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Displaying items by tag: Electric Boats

The Swedish tech company Candela has racked up more than 60 orders for its revolutionary, €290,000 electric boat, the Candela C-8. That makes the flying C-8 one of the fastest-selling 28-foot boats on the market.

The Candela C-8 is the next-generation electric boat from the Swedish tech firm Candela. Using a new version of the company’s patented hydrofoil system, C-8 flies above the waves with greater range than any other electric boat, powered by a new, silent pod thruster – the Candela C-POD.

Compared to the company’s first model, the smaller and hand-built C-7, the C-8 is made for rapid mass production which allows Candela to sell it for a price that is in line with conventional premium, fossil-fuel boats.

Five weeks after launching the C-8, Candela has more than 60 orders for it, which makes the novel electric powerboat one of the best-selling 28-foot premium boats in Europe.

According to the firm's data, the C-8 is the second or third fastest-selling powerboat in the 28-foot category in Scandinavia. Not just electric boats, but any type of power source. By year's end, we expect to have a real impact on combustion engine boat sales in this size category, says Mikael Mahlberg, Candela’s Communications Manager.

First long-range electric boat - intended for mass production

Candela’s first boat – the open Candela C-7 – was a sales success in its own right, but still a niche product. With 30 units delivered since production started in 2019, C-7 led premium electric boat sales in Europe on account of having longer range, higher cruise speed and smoother ride than other electric boats, thanks to the company’s hydrofoil tech that lifts the hull above the water friction and allows for long-range on battery power only.

Candela C-8 is a far bigger and more capable boat that will offer new features not found in other boats. Flying on computer-controlled hydrofoils that lift the hull above the waves and reduce energy consumption by 80% compared to traditional powerboats, the C-8 can cruise for more than 2,5 hours at 20 knots. The hydrofoils also reduce slamming by 90% compared to conventional hull boats.

  • The C-8 will not just have longer range than other electric boats, it will offer a better ride experience than any boat out there. In 3-4-foot chop, you’ll be able to drive at 30 knots without feeling the waves. It will be like a magic carpet ride, says Mikael Mahlberg.
  • The real game-changer is Candela’s new boat motor - the Candela C-POD. By putting the electric motors in a torpedo-shaped pod under the water, Candela gets rid of mechanical gears and the associated noise. Shifting to electric direct-drive also reduces the number of moving parts, making the Candela C-POD more efficient, and virtually maintenance-free. With 3 000 hours between overhauls, the Candela C-POD will last a human lifetime without maintenance.
  • The C-8 will be the first truly silent, fast motorboat. There’s no slamming, no noise from the transmission. You’ll be able to cruise along at 24 knots, with only the sounds of wind whistling past the windscreen, says Mikael Mahlberg.

First fully integrated boat

Candela’s 25-strong engineering team consists of experts in hydrodynamics, software, advanced computer simulations, mechatronics and electric propulsions systems, among other fields.

All software and most hardware – including the Candela C-POD motor and Flight controller that controls the foils in-flight - are designed in-house. Candela C-8 is a fully integrated boat, offering a seamless user experience. Gone are the myriads of physical buttons and knobs found in conventional boats. All features, from foil retraction to route planning, are managed by the 15,4-inch panoramic touch screen, which is running Candela’s intuitive User Interface. Boaters can also manage and monitor charging, route planning, heating etc from the Candela app. 

Foilborne without compromise

Thanks to the hydrofoils – two underwater wings – that lift the hull above the water friction, Candela C-8 can run for considerably longer distances than other electric, fast boats. At a cruise speed of 22 knots, the C-8 will cover more than 50 nautical miles (92 km) on one charge of its 45-kWh battery.

When foilborne, the C-8’s on-board computer, called the Flight Controller, adjusts and twists the hydrofoil about 100 times per second to maintain the best flight height and to counteract waves and side wind. This allows for an artificially stable ride, free from the slamming and pitching common in conventional motor boats.

In very rough seas that prevent hydrofoiling, the C-8 can also be driven as a conventional boat, albeit with reduced range. By pushing a button on the touch screen, the hydrofoils will retract into the hull. This feature is also useful when entering a shallow harbor, or when storing the boat on a trailer. When driving in Shallow Mode, the C-POD motor and C-Foil are retracted and fully protected from both fouling and hitting submerged objects.

