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Displaying items by tag: marine wildlife

Extinction threatens 48 species living in the Irish marine environment, including fish, crustaceans, shellfish and invertebrates, according to the new National Biodiversity Action Plan.

“It is imperative that we arrest these declines and start the process of regeneration,” the authors of the action plan state.

The fourth national biodiversity action plan was published yesterday by Minister for Heritage Malcolm Noonan.

The new plan has been placed on a statutory footing for the first time, and it also commits to enacting and implementing comprehensive legislation on marine protected areas.

The plan notes that in Ireland, almost a third of EU-protected species and 85% of EU-protected habitats are in unfavourable status.

It says that over half of native Irish plant species have declined in the last 20 years, and 30% of semi-natural grasslands have been lost in the past 10 years.

Over 20% of breeding and 52% of key wintering bird species are reported to have short-term declining trends, it says.

Many of the issues it identifies were addressed in the report by the Citizens’ Assembly on Biodiversity Loss.

The new biodiversity action plan seeks to address a number of its key recommendations.

Its 194 actions across sea and land include commitments to deliver on obligations to conserve the most precious habitats and species, and “strategically target” efforts on invasive species.

The Fair Seas coalition of environmental groups welcomed its publication, but warned that it will only work if “every single measure is acted upon promptly”.

Published in Marine Wildlife

The seas off Wexford have been designated as a proposed new special protection area (SPA) for birds by Minister of State for Heritage Malcolm Noonan.

The new SPA adjoins eight existing SPAs designated for this area and will cover over 305,000 hectares of marine waters for a range of bird species throughout the year.

The area under the EU Birds Directive surpasses the north-west Irish Sea SPA designated for seabirds last year, Noonan said.

The Wexford designation increases the percentage of Ireland’s protected marine waters to just under the 10% for Natura designations promised by the minister under the EU Biodiversity Strategy.

Gannetts on the Saltee Islands Photo: Vincent BradleyGannetts on the Saltee Islands Photo: Vincent Bradley

It also makes that 10% milestone “realistically achievable within the current year”, he says.

“At 305,000 hectares, the seas off Wexford SPA is bigger than Co Wexford itself and the largest ever area to be protected for birds in the history of the State,” Noonan said.

“ I’m delighted to be able to announce this significant step forward for nature, and particularly for marine seabirds. This Government is working hard to ensure robust biodiversity protections, just as we are working hard to deliver on our offshore renewable energy objectives,” he said.

“ Biodiversity action and climate action must go hand in hand, and we must continue to work together to protect nature while delivering a swift transition to more sustainable and renewable forms of energy,” he said.

National Parks and Wildlife Service director general Niall Ó Donnchú said the designation represented “another determined step by Ireland to protect our marine birdlife”.

“The 20 species protected at this site are some of our rarest and most threatened birds, and these waters are a valuable feeding resource for the seabirds that return every spring to Wexford’s coastal and island colonies to breed,” he said.

“ Outside of the summer months, these relatively shallow coastal waters provide safe feeding and roosting opportunities for a range of marine birds overwintering here or on passage,” he said.

The marine waters off the coast of Co Wexford mark the boundary between the Irish and Celtic Seas, and the new SPA extends offshore along most of the county’s coast.

More detailed information about the site, including a map, a species list and a list of the activities requiring consent (ARCs) for the site, is available at www.npws.ie/protectedsites.

Objections or observations, which may only be based on scientific or ornithological grounds, can be submitted to the email address [email protected].

Bird species covered by the proposed SPA designation are: the Common Scoter, Red-throated Diver, Fulmar, Manx Shearwater, Gannet, Shag, Cormorant, Kittiwake, Black-headed Gull, Lesser Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, Little Tern, Roseate Tern, Common Tern, Arctic Tern, Sandwich Tern, Mediterranean Gull, Puffin, Razorbill and Guillemot.

