagged under

Dublin Bay-based yacht broker Ronan Beirne of Leinster Boats is listing a Redbay Stormforce 7.4S RIB on his current boats for sale brokerage listings.

Described by Beirne as 'the perfect family rib', the open sea adventure vessel is available now and priced at €53,000.

The all-weather rib comes as a complete package with a Suzuki DF 250, Rollercoaster trailer, full instrumentation.

The boat is very well cared for and recently serviced.  "This rib is meticulously maintained with everything in full service," Beirne says. 

"Hesitate and you will be ashore this Summer, " Beirne adds. 

See the full advert on Afloat here.

Published in Boat Sales
Tagged under

Captain Sergio Davì, the Italian seafarer who first made headlines when he travelled from Palermo, Italy to New York in 2019 (via Ireland) in his 11-metre (36-foot) rigid inflatable boat (RIB), is ready for his next adventure across three continents, two oceans and covering over 10,000 nautical miles.

Davì is expected to depart in the next best weather window for his solo trip from Palermo to Los Angeles, crossing the Atlantic, passing through the Panama Canal and heading north along Mexico and California’s coast in his Nuova Jolly RIB before arriving in Los Angeles in late February.

Captain Sergio Davì in his ocean crossing RIBCaptain Sergio Davì in his ocean crossing RIB

Davì has named the bid the OCEAN TO OCEAN RIB ADVENTURE and his voyage will be dedicated to issues around ocean health. During the crossing, he will collect seawater samples to assess the presence of microplastics and carry out the analysis of metal traces, focusing in particular on under-researched or specific geographical points of reference.

For this trip, Davì has partnered with the Experimental Zooprophylactic Institutes of Piedmont, Liguria & Valle d'Aosta and Sicily to examine the dangers of ocean pollution on human health.

“They are giving me the opportunity to make my trip and experience of study and research as well as a warning for the protection of our seas and oceans,” said Davi.

OCEAN TO OCEAN RIB ADVENTURE RouteOCEAN TO OCEAN RIB ADVENTURE Route

OCEAN TO OCEAN RIB ADVENTURE – SCHEDULE (Expected Departures)

  • Leg 1 PALERMO-MALLORCA (LATE NOVEMBER)
  • Leg 2 MALLORCA-GIBRALTAR
  • Leg 3 GIBRALTAR-LANZAROTE
  • Leg 4 LANZAROTE-GRAN CANARIA
  • Leg 5 GRAN CANARIA-MINDELO
  • Leg 6 MINDELO-KOUROU
  • Leg 7 KOUROU-PORT OF SPAIN
  • Leg 8 PORT OF SPAIN-CURACAO
  • Leg 9 CURACAO-SANTA MARTA
  • Leg 10 SANTA MARTA-CARTAGENA
  • Leg 11 CARTAGENA-FUERTE SHERMAN
  • Leg 12 FUERTE SHERMAN-SAN CARLOS
  • Leg 13 SAN CARLOS-BOCA BRAVA
  • Leg 14 BOCA BRAVA-PUERTO QUETZAL
  • Leg 15 PUERTO QUETZAL-PUERTO DE SAN BENITO
  • Leg 16 PUERTO DE SAN BENITO-ACAPULCO
  • Leg 17 ACAPULCO-IXTAPA
  • Leg 18 IXTAPA-MANZANILLO
  • Leg 19 MANZANILLO-CABO SAN LUCAS
  • Leg 20 CABO SAN LUCAS-ISLA CEDROS
  • Leg 21 ISLA CEDROS-ENSENADA
  • Leg 22 ENSENADA-SAN DIEGO
  • Leg 23 SAN DIEGO-LOS ANGELES LATE FEBRUARY
Published in RIBs
Tagged under
Page 1 of 10

Port of Cork Information

The Port of Cork is the key seaport in the south of Ireland and is one of only two Irish ports which service the requirements of all six shipping modes i.e., Lift-on Lift-off, Roll-on Roll-off, Liquid Bulk, Dry Bulk, Break Bulk and Cruise. Due to its favourable location on the south coast of Ireland and its modern deep-water facilities, the Port of Cork is ideally positioned for additional European trading as well as for yet unexploited direct deep-sea shipping services.

