Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

Displaying items by tag: Cork Harbour

Here’s a chance for teenagers in Cork with an interest in life at sea to give it a go on board and experience a replica of a 19th-century sailing tall ship.

As CorkBeo writes, the youth sailing charity Sail Training Ireland is looking for those aged between 14 and 17 to take part in a 'training voyage' aboard the 91-foot Spirit of Falmouth between Monday, July 1, and Friday, July 5.

A second similar training voyage for adults aged between 18 and 30 is also to take place for the following week between Monday, July 8, and Friday, July 12.

Both of the voyages will be departing and returning to Cork Harbour.

The trainee sailors on the voyage will take the 1985-built timber-constructed ‘Spirit’ along the south coast to get to grips with life on the open sea. The vessel is based on the design of a traditional Mersey pilot schooner built using traditional methods in Liverpool.

The 88-ton schooner has a core crew of six with the capacity to carry 12 trainee passage crew, according to its operator, Turn to Starboard, based in the schooner’s homeport of Falmouth, Cornwall.

The voyages say Sail Training Ireland is designed to get "young people undertaking voyages on tall ships, effectively as part of the working crew."

Successful applicants will be able to undertake several tasks, including setting the sails, navigation, and climbing the rigging and masts. Accommodation is based on 18 bunks and two cabins, along with two ‘heads’ (toilets) and a purpose-built galley and saloon.

The schooner has the capacity for 12 trainees, and the fee for both the teen and adult voyages is €280.

Published in Tall Ships

A Cork Harbour houseboat resident has told of his shock at seeing a “tornado” whipping towards him on Tuesday afternoon (21 May).

As Echo Live reports, Gavin Higgins was watching TV below deck on his converted classic RNLI lifeboat in Drake’s Pool when he was drawn to his cabin by a loud boom.

“It was a lovely day and I thought it was thunder, but I came up into my cabin and I saw this tornado making its way toward me,” Higgins says.

Video shot by passers-by shows the waterspout — the term for a whirlwind that forms over a body of water — whipping across the normally tranquil anchorage.

Luckily for Higgins, his houseboat the Lilly Wainright was unscathed in the incident.

“I always wanted to retire to Crosshaven and now I have,” the Doncaster native added. “I’m at home here, although I don’t know why God sent a tornado after me!”

Ireland is not known for such extreme weather events, but last December a tornado dealt significant damage to a number of moored motor cruisers in Co Leitrim, as previously reported on Afloat.ie.

Published in Cork Harbour

After a break since the impact of Covid, the Cork Harbour Combined Cruiser League is to be held again.

It will start on Friday, June 5, and be jointly organised by the Royal Cork YC and Cove SC. It is open to both Whitesail and Spinnaker racing and will run for four Fridays in June.

The event is sponsored by Johanna Murphy and Associates.

"It promises to be a fantastic league with the Harbour Clubs working together to deliver great racing for both clubs," says RCYC Rear Admiral Keelboats, Rob Foster.

The overall league prize-giving will be on Friday, June 28, in Cobh.

Sailing Instructions and the Notice of Race are being published on club websites.

Published in Cork Harbour

On Saturday morning, the Carrigaline Choral Group participated in the annual Darkness into Light national fundraiser with the Royal Cork Yacht Club. Up to 30 pleasure crafts sailed out into Cork Harbour before sunrise to support the charity Pieta, which raises awareness about suicide and provides support to those suffering from suicidal ideation, self-harm, or those bereaved by suicide.

A flotilla of up to 30 boats headed out into a misty Cork Harbour for the annual Darkness into Light national fundraiser with the Royal Cork Yacht Club Photo: Bob BatemanA flotilla of up to 30 boats headed out into a misty Cork Harbour for the annual Darkness into Light national fundraiser with the Royal Cork Yacht Club Photo: Bob Bateman

The flotilla was led by Royal Cork Yacht Club Admiral Annamarie Fegan. The Carrigaline Choral Group was onboard the RCYC's Committee boat, Gem, and was accompanied by the Crosshaven RNLI inshore lifeboat.