Razorbills on the Saltee Islands Wexford Photo: Vincent BradleyRazorbills on the Saltee Islands Wexford Photo: Vincent Bradley

Four of the existing SPAs in this area are designated for breeding seabirds, namely Lady’s Island Lake SPA, Wexford Harbour and Slobs SPA, Keeragh Islands SPA and Saltee Islands SPA.

The Fair Seas coalition of environmental organisations said the proposed SPA should be a cause for celebration, but said that” a lack of proper community engagement, no coinciding management plans and no sign of the promised Marine Protected Area (MPA) bill is risking public trust in the process”.

Fair Seas said that “although the news is welcome, proper consultation with local fishers, industry, communities and other stakeholders is vital to ensure its success”.

The group is campaigning for “strong and ambitious MPA legislation to be introduced as a matter of priority”.

Published in Marine Wildlife

Over three-quarters of seabird species breeding in Ireland have increased, with only two species declining, according to a census just published.

The “Seabirds Count” census shows that Ireland is particularly important for species such as Roseate Tern and European Storm-petrel as 94% and 73% of the total populations breed here.

Roseate Tern, European Storm-petrel and Razorbill are some of the 17 species which have increased over the last 20 years, it says while the Kittiwake and Puffin are in decline.

It says that increasing populations of some seabird species are linked to effective conservation management measures, such as tern-wardening projects.

Seabirds Count, which has been released as a book by wildlife publishers Lynx Edicions, is said to be the most comprehensive seabird census produced to date.

It provides population estimates for the 25 regularly breeding species of Britain, Ireland, Isle of Man and the Channel Islands.

The survey took place between 2015 and 2021 and was led by the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (UK) with over 20 steering group partners.

BirdWatch Ireland and the National Parks and Wildlife Service were the key partners in Ireland.

It has found that seabirds are “doing well in Ireland with 17 species increasing and only two declining”.

“A similar pattern prevails in Northern Ireland, with four species declining and nine increasing,”it says.

“ This is in contrast to census results across the entire UK and Ireland, which show that 11 of the 21 seabird species, where there is confidence in their trends, have declined since the last census in 1998-2002,” it says.

It notes that results differ significantly by region or country, with “ encouraging trends” in Ireland for species such as the Black-headed Gull and the Arctic Tern.

At the overall census level, the Arctic Tern breeding population is in decline (35%), but the population is considered stable across the island of Ireland.

The Black-headed Gull, which breeds on inland wetlands as well as the coast, has suffered an overall decline of 26%, but this is in contrast with an analysis of Irish data, which shows increases (Ireland 84%; NI 23%, all-island 40%), it says.

Overall, Black-legged Kittiwake has declined by 42% since the last census, but the population in Northern Ireland “bucks this trend” and shows an increase of 33%, it says.

“Further south in Ireland, the population of Kittiwake is in decline (36%),” it says.

“Little appears to have changed in the colonies where they breed, so these declines are driven by changes in the marine ecosystem upon which they depend,” it suggests.

“Other main drivers for declining populations vary between species and even location, however, there are some prevalent themes,” it says.

These include predation by American mink, which may have been released onto or swum to seabird colony islands, and brown rats, which may have stowed away on boats.

“Climate change is another important factor. Adverse weather conditions are causing nest sites to be swept away and making foraging conditions more difficult,”it says.

“ Increased water temperatures reduce the availability of important food such as small fish, for example, sand eels and sprats, which leads to seabird parents not finding enough food,” it notes.

“This could be exacerbated by fish stock depletion by commercial fisheries, meaning that there is not enough food to go around during the important breeding season,” it says.

Published in Marine Wildlife
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BirdWatch Ireland has welcomed the announcement of a new scheme for the protection and conservation of breeding waders.

€30 million has been set aside for the Breeding Wader EIP (European Innovation Partnership), according to the Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm Noonan.

A sum of €22.5 million is to be invested by the National Parks and Wildlife Service, with the remaining €7.5 million coming from the Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine.