Deliveries begin in 2022

The first Candela C-8 boat is being assembled in Candela’s Lidingö, Stockholm factory during December. First deliveries will start during spring 2022.

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Candela the Swedish electric boat maker is aiming to bring electric boats to high-volume production but for now the cost of the new electric range remains high with the costs of its new C8 range estimated to be €295,000 for the eight-metre boat.

The C-8 has a top speed of 30 knots and a range of 50 nautical miles. 

Building on its first, successful sports craft, the Candela C-7, the Swedish tech company is now launching its second-generation hydrofoiling leisure boat: the Candela C-8, a larger and more comfortable craft designed to bring electric boats to the wider market.

- With the C-7, we demonstrated that our hydrofoil technology not only allows for long range on electricity, but also provides a better experience than conventional boats. In a hydrofoil boat, you get a smoother, nicer ride. However, the C-7 was more like a hand-built sports car; never intended for volume production, says Gustav Hasselskog, Candela’s founder and CEO.

- With the new C-8, we’re pushing the technology to the next level, and at the same time focusing on making a boat that has all the comfort you would expect, while designing it for efficient mass production.

At 8,5 metres length, the C-8 features all the amenities anticipated in a premium cruiser: A large, comfortable cockpit with seating for eight persons, a big sunbed, a spacious front cabin equipped with beds for two adults and two kids, and a marine toilet.

99% cheaper to own

At 290 000 euros excluding VAT, the C-8’s asking price is on par or lower than many conventional fossil fuel powerboats in the 28-29-foot range.

However, once purchased, the C-8 is virtually free to own and use. Thanks to the company’s efficient hydrofoil system, the cost of driving Candela C-8 is 95% lower than for combustion engine boats.

Equipped with the newly launched Candela C-POD direct-drive pod motor, the C-8 requires neither oil changes nor regular maintenance. The C-Pod is rated for 3 000 hours service-free use, which is the equivalent to 50-100 years of recreational boating – without any maintenance whatsoever.

Candela C-POD direct-drive pod motorThe Candela C-POD direct-drive pod motor

When moored, the C-8’s hydrofoils can be retracted above the waterline, minimizing growth and the need for antifouling.

- It’s basically free boating, and hassle-free boating, for the first time in history, says Gustav Hasselskog.

Longest electric range ever

The C-8 features a new and improved version of Candela’s revolutionary hydrofoiling technology that cuts energy consumption by 80 % compared to conventional boats, thereby allowing long all-electric range at high speeds.

Combined with Candela’s newly developed drive train, the C-POD, the C-8 can cruise for longer distances than any electric powerboat before it: over 50 nautical miles on battery power at a speed of 22 knots. The C-POD makes the C-8 the most efficient powerboat ever. At a speed of 22 knots, it only draws 16 kW/21 hp from the battery. For comparison, a conventional, planing, 28-foot cabin cruiser is typically equipped with a 300-horsepower gasoline outboard motor.

Elevated driving

Candela C-8 is designed to be the first totally silent motorboat. Unlike other motorboats, there’s no transmission noise and no sound from waves hitting the hull. Only the faint whisper of the wind will remind you that you’re cruising at a speed of 30 knots.

The C-8’s Flight controller automatically and instantly adjust the foils to keep the boat level and steady, even in adverse weather conditions. In an industry-first for leisure boats, the C-8 is equipped with true fly-by-wire steering and has Autopilot features for more relaxed driving over long distances. When the driver lets go of the wheel, the boat will automatically steer the set compass course. More features will follow as the C-8, like every Candela, is upgradeable Over-The-Air.

Candela C8 cockpitCandela C8 cockpit

- With all learnings from C-7, a new, even more efficient foil system has been developed for C-8. A planing boat has a lift to drag ratio of 4, a seagull is at 10 and an albatross, with its long sleek wings at 20. C-7 reached 15. With quite some re-thinking, C-8 ended up at 17, making it the most efficient boat ever.

- Maybe even more important, we put a lot of effort into understanding how to translate the feeling of a very tight driving experience into mechanics, electronics and software. To shorten the system’s reaction times we developed our own height sensors. Also, we have taken out the mechanical play of the entire system. In terms of driving experience, it is a world of a difference – the boat reacts to changes in the steering wheel within a split second.

