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During the early hours of this morning Fred Olsen's Cruise Lines 28,388 tonnes Boudicca docked in Dublin Port, marking the inaugural cruise-call for this year's season, writes Jehan Ashmore.
The 880 passenger berth cruiseship with a crew of over 300 had arrived overnight from the Isles of Scilly as part of her cruise itinerary which started from Southampton.

Onboard the ship which caters mostly for the UK market, asides the interior facilities there are the outdoor leisure amenities located on the Lounge Deck which has two jacuzzis and an exercise pool. There is also a large swimming pool and weather permitting a poolside buffet is also available at meal times. In addition a circular pool is located on the Marque Deck.

She alongside sister Black Watch belong to a four-ship fleet of the Norwegian owned company. Boudicca was built in 1973 and for many years served as Royal Viking Star as part of a trio of German built sisters for Royal Viking Line. The 205m long vessel underwent her last major refit in 2006.

Boudicca will remain berthed in Dublin's Alexandra Basin until she sets sail later this afternoon for the short overnight cruise-leg to Liverpool.

Last year Dublin Port handled 88 cruisecalls and this number of cruise-callers is to be closely repeated in 2011. Overall there will be over 200 cruise calls with around half a million passengers and crew scheduled to visit ports and anchorage locations throughout the island of Ireland. The cruise sector business is estimated to generate €60m to both the northern and southern economies.

Published in Cruise Liners

The latest figures announced by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO) has revealed that the volume of goods passing through Irish ports increased across all the main shipping segments during the 3rd quarter of 2010 compared to the same period last year.

Exports of container were up 12%, roll-on/roll-off volumes on Ireland – UK routes is up 3%, dry bulk volumes up 40%, and liquid bulk up 19%.

Containersized traffic shipped through ROI ports recorded a quarter-on-quarter volume growth for the 3rd quarter 2010 up 4% to 218,377 twenty equivalent units (TEU). This was primarily as a result of strong export demand, which rose by 12% in the last quarter.

This sector is characterized by export traffic to USA and Asia largely influenced by the multinational chemical and pharmaceutical industries and also established indigenous Irish exporting companies. The other factor contributing to the aggregate rise was the increase in container imports during this period. This was also the first quarter-on-quarter growth in import volumes since the beginning of 2009.

Roll-on/roll-off (ro/ro) traffic to the UK from ROI ports continued to make a steady recovery up 3% for the 3rd quarter which is consistent with overall figures for the 9 months from Jan – Sept period which is up 3%, to 568,833 units. The ro/ro segment is largely weighted towards services to and from the UK which remains our largest trading partner.

In the dry bulk trade, traffic through all Irish Ports continued to recover some of the large volume losses experienced in 2009 and is up 40% for the 3rd quarter compared to the same period last year and 26% for the first 9 months of 2010. Part of the rise is attributed to strong global demand for ore and mineral products such as alumina, while domestic demand in the agricultural sector experienced a rise in imports of grains, feeds and fertilizers. While the overall picture is positive; the main volume gains are distributed to the larger ports with some of the smaller regional ports still in negative territory.

Break bulk volumes of construction related products fell again in the third quarter, bringing the total decline for the third quarter to -10%. Between 2008 and 2010 over 700,000 tonnes of break bulk commodities have been lost from the market. Importantly the fall off in volumes has not slowed in 2010 with an average quarterly drop of 10%.

Liquid bulk volume rose in Q3 by 19% year-on-year. However overall volumes for the first 9 months of the year remain unchanged.

The outlook for the remainder of the year suggests that some volume recovery in the main market segments will be achieved this year. However the total volume in many segments are still running at 35% less than 2007 volumes. Many shipping operators also comment that while export volumes have remained resilient over this period, there are few new companies emerging in the export market. Otherwise there are concerns about the impact of austerity measures in the Euro zone and at home.

Source: Glenn Murphy, Director of the IMDO. For more about the IMDO logon here.