"Waders are amongst the most threatened of all breeding birds in Ireland"

Waders are amongst the most threatened of all breeding birds in Ireland, with six of the eight regularly occurring species on the Red List of Birds of Conservation Concern in Ireland, Birdwatch Ireland says.

The six species are the curlew, lapwing, dunlin, golden plover, redshank and snipe.

Five of these species have declined by at least 50% in the last 40 years.

Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm NoonanMinister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform, Malcolm Noonan

Curlew and lapwing have each declined by over 90% in the last 20 years and are considered to be approaching globally threatened status by BirdLife International, it says.

“Loss of breeding habitat through agricultural intensification, draining of peatlands and afforestation have all contributed to these declines, but widespread predation of nests and chicks by generalist predators such as foxes and crows have also severely impacted remaining populations in recent years,” Birdwatch Ireland says.

The organisation says it had previously recognised that a scheme underpinned by at least €30 million was required to support farmers to undertake measures to save Ireland’s breeding waders from extinction.

“ We are pleased that the Irish government has taken heed,” it said.

“The Government has been implementing measures aimed at protecting and restoring populations, for example, through the Acres Co-operation scheme and the Curlew Conservation Programmes. However, more ambitious plans are required if these iconic birds are to be saved from extinction,” it says.

“The new measures which have just been announced could make a significant difference to saving breeding waders, but must be targeted and implemented correctly,” Birdwatch Ireland chief executive officer Linda Lennon said.

“ Farmers have long wanted to act for nature but have lacked the funding to enable them to do so. This new funding stream must enable farmers to put in place habitat management measures to protect breeding waders on their land.”

“Predator control measures, including the installation of specialised fencing to exclude predators, must also be part of the solution. The effectiveness of such fencing has already been proven beyond doubt by projects implemented by BirdWatch Ireland and others and is crucial to efforts to save our breeding waders,” she said.

Published in Marine Wildlife

Over 70 per cent of marine mammals in US waters face “major threats” from climate change, a study by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has found.

As The Irish Examiner and Press Association report, loss of dissolved oxygen and changes to ocean chemistry will have a significant impact. The study involved more than 100 stocks of marine mammal species in US waters.

Warming ocean temperatures, shrinking polar ice, and a rise in sea levels pose severe risks, with loss of habitat and food. The study has found that large whales, including humpback and North Atlantic right whales, along with dolphins, are among the most vulnerable.

Marine mammals living in the western North Atlantic ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea were the focus of the study, and the findings are published in the journal the journal PLOS One.

Read more in The Irish Examiner here

Published in Marine Wildlife
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Birdwatch Ireland is seeking volunteers to participate in its Irish Wetland Bird Survey, which informs waterbird conservation and management in Ireland.

Individuals with a telescope and good bird identification skills are encouraged to volunteer, as there are a number of vacant sites.

There are currently over 500 Irish Wetland Bird Survey volunteers who have contributed to a substantial gathering of data since it was established in 1994.

Many of the vacant sites are small and close together, meaning one person could easily fill several of these gaps in a few short hours, it says.

Some areas which have teams of counters often need an extra pair of experienced eyes.

The 2023/24 season will be the 30th year of the Irish Wetland Bird Survey.

Survey leaders are also keen to know if waterbirds are using a location in an area that is not currently part of its monitoring network so they can add it as a new subsite.

Anyone interested in joining a count team or helping out at other sites is asked to email Niamh at [email protected].

Published in Marine Wildlife

Sensitive habitats such as the Kish Bank off the coast of Dublin and Wicklow have no protection in spite of promised legislation, the Irish Wildlife Trust (IWT) has said.

The NGO has welcomed the announcement by Minister of State for Heritage Malcolm Noonan that a large new special protection area (SPA) for birds is to be designated in the north-west Irish Sea.

“SPAs are designated under existing legislation for the protection of birds and are a form of marine protected area (MPA),” the IWT said in a statement.

“ The announcement brings the coverage of our marine environment falling within designated areas for nature to nearly 10%,” the IWT said.