- Take-off is where we use the most energy, so equipping a foiling boat with a really good planing hull actually makes sense. I think we have pushed the hull performance as far as is possible, says Gustav Hasselskog.

The Candela engineering team has also spent considerable effort on optimizing the C-8’s hull. Using advanced CFD, the C-8’s stepped hull is designed to use very little energy from standstill up until 16 knots, which is when the boat becomes foilborne.

Fully integrated experience

The Swedish tech company employs 25+ engineers from various fields, such as mechanical engineering, control systems, machine learning, software, electronic engineering and hydrodynamic design.

All sub-systems and software in C-8 are developed in house, making for a seamless human-machine interaction.

All settings – from turning on the cooler to navigation – are controlled from the 15,4” inch screen running Candela’s proprietary user interface. The Candela app lets the owner control the boat’s various systems from ashore.

"Making an integrated user experience was really important for us. We don’t rely on third party suppliers for software and we make most hardware ourselves. This may be the iPhone moment for boats," says Gustav Hasselskog.

Boosted by large investments from the TED foundation’s Chris Anderson among others, Candela has been able to scale up R&D at an exponential rate over the past two years. The C-8 project was initiated to finally bring electric boats to the masses.

Combining a price that is on par with fossil fuel boats with the benefits of electric hydrofoiling - superior seakeeping, total silence, very low operating costs, zero maintenance and a seamless user experience – Candela is expecting C-8 to be the first electric boat that will outsell fossil fuel competitors by a wide margin.

"We believe we will make several thousand Candela C-8’s over the coming years", says Gustav Hasselskog. Once you have tried it, you realise that this is the way boats must look like in the future.

Candela C-8 production starts this autumn at the company’s Stockholm factory, and the first customers will take delivery during spring 2022.

C-8 Facts

  • Length 8,5 meters
  • Beam 2,5 meters
  • Speed 22-24 knots cruising, 30 knots max
  • Battery 44 kWh lithium ion
  • Range 50+ nautical miles
  • Motor Candela C-POD, 55 kW
  • Max take-off load 815 kg
  • Draft 0,5 m in shallow mode (foils retracted)
  • 0,8 m while foiling
  • Charging time 2 hours, with 3-phase charging
  • Accommodation Sleeps 2 adults, 2 children, seats for 6+2 people
  • Selected options
  • Cooler
  • Fresh Water shower
  • Marine toilet with septic tank
  • Underwater LED lights for foil illumination
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American Father and son team David and Alex Borton have completed what they believe to be the first-ever solar-electric voyage from Bellingham, Washington, to Juneau, Alaska.

The duo undertook the journey in their 27ft wooden hull solar-powered boat, Wayward Sun.

Wayward Sun, built by Devlin Boat in Olympia, WA, is propelled by a Torqeedo Cruise 4.0 electric pod drive with six Torqeedo Power 24-3500 lithium batteries.

The electric boat is powered 100 per cent by solar energy with no fossil-fuel combustion engine at all on board. “People always ask us if we have any gas or diesel back up,” said Alex Borton, “but the sun rises every day. If our batteries get too low, we just wait.”

There is a separate 12-volt system for lights, electronics and other DC-powered systems and an inverter for occasional AC loads, like making waffles. The batteries are charged from a 1700-Watt array of solar cells on the boat’s rooftop.

“Most electric boats on the market today are limited by their battery capacity, which means they have to return to shore power to charge,” explained Borton. “Until recently, solar panels and batteries were just not capable of severing the tie to shore power, so it was only functional for extending range or for partial charging. But now, thanks to advances in solar cells and Torqeedo’s efficient electric drives and high-capacity batteries, it’s possible to produce a solar boat with reasonable speeds and accommodation that can continuously cruise without ever charging from the shore. If I had more time I would keep going for another 1,000 miles.”

The duo departed on Tuesday, 25 May, in their 27ft wooden hull solar boat Wayward Sun and made landfall at Ketchikan, Alaska, 13 June, then continued up the coast at a more leisurely pace to Glacier Bay and Juneau, concluding the voyage on 8 July. The team documented their preparations and voyage in their blog

“The solar-electric system has more than exceeded our expectations,” said Alex Borton. “During the 45-day passage from Bellingham to Glacier Bay to Juneau, we were underway for 38 days. We averaged 32 nautical miles per day at an average speed of 3.7 knots. While some days we stopped early or left late because of weather, there were only two full days we didn’t travel at all due to high winds or dense fog.