The  Darkness into Light flotilla of boats included the Crosshaven RNLI inshore lifeboat Photo: Bob BatemanThe  Darkness into Light flotilla of boats included the Crosshaven RNLI inshore lifeboat Photo: Bob Bateman

Although there was a foggy start to the proceedings, the boats set off from Crosshaven in a parade and headed for the entrance to Cork Harbour just off Roches Point.

Royal Cork Yacht Club Committee Boat Gem, skippered by marina manager Mark Ring underneath Roches Point at sunrise for the Darkness into Light charity appeal  Photo: Bob BatemanRoyal Cork Yacht Club Committee Boat Gem, skippered by marina manager Mark Ring underneath Roches Point at sunrise for the Darkness into Light charity appeal  Photo: Bob Bateman

At 5:45 a.m., just after sunrise, Admiral Fegan raised the club pennant to honour the Darkness into Light charity appeal, and the choir, led by honorary choral secretary Mary Malone, sang in the misty morning. 

Royal Cork Yacht Club Admiral Annamarie Fegan raises the club pennant to honour the Darkness into Light charity appeal Photo: Bob BatemanRoyal Cork Yacht Club Admiral Annamarie Fegan raises the club pennant to honour the Darkness into Light charity appeal Photo: Bob Bateman

Carrigaline Choral Group perform at sunrise off Roches Point in Cork Harbour as part of the Royal Cork Yacht Club's support of the annual Darkness into Light national fundraiser Photo: Bob BatemanCarrigaline Choral Group perform at sunrise off Roches Point in Cork Harbour as part of the Royal Cork Yacht Club's support of the annual Darkness into Light national fundraiser Photo: Bob Bateman

After the event, the fleet returned to the clubhouse for tea, coffee, and croissants.

Pieta was founded in Dublin in 2006 to provide free, accessible one-to-one counselling to people in need.

Royal Cork Yacht Club's 2024 'Darkness into Light' Fundraiser in aid of Pieta House Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman

Published in Royal Cork YC

One of Cork Harbour’s most notorious islands, Spike, is the subject of a new book published this week.

“Spike Island—the Rebels, Residents, and Crafty Criminals of Ireland’s Historic Island” was written by John Crotty and will be launched by Cork’s deputy mayor, Dr Colette Finn, on Tuesday (April 30).

The book charts how, over its 1300-year history, the island was once a monastic outpost in the Celtic Sea, a fortress built to defend an Empire, and, latterly, a prison established to intern a nation.

The island has garnered international attention many times, such as the famine-era prison overcrowding and inhumane conditions, the triumphant 1938 handover of the island from Britain to Ireland, and the violent prison riot in 1985.

Spike Island's Mitchel Hall Photo: SkytecSpike Island's Mitchel Hall Photo: Skytec

Located in the centre of Cork Harbour, Spike housed rebels like John Mitchel, who would inspire the 1916 generation, and 1200 Republicans during the War of Independence.

More recent arrivals include the notorious crime boss, Martin Cahill, known as “The General”, who terrorised 1980’s Ireland.

The book’s author, John Crotty, hails from Co Waterford and spent 11 years living in Britain, where he graduated from Swansea University.

An aerial view of Spike Island in Cork Harbour  Photo: SkytecAn aerial view of Spike Island in Cork Harbour  Photo: Skytec

On his return, John managed Spike Island Cork as CEO for six years, leading the island to international awards.

Under his stewardship, the island launched its popular “After Dark” tours and the first Spike Island Literary Festival.

Spike Island's 1850s punishment block Photo: Simon HillSpike Island's 1850s punishment block Photo: Simon Hill

“No other place better encapsulates the Irish story,” the book’s publishers, Merrion Press, state. Crotty’s history is told in “an entertaining and accessible chronological style featuring accounts from island dwellers and the interned alike.”