“The new designation, along with other recent announcements, are vitally important in ensuring that future developments do not result in harm to these sensitive places,” it said.

“ However, in nearly all instances, harmful activities, particularly from fishing, are already underway. If MPAs are to be effective, they must control the fishing,” it said.

The IWT said it was calling on Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine Charlie McConalogue, to “accelerate the process of carrying out fisheries assessments in existing MPAs in line with goals to protect and restore biodiversity”.

“creating new MPAs is a critical step in the protection of our seas”

“In particular, this means removing particularly harmful activities such as dredging, bottom trawling or mid-water trawling from these areas,” it said.

“Earlier this year, the European Commission called for the removal of bottom-towed fishing gear from all MPAs and asked that member states, including Ireland, produce a plan for the ending of these practices in existing MPAs by next March,” it said.

IWT campaign officer Pádraic Fogarty said that “creating new MPAs is a critical step in the protection of our seas”.

“They are the foundations for long-term management, but without the management and especially the removal of particularly harmful fishing practices, the designations are meaningless,”he said.

The Government has set a target of protecting 30% of Irish seas by 2030.

Published in Marine Planning
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An area in the northwest Irish Sea is to be designated as Ireland’s largest ever protected zone for birds.

The proposed new special protection area (SPA) will cover over 230,000 hectares and will increase Ireland’s percentage of marine waters protected under the EU Birds and Habitats directive to over 9 per cent.

That’s according to Minister of State for Heritage and Electoral Reform Malcolm Noonan and National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) director general Niall Ó Donnchú.

Mr Ó Donnchú declared the designation as a “milestone” for the “protection of Ireland’s marine biodiversity”.

The new SPA adjoins twelve existing SPAs already designated along the coast in this area, he says.

The publication of detailed information and maps for the site brings “certainty and clarity to a long-mooted proposal for protections for marine birds in this area”, they state.

“This site, at more than 230,000 hectares, is the largest SPA designation for birds in Ireland’s history,” Mr Noonan said.

“We are working hard as a Government to ensure we have robust protections in place for nature as we work to deliver on our offshore renewable energy objectives. Biodiversity action and climate action must go hand in hand, “he said.

The new north-west Irish Sea SPA extends offshore along the coasts of counties Louth, Meath and Dublin.

It will be of “conservation interest” for these seabirds: Common Scoter; Red-throated Diver; Great Northern Diver; Fulmar; Manx Shearwater; Shag; Cormorant; Little Gull; Kittiwake; Black-headed Gull; Common Gull; Lesser Black-backed Gull, Herring Gull, Great Black-backed Gull, Little Tern, Roseate Tern, Common Tern, Arctic Tern, Puffin, Razorbill and Guillemot

It will adjoin these existing protected areas: Lambay Island SPA; Skerries Island SPA; Ireland's Eye SPA; Howth Head SPA; Rockabill SPA; South Dublin Bay and River Tolka Estuary SPA; Boyne Estuary SPA; River Nanny Estuary and Shore SPA; Rogerstown Estuary SPA; Malahide Estuary SPA; Baldoyle Bay SPA and North Bull Island SPA.

More detailed information about the site, including a map, a species list and a list of the Activities Requiring Consent (ARCs) for the site is available on www.npws.ie/protectedsites.

The NPWS says that in keeping with the Birds and Habitats Regulations 2011, any person with an interest in the proposed site may submit an objection or observation at the following email address: [email protected].

“Objections or observations may only be based on scientific, ornithological grounds,” it says.

Published in Marine Wildlife
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Minister of State for Heritage Malcolm Noonan has pledged to find “common ground between fishers, farmers, foresters, NGOs, businesses, scientists and the public” to develop a national restoration plan.

He was commenting after MEPs voted to pass the Nature Restoration Law at the European Parliament.

Welcoming the outcome of the vote, Noonan said he knew that “there are some communities who will be very concerned at today’s news”.