The Port of Cork is investing €80 million in a container terminal development in Ringaskiddy. The Cork Container Terminal will initially offer a 360-metre quay with 13-metre depth alongside and will enable larger ships to berth in the port. The development also includes the construction of a 13.5-hectare terminal and associated buildings as well as two ship to shore gantry cranes and container handling equipment.

The development of new container handling facilities at Ringaskiddy was identified in the Port of Cork’s Strategic Development Plan in 2010. It will accommodate current and future container shipping which can be serviced by modern and efficient cargo handling equipment with innovative terminal operating and vehicle booking systems. The Port of Cork anticipates that Cork Container Terminal will be operational in 2020.

The Port of Cork is the key seaport in the south of Ireland and is one of just two Irish ports which service the requirements of all shipping modes.

The Port of Cork also controls Bantry Bay Port Company and employs 150 people across all locations.

A European Designated Core Port and a Tier 1 Port of National Significance, Port of Cork’s reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround as well as the company’s investment in future growth, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain.

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades, most recently with the construction of the new €80m Cork Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy which will facilitate the natural progression of the move from a river port to a deepwater port in order to future proof the Port
of Cork. This state-of-the-art terminal which will open in 2020 will be capable of berthing the largest container ships currently calling to Ireland.

The Port of Cork Company is a commercial semi-state company responsible for the commercial running of the harbour as well as responsibility for navigation and berthage in the port.  The Port is the main port serving the South of Ireland, County Cork and Cork City. 

Types of Shipping Using Port of Cork

The Port offers all six shipping modes from Lift-on Lift-off, Roll-on Roll-off, Liquid Bulk, Dry Bulk, Break Bulk and Cruise liner traffic.

Port of Cork Growth

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades. Since 2000, the Port of Cork has invested €72 million in improving Port infrastructure and facilities. Due to its favourable location and its modern deepwater facilities, the Port is ideally positioned for additional European trading as well as for yet unexploited direct deep-sea shipping services. A well-developed road infrastructure eases the flow of traffic from and to the port. The Port of Cork’s growing reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain. The Port of Cork Company turnover in 2018 amounted to €35.4 million, an increase of €3.9 million from €31.5 million in 2017. The combined traffic of both the Ports of Cork and Bantry increased to 10.66 million tonnes in 2018 up from 10.3 million tonnes in 2017.

History of Port of Cork

Famous at the last port of call of the Titanic, these medieval navigation and port facilities of the city and harbour were historically managed by the Cork Harbour Commissioners. Founded in 1814, the Cork Harbour Commissioners moved to the Custom House in 1904.  Following the implementation of the 1996 Harbours Act, by March 1997 all assets of the Commissioners were transferred to the Port of Cork Company.

Commercial Traffic at Port of Cork

Vessels up to 90,000 tonnes deadweight (DWT) are capable of coming through entrance to Cork Harbour. As the shipping channels get shallower the farther inland one travels, access becomes constricted, and only vessels up to 60,000 DWT can sail above Cobh. The Port of Cork provides pilotage and towage facilities for vessels entering Cork Harbour. All vessels accessing the quays in Cork City must be piloted and all vessels exceeding 130 metres in length must be piloted once they pass within 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) of the harbour entrance.

Berthing Facilities in Cork Harbour

The Port of Cork has berthing facilities at Cork City, Tivoli, Cobh and Ringaskiddy. The facilities in Cork City are primarily used for grain and oil transport. Tivoli provides container handling, facilities for oil, livestock and ore and a roll on-roll off (Ro-Ro) ramp. Prior to the opening of Ringaskiddy Ferry Port, car ferries sailed from here; now, the Ro-Ro ramp is used by companies importing cars into Ireland. In addition to the ferry terminal, Ringaskiddy has a deep water port.

Port of Cork Development Plans

2020 will be a significant year for the Port of Cork as it prepares to complete and open the €86 million Cork Container Terminal development in Ringaskiddy.