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The flying Candela C-7 has won the most prestigious electric speedboat race in Monaco. By beating conventional electric boats that pack ten times more power, the ultra-efficient C-7 showed why future boats will be foiling, its makers claim.

Candela C-7 is the first hydrofoiling electric boat in serial production. It is also the best-selling electric premium boat in Europe and has since its introduction in 2019 won several awards for the innovative technology that allows it to fly above the surface, using 80% less energy than conventional boats.

Competing in Friday's YCM International Speed Record race during the Monaco Energy Challenge, the world’s biggest competition for electric and new energy boats hosted by the Monaco Yacht Club, the Swedish-made C-7 beat 14 other electric boats in the 1/8 nautical mile sprint race. Averaging 27, 055 knots, the Candela C-7 flew past the finishing line at a speed exceeding 31 knots, despite rough weather and big waves.

The C-7 has more in common with an aircraft than a boat. The control system resembles that of a modern jet fighter, like the F-16. As a driver, you just steer and control the speed, everything else is handled by the computer, said MahlbergThe C-7 has more in common with an aircraft than a boat. The control system resembles that of a modern jet fighter, like the F-16. As a driver, you just steer and control the speed, everything else is handled by the computer

Even more impressive, the ultra-efficient C-7 beat conventional hulled electric powerboats equipped with ten times bigger motors - showing why hydrofoiling is the future for powerboats.

The 25-foot Candela C-7 needs only 25 hp to cruise at a speed of 20 knots. Maxing out at 87 hp during take-off, its electric motor is tiny compared to the engines fitted to conventional, planing powerboats of the same size. Due to high hydrodynamic drag, planing craft usually need several hundred horsepowers to reach high speeds.

  • This is a big day for electric boating. We wanted to show that instead of just fitting bigger motors and more batteries into conventional, inefficient hulls, hydrofoils allow you to use less power to reach higher speeds and get long range. That’s how we can make boating truly sustainable, said Candela's Mikael Mahlberg after the race.
  • By flying above the water, you also get a smoother ride in choppy weather, Mahlberg added.
  • The C-7 has more in common with an aircraft than a boat. The control system resembles that of a modern jet fighter, like the F-16. As a driver, you just steer and control the speed, everything else is handled by the computer, said Mahlberg.

The C-7 is equipped with Candela’s sophisticated on-board computer, the Flight controller, which automatically adjusts the hydrofoil 100 times per second to account for side wind, waves and different loads. Receiving input from several different sensors, the Flight controller computes the foil’s optimum angle of attack to ensure a smooth ride.

Candela’s hydrofoil system – with two underwater wings that can be retracted for easy storage when trailing the boat or entering shallow ports – is now being leveraged for bigger electric boats. Next year, Candela will launch the P-30 electric foiling ferry for the city of Stockholm, as well as a 12-person water taxi, called the Candela P-12

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Swedish tech company Candela has showcased its electric hydrofoiling Candela C-7 through the waterways of Venice and says its wake-free design could save Venice from moto ondoso or wake damage.

As Afloat reported previously, waves caused by speedboats have become a genuine threat to the residents and buildings of Venice. The wake of the myriad taxi boats, water ambulances and police boats needed for transport in Venice erode the wooden pillars on which the city’s iconic houses stand. 

According to the manufacturer, the Candela C-7 is the first speedboat that doesn’t create wake. ‘Flying’ above the water’s surface at high speeds, the company says hydrofoiling is the future for waterborne transportation.

Candela is currently working on the P-12 water taxi and the P-30 electric ferry, the latter has been purchased by Swedish authorities for public transport use in Candela’s hometown of Stockholm.

In a report by Reuters, Candela’s Maria Rohman says: “The boat has five sensors that read the water and speak to the computer system in the boat and the computer system tells the foils to move and they move 100 times a second, back and forth and diagonal to keep the boat stable. So when you are up flying it takes off at about 15 knots.”

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RS Electric Boats will present their latest generation of electric RIB, the Pulse 63, for the first time at The Green Tech Boat Show 2021 hosted by MDL Marinas at Queen Anne's Battery, Plymouth, 19-20 June 2021.