Published in Ports & Shipping

The Irish ports and shipping sectors began to show positive signs of recovery towards the last quarter of 2009 following a record fall in volumes earlier in the year as the downturn in the economy bit hardest, according to the latest edition of the Irish Maritime Transport Economist, unveiled today (April 20th ) at an industry briefing in Dublin by the Irish Maritime Development Office (IMDO).


“While the trend for 2009 was negative, we observed that the pace of decline in economic activity moderated significantly from last spring onwards with some volume recovery in several of our domestic shipping segments recorded to the year end,” said IMDO Director, Mr. Glenn Murphy. “The market segments most heavily hit were those related to the construction industry, which suffered severe difficulties in 2009. This resulted in break-bulk volumes in commodities such as timber, aggregates, steel and plaster falling by as much as 49% to pre-boom levels.”


The report highlighted the continued contraction of the Irish economy last year and underlying weaker consumer confidence as the cause of a realignment of demand for shipping volumes across all the key market segments. This resulted in bulk volumes falling to levels last seen in 1995. Unitized segments also saw almost 5 years of volume growth dissipate over the course of 18 months, with lift on/lift off (lo/lo) falling back to 2003 levels and roll on/roll off (ro/ro) back to 2005 levels. The report also suggests that the oversupply of residential property, especially in parts of the country where demand is likely to remain weak for many years, will result in continued low shipping volumes for construction materials.


The lo/lo sector has similarly been a market segment enjoying long periods of double digit volume growth during the consumer driven boom time. This is mainly due to the segment being heavily weighted towards import laden volumes. Lo/lo volumes fell by 21 per cent on an all-island basis last year as consumer spending corrected sharply. The other main market segment, ro/ro, is traditionally heavily weighted towards volume movements to the United Kingdom. Ro/ro volumes fell by 9 per cent as underlying economic and currency issues in both markets continued to dampen demand. Both the lo/lo and ro/ro markets last year continued to undergo significant structural, route and capacity changes as the operators were challenged with having to adapt to rapidly evolving volume patterns and trade adjustments. Ferry passenger volumes remained static with no loss in passenger volumes reported for the year.


“It is largely recognized now that the return to positive economic growth will be export led and as such, the initial stages of our recovery will be mainly influenced by a recovery in the global economy and in particular, by our major trading partners,” said Mr. Jim Power, Chief Economist from Friends First at the event. “


The latest data in the report indicates that we may have passed the trough of the economic downturn that has impacted on shipping volumes, ongoing caveats of currency volatility and steadily increasing oil and bunker prices remain further risks to the recovery process. The Report concludes that, while market conditions remain challenging for many shipping operators, IMDO expect a modest return to volume growth towards the end of 2010.

Published in Ports & Shipping
Tagged under
28th September 2009

Irish Ports

This is a list of seaports around the coast of the island of Ireland.

EAST COAST

Arklow – Port of Arklow

BelfastPort of Belfast (Northern Ireland)

DroghedaDrogheda Port

DublinDublin Port Company

DundalkDundalk Port Company

Dun LaoghaireDun Laoghaire Harbour Company

Greenore – Port of Greenore

HowthHowth Harbour

LarnePort of Larne (Northern Ireland)

RosslareRosslare Europort

WarrenpointWarrenpoint Harbour Authority (Northern Ireland)

Wicklow

NORTH COAST

Coleraine (Northern Ireland)

LondonderryLondonderry Port and Harbour (Northern Ireland)

WEST COAST

Ballina – Port of Ballina

Bantry Bay

Dingle

Fenit

Foynes

Galway

Killybegs

Kilronan

Limerick

Sligo 

SOUTH COAST

Castletownbere

Cobh

Cork

Dungarvan

Dunmore East

Kinsale

New Ross

Port of Waterford

Ringaskiddy

Tivoli

Youghal

Published in Irish Ports
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