Spike Island - the Rebels,Residents and Crafty Criminals of Ireland’s Historic Island by John Crotty is available in paperback at €18.99 (£17.99) from Merrion Press.

It will be launched with Cork deputy mayor Finn in Waterstone’s, St Patrick’s Street, Cork, on Tuesday, April 30th, at 6.30 pm.

The book’s author, John Crotty, hails from Co Waterford and spent 11 years living in Britain, where he graduated from Swansea University.The book’s author, John Crotty, hails from Co Waterford and spent 11 years living in Britain, where he graduated from Swansea University.

Published in Cork Harbour
Tagged under

The 2024 Fireball Munster Championships were held on April 20th/21st at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club (MBSC) in stunning weather conditions writes the club's Chris Bateman

It had seemed like a long time coming, but alas, the wait was finally over, and the eve of the first event of the season for the Fireball class had arrived. Months of harsh winter sailing had been endured and so the event at Monkstown Bay was met with much enthusiasm and excitement from the Fireball sailors.
Sailors travelled from all over Ireland to attend, such as Dublin, Sligo, Wexford, Kerry and Cork, to name a few.

The first morning of the championship in Monkstown was a spectacular sight. Twenty-five Fireballs were packed into the dinghy park with competitors rigging at speed, eager to hit the water. Covers were folded away and sails unrolled. The crinkle of fresh spinnakers and sounds of enthusiastic chat were heard from all over. The atmosphere was bright and cheerful, the water a sparkling blue. The wind was warm and the sun was high, with a light sea breeze starting to fill in across the harbour. The air thrummed with anticipation while busy volunteers prepared for the day's racing.

The race area was set off Cuskinny Beach, some distance away from the sailing club. Race Officer Dave Barry and his team, along with Johnny Moynihan and co., set off early to prepare the triangular course in time for the midday starting gun. The Fireball sailors followed suit, launching early in their excitement for the races to come.

 Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Race Officer Johnny Moynihan and has team set the course for the bumper Fireball fleet in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman Monkstown Bay Sailing Club Race Officers Johnny Moynihan and Dave Barry and their team set the courses for the bumper Fireball fleet in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

The wind filled in slowly from the South East, spreading across the course in an unsettled manner. Big wind shifts were to be the order of business for the day. The committee had a course set right on time despite the shifts.

When the five-minute gun sounded for Race One, the competitors piled onto the start line, jostling for position.

A race start for the bumper Fireball fleet in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob BatemanA race start for the bumper Fireball fleet in Cork Harbour Photo: Bob Bateman

The fleet eagerly pushed forward on the line until finally, the race was underway. It was a drag race to the first big shift on the starboard side of the course. The fleet was highly competitive with big position changes happening on every leg of the three lap course. It was to be a battle of patience and perseverance. In the end it was the team of Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix of NYC who took first place, having played every shift as well as could be done. Just behind in second was Adrian Lee and Ossian Geraghty of MBSC. Daniel and Harry Thompson of Wexford took third place having picked up a big wind shift on the final lap of the race.
Race Two got underway in a clean manner. Ed Butler and crew Iso Inan of Sligo made the most of the light and tricky winds, to take first place. Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington of MBSC took second place. In third place it was Lee/Geraghty. All three scraped just ahead of the three boats competing behind in what was very nearly a six boat photo finish.

(Above and below) Colourful spinnakers as the fleet go downwind at the Fireball Munster Championships against the backdrop of Cork Harbour  Photo: Bob Bateman(Above and below) Colourful spinnakers as the fleet go downwind at the Fireball Munster Championships against the backdrop of Cork Harbour  Photo: Bob Bateman

(Above and below) Colourful spinnakers as the fleet go downwind at the Fireball Munster Championships against the backdrop of Cork Harbour  Photo: Bob Bateman(Above and below) Colourful spinnakers as the fleet go downwind at the Fireball Munster Championships against the backdrop of Cork Harbour  Photo: Bob Bateman

Race three was won by the current national champions Noel Butler and Stephen Oram of NYC. Having been slightly behind in the first two races, they found their mojo and left the fleet behind in the final race of the day. The ever consistent team of Barry/Rimmington took second place, with Ferguson/Chaix in third.
With three successful races completed the fleet headed for home in the scorching sun.