“Let me be clear: nature restoration can only be delivered with the full support of the farming, forestry and fishing communities who own and/or manage our lands and seas. This support is something that, with the help of colleagues across Government, I intend to earn,” he said.

Birdwatch Ireland said a very “weakened law” had been passed, and said it was “really alarming to see that the provisions to restore farmland biodiversity and peatlands were removed completely.

The Irish Wildlife Trust (IWT) said it was delighted that MEPs voted to pass the law, and described it as a “substantial step forward for the European Green Deal”.

“While it could be more ambitious, the law has not been stopped at this critical stage in the biodiversity crisis,” the IWT said.

IWT marine advocacy officer Grace Carr said that amendments involving the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) are a “step forward for marine restoration and biodiversity”.

She said that there is “still work to be done in negotiations to make the law more ambitious than it currently is”.

The amendment relating to the CFP will ensure member states can put conservation measures in place to protect ecosystems in their waters, the IWT noted, and said this was “particularly welcome”.

Published in Marine Wildlife
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Birdwatch Ireland has welcomed a decision to extend marine protection for a North Atlantic sea area outside of Ireland’s exclusive economic zone.

The seafloor of the North Atlantic Current and Evlanov Sea Basin (NACES) has been given marine protected area (MPA) designation by 15 governments, including Ireland, which are signatories to the OSPAR convention.

The 600,000 km2 area is east of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and north of the Azores.

“The NACES MPA is a vital wintering ground for the globally threatened Atlantic puffin, a species in rapid decline and one which also breeds in Ireland during the summer and is much loved,” Birdwatch Ireland marine policy and advocacy officer Sinead Loughran said.

She described the decision is “an incredibly important first step to ensure that this biodiversity hotspot in the North Atlantic high seas” can continue to support an “ abundance and diversity of marine life”.

The sea basin which is the size of continental France, was designated in 2021, after research by BirdLife International showed that five million seabirds, including puffins breeding on Skellig Michael, use it every year.

The extension to protect the seafloor was agreed by OSPAR signatories in Oslo, Norway, last week.

This is due to the location’s significance for a “multitude” of marine species and the value of its seabed habitats.

Evidence gathered over the last two years also shows the NACES MPA is key marine habitat for blue and fin whales, leatherback and loggerhead turtles, basking sharks, European eels and Atlantic bluefin tuna.

The MPA’s seafloor habitat includes over 30 seamounts, with vulnerable marine ecosystems, such as deep-sea sponges and coral gardens, serving as “crucial pillars for supporting a wide array of vibrant ecosystems”.

Over 16,400 people had supported a petition by BirdWatch Ireland and BirdLife International for better protection of the site.

The organisations say it is now “essential that OSPAR develops a management plan for the site”.

The 1992 OSPAR Convention for the Protection of the Marine Environment of the North-East Atlantic involves Ireland, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Iceland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and Britain, along with the EU.

Published in Marine Planning
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Port of Cork Information

The Port of Cork is the key seaport in the south of Ireland and is one of only two Irish ports which service the requirements of all six shipping modes i.e., Lift-on Lift-off, Roll-on Roll-off, Liquid Bulk, Dry Bulk, Break Bulk and Cruise. Due to its favourable location on the south coast of Ireland and its modern deep-water facilities, the Port of Cork is ideally positioned for additional European trading as well as for yet unexploited direct deep-sea shipping services.

The Port of Cork is investing €80 million in a container terminal development in Ringaskiddy. The Cork Container Terminal will initially offer a 360-metre quay with 13-metre depth alongside and will enable larger ships to berth in the port. The development also includes the construction of a 13.5-hectare terminal and associated buildings as well as two ship to shore gantry cranes and container handling equipment.

The development of new container handling facilities at Ringaskiddy was identified in the Port of Cork’s Strategic Development Plan in 2010. It will accommodate current and future container shipping which can be serviced by modern and efficient cargo handling equipment with innovative terminal operating and vehicle booking systems. The Port of Cork anticipates that Cork Container Terminal will be operational in 2020.