Once operational the new terminal will enable the port to handle up to 450,000 TEU per annum. Port of Cork already possess significant natural depth in Cork harbour, and the work in Ringaskiddy Port will enable the Port of Cork to accommodate vessels of 5500 to 6000 TEU, which will provide a great deal of additional potential for increasing container traffic.

It follows a previous plan hatched in 2006 as the port operated at full capacity the Port drew up plans for a new container facility at Ringaskiddy. This was the subject of major objections and after an Oral Planning Hearing was held in 2008 the Irish planning board Bord Pleanala rejected the plan due to inadequate rail and road links at the location.  

Further notable sustainability projects also include:

  • The Port of Cork have invested in 2 x STS cranes – Type single lift, Model P (148) L, (WS) Super. These cranes contain the most modern and energy-efficient control and monitoring systems currently available on the market and include an LED floodlight system equipped with software to facilitate remote diagnostics, a Crane Management System (CMS) and an energy chain supply on both cranes replacing the previous preferred festoon cabling installation.
  • The Port of Cork has installed High Mast Lighting Voltage Control Units at its two main cargo handling locations – Tivoli Industrial & Dock Estate and Ringaskiddy Deep-water & Ferry Terminals. This investment has led to more efficient energy use and reduced risk of light pollution. The lights can also be controlled remotely.
  • The Port of Cork’s largest electrical consumer at Tivoli Container Terminal is the handling and storage of refrigerated containers. Local data loggers were used to assess energy consumption. This provided timely intervention regarding Power Factor Correction Bank efficiency on our STS (Ship to Shore) Cranes and Substations, allowing for reduced mains demand and reducing wattless energy losses along with excess charges. The information gathered has helped us to design and build a reefer storage facility with energy management and remote monitoring included.

Bantry Port

In 2017 Bantry Bay Port Company completed a significant investment of €8.5 million in the Bantry Inner Harbour development. The development consisted of a leisure marina, widening of the town pier, dredging of the inner harbour and creation of a foreshore amenity space.

Port of Cork Cruise Liner Traffic

2019 was a record cruise season for the Port of Cork with 100 cruise liners visiting. In total over 243,000 passengers and crew visited the region with many passengers visiting Cork for the first time.

Also in 2019, the Port of Cork's Cruise line berth in Cobh was recognised as one of the best cruise destinations in the world, winning in the Top-Rated British Isles & Western Europe Cruise Destination category. 

There has been an increase in cruise ship visits to Cork Harbour in the early 21st century, with 53 such ships visiting the port in 2011, increasing to approximately 100 cruise ship visits by 2019.

These cruise ships berth at the Port of Cork's deepwater quay in Cobh, which is Ireland's only dedicated berth for cruise ships.

Passenger Ferries

Operating since the late 1970s, Brittany Ferries runs a ferry service to Roscoff in France. This operates between April and November from the Ro-Ro facilities at Ringaskiddy. Previous ferry services ran to Swansea in Wales and Santander in Spain. The former, the Swansea Cork ferry, ran initially between 1987 and 2006 and also briefly between 2010 and 2012.

The latter, a Brittany Ferries Cork–Santander service, started in 2018 but was cancelled in early 2020.

Marine Leisure

The Port of Cork has a strategy that aims to promote the harbour also as a leisure amenity. Cork’s superb natural harbour is a great place to enjoy all types of marine leisure pursuits. With lots of sailing and rowing clubs dotted throughout the harbour, excellent fishing and picturesque harbour-side paths for walking, running or cycling, there is something for everyone to enjoy in and around Cork harbour. The Port is actively involved with the promotion of Cork Harbour's annual Festival. The oldest sailing club in the world, founded in 1720, is the Royal Cork Yacht Club is located at Crosshaven in the harbour, proof positive, says the Port, that the people of Cork, and its visitors, have been enjoying this vast natural leisure resource for centuries. 

Port of Cork Executives

  • Chairman: John Mullins
  • Chief Executive: Brendan Keating
  • Secretary/Chief Finance Officer: Donal Crowley
  • Harbour Master and Chief Operations Officer: Capt. Paul O'Regan
  • Port Engineering Manager: Henry Kingston
  • Chief Commercial Officer: Conor Mowlds
  • Head of Human Resources: Peter O'Shaughnessy