Overnight leaders were Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix of NYC, who sailed a fantastic three races and showed their tactical skills in the best way possible.

Day two

Day two of the championship opened in a similar fashion. A lazy sun hung low over the bay and the sky was blue. The harbour was as still as a mill pond. A low tide made the bay look small but the birds sang and the water was inviting. The competitors arrived early, bulling to hit the water and get racing. The start was set an hour earlier than the day previous. The wind was due to fill in from the East, just in time for the first race.

Sails were hoisted and colourful spinnakers dried. Onlookers and supporters sat by, enjoying the spectacle.

The competitors prepared their tow lines in anticipation of a long haul out to the race area. Launching into the still waters of the bay, they paddled up to the tow boats and made fast their painters. Happy faces poked out from underneath bright sails and they began the tow out to Cuskinny.

The wind filled in from the East just as the hoard of Fireballs arrived at the race area. A soft eight-knot breeze blew over the course. There was a small wait for the breeze to settle, but it soon calmed down and proved to be gentle and consistent.

Race Four of the series kicked off at 11U30am. It became evident that overnight the fleet had become even more competitive, pushing the start line to the limit and fighting even harder all across the racecourse. All in good spirits, of course!

At the first windward mark, Ritchie Harrington and Sandy OʼBrien of MBSC took first place, sailing in at speed on the starboard layline. Three rounds later, at the finish line, Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington took first place, sailing well in the shifty conditions. Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix took second place. In third place, Louise McKenna and Hermine Oʼ Keefe of RStGYC took third place.

For Race Five, the wind had swung around to the South East and picked up slightly. At the top it was a battle of four boats. Noel Butler and Stephen Oram fought against Barry/Rimmington, while Ferguson/Chaix fought with Chris Bateman and Lauren Murphy of MBSC. Positions changed constantly throughout the race and in the end it was Butler/Oram who took first place, with Barry/Rimmington in second and Ferguson/Chaix in third.

Race Six, the final race of the series brought 40 degree wind shifts and huge pressure changes, making it the most difficult of the day. The Thompson brothers led at the windward mark, however they were not safe. Barry/ Rimmington snapped at their heels in second, with Ferguson/Chaix in third. By the bottom of the leg, Bateman/Murphy had caught up and the next upwind became another battle between the four boats. Positions changed constantly and the racing was tight. Bateman/Murphy pulled into second, Barry/ Rimmington dropped back to fourth. However by the top mark, the top four had sailed into a wind hole and wallowed with sails hanging limp for a minute. Barry/Rimmington picked up a 30 degree shift from the right and crossed the fleet in first place while the rest wallowed. A 60 degree wind shift from the left ten seconds later allowed Ed Butler to sail back into contention, and Ferguson/ Chaix slipped passed the Thompons. Bateman/Murphy dropped back, having gotten stuck between both shifts.

In the end it was Ferguson/Chaix who took first place across the line, ahead of Barry/Rimmington in second place. The Thompsons held on to third place.

This concluded the day, and the fleet sailed home tired and happy. It had been a fantastic day racing in champagne sailing conditions. Upon arrival at the sailing club, the boats were packed away, sails rolled and covers donned. Once the pack was finished the weary competitors migrated to the club and basked in the evening sun while awaiting the prizegving. Easy conversation was had over cold drinks and discussion of the next Fireball Championship had already begun.

Monkstown Bay's Chris Bateman hard at work as class promoter, event organiser and competitor at the Fireball Munster ChampionshipsMonkstown Bay's Chris Bateman hard at work as class promoter, event organiser and competitor at the Fireball Munster Championships

The prizes were presented by MBSCʼs commodore Jacqui OʼBrien.

Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington of the host club won the Fireball Munster Championships (their first Fireball event).

Top Ten Fireballs at the Munsters 

10th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Ritchie Harrington/Sandy O’Brien Photo: Bob Bateman10th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Ritchie Harrington/Sandy O’Brien Photo: Bob Bateman

 9th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Frank Miller/Neil Cramer Photo: Bob Bateman 9th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Frank Miller/Neil Cramer Photo: Bob Bateman

8th  at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Chris Bateman/Lauren Murphy Photo: Bob Bateman8th  at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Chris Bateman/Lauren Murphy Photo: Bob Bateman

 

7th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Daniel and Harry Thompson 7th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Daniel and Harry Thompson 

6th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Louise McKenna and Hermione O'Keeffe Photo: Bob Bateman6th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Louise McKenna and Hermione O'Keeffe

5th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Ed Butler/Ismael Inan 5th Photo: Bob Bateman5th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Ed Butler/Ismael Inan 5th Photo: Bob Bateman

4th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Adrian Lee/Ossian Geraghty Photo: Bob Bateman4th at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Adrian Lee/Ossian Geraghty Photo: Bob Bateman

3rd at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Noel Butler/Stephen Oram Photo: Bob Bateman3rd at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Noel Butler/Stephen Oram Photo: Bob Bateman

2nd at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix Photo: Bob Bateman2nd at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club - Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix Photo: Bob Bateman

1st  at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club -  Sandy Rimmington and Ewen Barry Photo: Bob Bateman1st  at the Fireball Munster Championships at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club -  Sandy Rimmington and Ewen Barry Photo: Bob Bateman

Winners Sandy Rimmington and Ewen Barry of MBSC with MBSCʼs commodore Jacqui OʼBrienWinners Sandy Rimmington and Ewen Barry of MBSC with MBSCʼs commodore Jacqui OʼBrien

Second place went to Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix of the National Yacht Club, competing in their first event as a team.

Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix of the National Yacht ClubNicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix of the National Yacht Club

Third place went to Noel Butler and Stephen Oram of the National Yacht Club.

Stephen Oram and Noel Butler of the National Yacht ClubStephen Oram and Noel Butler of the National Yacht Club

Winning the silver fleet were Brian Jones and Barry OʼConnor of MBSC, in their first Fireball event.

Brian Jones and Barry OʼConnor of MBSCBrian Jones and Barry OʼConnor of MBSC

Second place in the silver fleet went to Colm and Cormac Breene of DMYC. Third place in silver went to Paul ter Horst and Pat McGoldrick, also of DMYC.

Paul ter Horst and Pat McGoldrickPaul ter Horst and Pat McGoldrick

Winner of the Classic trophy for his recent restoration of his Fireball named “Whiskey” went to 16-year-old Sean OʼHerlihy from Iniscarra Sailing and Kayaking Club, sailing with his new helm, Frances Corkery of the same club.

Sean O'Herlihy and Frances Corkery were winners of the Fireball classic trophySean O'Herlihy and Frances Corkery were winners of the Fireball classic trophy

This concluded the first event of the season for the Fireball Class. The championship was an extreme success, with sailors coming from all over the country. The weather could not have been better, and the atmosphere could not have been happier. No fleet will match the Fireballs for their comradeship, friendliness, kind nature, and value. The class continues to grow rapidly as the people in our little country are quickly realising that the boat that they have been missing throughout their lives is a Fireball!

2024 Fireball Munster Championship Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman

(with thanks to photo boat driver Alex Barry for his assistance)

Published in Fireball

On Sunday afternoon, Cork Harbour was poignantly reminded of passing times as the now decommissioned LE Orla (P41) and LE Ciara (P42) were led out of their home port for the last time, heading overseas for disposal at a scrap recycling facility.

Both Peacock-class patrol vessels have been in service with the Irish Naval Service around the Irish coast since 1989.