The Port of Cork is the key seaport in the south of Ireland and is one of just two Irish ports which service the requirements of all shipping modes.

The Port of Cork also controls Bantry Bay Port Company and employs 150 people across all locations.

A European Designated Core Port and a Tier 1 Port of National Significance, Port of Cork’s reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround as well as the company’s investment in future growth, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain.

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades, most recently with the construction of the new €80m Cork Container Terminal in Ringaskiddy which will facilitate the natural progression of the move from a river port to a deepwater port in order to future proof the Port
of Cork. This state-of-the-art terminal which will open in 2020 will be capable of berthing the largest container ships currently calling to Ireland.

The Port of Cork Company is a commercial semi-state company responsible for the commercial running of the harbour as well as responsibility for navigation and berthage in the port.  The Port is the main port serving the South of Ireland, County Cork and Cork City. 

Types of Shipping Using Port of Cork

The Port offers all six shipping modes from Lift-on Lift-off, Roll-on Roll-off, Liquid Bulk, Dry Bulk, Break Bulk and Cruise liner traffic.

Port of Cork Growth

The port has made impressive strides in recent decades. Since 2000, the Port of Cork has invested €72 million in improving Port infrastructure and facilities. Due to its favourable location and its modern deepwater facilities, the Port is ideally positioned for additional European trading as well as for yet unexploited direct deep-sea shipping services. A well-developed road infrastructure eases the flow of traffic from and to the port. The Port of Cork’s growing reputation for quality service, including prompt and efficient vessel turnaround, ensures its position as a vital link in the global supply chain. The Port of Cork Company turnover in 2018 amounted to €35.4 million, an increase of €3.9 million from €31.5 million in 2017. The combined traffic of both the Ports of Cork and Bantry increased to 10.66 million tonnes in 2018 up from 10.3 million tonnes in 2017.

History of Port of Cork

Famous at the last port of call of the Titanic, these medieval navigation and port facilities of the city and harbour were historically managed by the Cork Harbour Commissioners. Founded in 1814, the Cork Harbour Commissioners moved to the Custom House in 1904.  Following the implementation of the 1996 Harbours Act, by March 1997 all assets of the Commissioners were transferred to the Port of Cork Company.

Commercial Traffic at Port of Cork

Vessels up to 90,000 tonnes deadweight (DWT) are capable of coming through entrance to Cork Harbour. As the shipping channels get shallower the farther inland one travels, access becomes constricted, and only vessels up to 60,000 DWT can sail above Cobh. The Port of Cork provides pilotage and towage facilities for vessels entering Cork Harbour. All vessels accessing the quays in Cork City must be piloted and all vessels exceeding 130 metres in length must be piloted once they pass within 2.5 nautical miles (4.6 km) of the harbour entrance.

Berthing Facilities in Cork Harbour

The Port of Cork has berthing facilities at Cork City, Tivoli, Cobh and Ringaskiddy. The facilities in Cork City are primarily used for grain and oil transport. Tivoli provides container handling, facilities for oil, livestock and ore and a roll on-roll off (Ro-Ro) ramp. Prior to the opening of Ringaskiddy Ferry Port, car ferries sailed from here; now, the Ro-Ro ramp is used by companies importing cars into Ireland. In addition to the ferry terminal, Ringaskiddy has a deep water port.

Port of Cork Development Plans

2020 will be a significant year for the Port of Cork as it prepares to complete and open the €86 million Cork Container Terminal development in Ringaskiddy.

Once operational the new terminal will enable the port to handle up to 450,000 TEU per annum. Port of Cork already possess significant natural depth in Cork harbour, and the work in Ringaskiddy Port will enable the Port of Cork to accommodate vessels of 5500 to 6000 TEU, which will provide a great deal of additional potential for increasing container traffic.