As Afloat reported in December 2023, the decommissioning of the 712-tonne sister ships was partly due to their age, coincidentally all built in 1984; in addition, the vessels were taken out of service due to the ongoing crewing crisis that has impacted the service, which has led to not enough sailors to crew all its ships. 

A Port of Cork pilot boat escorted the ships out of Cork Harbour in a relatively calm sea, with tugs fore and aft.

LE Orla (P41) and LE Ciara (P42) depart Cork HarbourLE Orla (P41) and LE Ciara (P42) depart Cork Harbour

Published in Navy

Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington of the host club are the 2024 Fireball Munster Champions after a six-race regatta held at Monkstown Bay Sailing Club (MBSC) in Cork Harbour.

A bumper 24-boat fleet contested the light to medium wind championships that is an early season boost for the class that staged the class world championship on Lough Derg in 2022.

Munster Fireball Champions 2024 - Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington of Monkstown Bay Sailing ClubMunster Fireball Champions 2024 - Ewen Barry and Sandy Rimmington of Monkstown Bay Sailing Club

Overnight leaders in the light to medium wind event saw Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix, also of the NYC, lost out to Barry and Rimmington by a single point on Sunday. 

National champions Noel Butler and Stephen Oram of the National Yacht Club on Dublin Bay finish third overall.

Second overall Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix at the 2024 Fireball Munster Championships Photo Bob Bateman Second overall Nicola Ferguson and Thomas Chaix at the 2024 Fireball Munster Championships Photo Bob Bateman 

There has been a resurgence of interest in the high-performance dinghy that has seen up to ten Fireballs in local competition over the winter in Cork Harbour.

2024 Fireball Munster Championship Photo Gallery by Bob Bateman

(with thanks to photo boat driver Alex Barry for his assistance)

Published in Fireball

Crosshaven in Cork Harbour is getting another sail loft.

Cork sailor ‘Nin' Nicholas O’Leary has announced that the former ‘Old Sunday Market’ building across the road from the Royal Cork Yacht Club in the village will be his base.

This follows the opening of a loft in Rush, north County Dublin in February, headed by David Kelly, who over the past decade has worked with various sailmakers across the industry and joined the Doyle Sails Solent Loft two years ago. He has raced Grand Prix boats such as the Cape 31s.

O’Leary has extensive world racing experience and has been with Doyle Sails of New Zealand, since 2019.

David KellyDavid Kelly

“David and I have been planning this for some time,” he told Afloat. “The Crosshaven loft has combined floor space of 400 sq.metres. Cleo Watkin, who formerly worked with Des McWilliam at Crosshaven, will manage the service, repairs and manufacturing requirements at the loft when it is up and running in the next two months at the Old Sunday Market, most recently known as the Hasset's Cafe building, 30 metres from the Royal Cork Yacht Club dinghy park fence.”

This brings the number of lofts in the Crosshaven area to three: UK Sailmakers Ireland, with a shop store at Crosshaven and a sail loft in nearby Carrigaline and Nigel Young running North Sails Ireland at Myrtleville and Cork Olympian Mark Mansfield running the Quantum Sails brand; which has a loft in Galway.

Published in Marine Trade
Tagged under

Fáilte Ireland has announced the development of a Cork harbour tourism plan to “ enhance the visitor experience” and “unlock” its tourism potential.

The plan, developed in partnership with Cork County Council, Cork City Council and Port of Cork, aims to “position Cork Harbour as a world-class tourism destination and support the sustainable development of this area into a must-visit destination”, it says.

It has been billed as a key element of Fáilte Ireland’s five-year “Destination and Experience Development Plan” (DEDP) for Cork city, harbour and east Cork.

The tourism body says it will “create a focal point for Cork’s maritime story, seeking to improve accessibility, capacity, interpretation, visitor facilities, visitor flow as well as visitor experiences”.

Fáilte Ireland announces development of new plan to transform visitor experience in Cork Harbour - Ann Doherty Chief Executive, Cork City Council , Paul O’Regan Harbour Master and COO, Port of Cork , Brian O’Flynn Head of Ireland’s Ancient East, Fáilte Ireland , Andrew Hayley Director, The Paul Hogarth Company and Valerie O’ Sullivan Chief Executive, Cork County Council , Fáilte Ireland in partnership with Cork County Council, Cork City Council and Port of Cork today announced plans to develop a Cork Harbour Tourism Plan, which will enhance the visitor experience and unlock the tourism potential to position Cork Harbour as a world-class tourism destination and support the sustainable development of this area into a must-visit destination Photo: Gerard McCarthyFáilte Ireland announces development of new plan to transform visitor experience in Cork Harbour - Ann Doherty Chief Executive, Cork City Council, Paul O’Regan Harbour Master and COO, Port of Cork , Brian O’Flynn Head of Ireland’s Ancient East, Fáilte Ireland , Andrew Hayley Director, The Paul Hogarth Company and Valerie O’ Sullivan Chief Executive, Cork County Council, Fáilte Ireland in partnership with Cork County Council, Cork City Council and Port of Cork today announced plans to develop a Cork Harbour Tourism Plan, which will enhance the visitor experience and unlock the tourism potential to position Cork Harbour as a world-class tourism destination and support the sustainable development of this area into a must-visit destination Photo: Gerard McCarthy

“ It will also include a high-level review of visitor orientation in the Cork harbour area with recommendations to improve transport, look at sustainable transport initiatives and encourage a greater spread of visitors throughout the area,”it says.

It says that as the “largest natural harbour in the northern hemisphere”, Cork is “currently underutilised from a leisure tourism perspective” and there is an opportunity to increase visitor numbers.

It says this can be achieved by “building on the uniqueness offered by the Cork harbour islands, which are supported by great on-water experiences linking the harbour islands and harbour communities”.

“Developing on the existing greenways, blueways and transport links will increase the accessibility of Cork harbour and its communities to Cork City, and enabling improved land and sea linkages between the city and harbour will create something that is unique on the island of Ireland,” Fáilte Ireland says.

Mayor of the County of Cork, Cllr. Frank O’Flynn and Cork City Council Chief Executive Ann Doherty have welcomed the plan, along with Port of Cork harbour master Paul O’Regan.

Published in Cork Harbour
Tagged under
Page 1 of 96

About Electric outboard engines

The direct-drive component in electric outboard engines means that the electric motors are incredibly efficient compared to conventional marine combustion motors, operating with considerably higher torque whilst using less power.

Without any need for gears, cooling systems and moving parts the motors are maintenance free, highly efficient and economic to run.

As a result, electric boat engines are becoming more popular on Irish waters as the world transitions from fossil fuels to green energy.

To date, popular electric engine sizes have been trolling engines typically used by fishermen on lakes.

These marine engines are available in models that can be used in fresh water and sea water, for your boat or kayak.

Electric motors are Ideal for fishermen because they are quiet and create little in the way of disturbance 

Popular electric trolling models range from 30lb thrust to 55lb thrust in a range of shaft lengths.

But use is becoming broader now in 2021 and electric outboard engines are being used on small runabouts and RIBS where electric outboard engine sizes are getting bigger.

Outboard electric engines are economical and environmentally friendly. Battery technology is also improving at a rapid rate meaning they are becoming smaller and lighter and run for longer.

Built in hydro-generation provides alternative recharging options whilst under sail are also options meaning the electric outboard now has a home on the stern on small yachts and dayboats too.

As far back as 2014, Torqeedo owner Jack O'Keefe from Cork Harbour told Afloat readers of his sailing adventures in a Drascombe Coaster dinghy and how after swapping from a petrol version the rewards from his new electric outboard engine are less noise, no smells, more stowage, better sailing performance and a motor that can be started by a small child. But it's still not silent, there's a whine he says here 

Popular brands in Ireland are Torqeedo, ePropulsion, Pulsar and Minn Kota but there are more arriving all the time as the technology advances