It follows a previous plan hatched in 2006 as the port operated at full capacity the Port drew up plans for a new container facility at Ringaskiddy. This was the subject of major objections and after an Oral Planning Hearing was held in 2008 the Irish planning board Bord Pleanala rejected the plan due to inadequate rail and road links at the location.  

Further notable sustainability projects also include:

  • The Port of Cork have invested in 2 x STS cranes – Type single lift, Model P (148) L, (WS) Super. These cranes contain the most modern and energy-efficient control and monitoring systems currently available on the market and include an LED floodlight system equipped with software to facilitate remote diagnostics, a Crane Management System (CMS) and an energy chain supply on both cranes replacing the previous preferred festoon cabling installation.
  • The Port of Cork has installed High Mast Lighting Voltage Control Units at its two main cargo handling locations – Tivoli Industrial & Dock Estate and Ringaskiddy Deep-water & Ferry Terminals. This investment has led to more efficient energy use and reduced risk of light pollution. The lights can also be controlled remotely.
  • The Port of Cork’s largest electrical consumer at Tivoli Container Terminal is the handling and storage of refrigerated containers. Local data loggers were used to assess energy consumption. This provided timely intervention regarding Power Factor Correction Bank efficiency on our STS (Ship to Shore) Cranes and Substations, allowing for reduced mains demand and reducing wattless energy losses along with excess charges. The information gathered has helped us to design and build a reefer storage facility with energy management and remote monitoring included.

Bantry Port

In 2017 Bantry Bay Port Company completed a significant investment of €8.5 million in the Bantry Inner Harbour development. The development consisted of a leisure marina, widening of the town pier, dredging of the inner harbour and creation of a foreshore amenity space.

Port of Cork Cruise Liner Traffic

2019 was a record cruise season for the Port of Cork with 100 cruise liners visiting. In total over 243,000 passengers and crew visited the region with many passengers visiting Cork for the first time.

Also in 2019, the Port of Cork's Cruise line berth in Cobh was recognised as one of the best cruise destinations in the world, winning in the Top-Rated British Isles & Western Europe Cruise Destination category. 

There has been an increase in cruise ship visits to Cork Harbour in the early 21st century, with 53 such ships visiting the port in 2011, increasing to approximately 100 cruise ship visits by 2019.

These cruise ships berth at the Port of Cork's deepwater quay in Cobh, which is Ireland's only dedicated berth for cruise ships.

Passenger Ferries

Operating since the late 1970s, Brittany Ferries runs a ferry service to Roscoff in France. This operates between April and November from the Ro-Ro facilities at Ringaskiddy. Previous ferry services ran to Swansea in Wales and Santander in Spain. The former, the Swansea Cork ferry, ran initially between 1987 and 2006 and also briefly between 2010 and 2012.

The latter, a Brittany Ferries Cork–Santander service, started in 2018 but was cancelled in early 2020.

Marine Leisure

The Port of Cork has a strategy that aims to promote the harbour also as a leisure amenity. Cork’s superb natural harbour is a great place to enjoy all types of marine leisure pursuits. With lots of sailing and rowing clubs dotted throughout the harbour, excellent fishing and picturesque harbour-side paths for walking, running or cycling, there is something for everyone to enjoy in and around Cork harbour. The Port is actively involved with the promotion of Cork Harbour's annual Festival. The oldest sailing club in the world, founded in 1720, is the Royal Cork Yacht Club is located at Crosshaven in the harbour, proof positive, says the Port, that the people of Cork, and its visitors, have been enjoying this vast natural leisure resource for centuries. 

Port of Cork Executives

  • Chairman: John Mullins
  • Chief Executive: Brendan Keating
  • Secretary/Chief Finance Officer: Donal Crowley
  • Harbour Master and Chief Operations Officer: Capt. Paul O'Regan
  • Port Engineering Manager: Henry Kingston
  • Chief Commercial Officer: Conor Mowlds
  • Head of Human Resources: Peter O'Shaughnessy