The world's first electric RIB with a fully integrated electric drive, the Pulse is designed to help individuals switch to a more environmentally friendly way of getting out on the water. With zero emissions, no unpleasant fumes and no risk of oil spills, the Pulse 63 promotes clean boating, and the dynamic and efficient electric propulsion is extremely quiet with minimal wake for discrete operations and a comfortable ride. The electric RIB is also built using sustainable and recycled materials and constructed on British soil to reduce shipping miles.

The Pulse 63 will be presented by the recently appointed RS Electric Boats Commercial Sales Manager, Andy Andrews. Andy brings a wealth of commercial RIB experience and knowledge to the team, including 25 years in the Royal Navy, time working for Oman Sail, Saphire Marine, Berthon, and Gemini Marine, and supplying boats, engines, marine equipment and maritime training courses to UN and Government agencies throughout East Africa.

"We are really looking forward to inviting interested parties to view the new Pulse 63 for the first time at The Green Tech Boat Show," says Andy Andrews. "With zero emissions propulsion, the Pulse 63 provides a unique opportunity for marine-based companies to meet sustainability targets and move towards a greener future. We expect the RIB to appeal to a wide range of organisations, including law enforcement, border protection, security, wind farms, harbour masters, sailing schools and marinas, to name just a few. We also offer leisure and superyacht configurations for private boat owners wanting to reduce their carbon footprint and enjoy time on the water in a way that doesn't harm the planet."

The RS Electric Boats Pulse 63 will be available to view at The Green Tech Boat Show, Queen Anne's battery, Plymouth, 19-20 June 2021 on Stand 21.

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Candela P-30 is an electric ferry that builds on Candela's technology developed for the leisure boats model C-7.

“Moto Ondoso” - wake damage - from thousands of motorboats is slowly eroding the iconic buildings of Venice. A Swedish-designed electric boat that flies above the water might be the answer to the city’s problems.

Venice faces a difficult choice between using fast motorboats on the canals and protecting the city’s iconic cultural heritage. Venice has a unique traffic system where the primary means of transportation is boats. This, however, does not exempt the city from traffic-related noise pollution and congestion. Unique to Venice, though, is ”Moto Ondoso”, wake pollution, which has already caused damage to 60% of the city’s buildings, according to one study.

The greatest culprits are water taxis and tourist boats. As they pass through the narrow canals, they generate wake which washes against canal walls and foundations with great energy, speeding up erosion and eventually leading to building collapse.

Most motorboat engines lack the sophisticated catalytic converters found in cars, and therefore spew out nitrogen oxides and particulate matter. The acid nature of the pollution is thought to be speeding up the erosion of the city's medieval buildings, which are already sinking into the lagoon – a process hastened by the constant currents caused by the large number of vessels passing through the canals.

During the past year, Venice’s usually dark waterways have turned noticeably clearer because of the absence of motorboat traffic.

And hopefully, they can stay clear – or at least this is the vision laid forth by Candela, a Swedish tech company that will demonstrate their flying electric boats during the Salone di Nautica in Venice, starting on May 29.

Candela’s boats run on hydrofoils, computer-controlled underwater wings, that lift the hull above the water and decrease water friction by 80 percent compared to conventional taxi boats. Using very little energy and traveling silently, Candela’s leisure boat C-7 produces a wake that is less than 5 cm high – or about the size of wake generated by Venice’s traditional rowing boats.

Candela C-7 is the world's first electric hydrofoil boat - and will be available for test drives in Venice, May 29- June 6.Candela C-7 is the world's first electric hydrofoil boat - and will be available for test drives in Venice, May 29- June 6.

Hydrofoils are the next-generation technology for motorboats. They allow you to go fast on battery power without wake, noise or slamming, says Erik Eklund, Director of Public Transport at Candela.

The hydrofoils give the C-7 several advantages not found in other boats, be it electric or combustion engine craft.

C-7 can cruise at high speeds for well over 2 hours at a speed of 20 knots, far longer than any other electric boat. The boat flies over choppy waves rather than pounding through them, resulting in superior comfort for its passengers.

With C-7, we wanted to build the first no-compromise electric boat. It can go fast and far, like combustion engine boats. But it’s also totally silent, much smoother to ride in, fun to drive, doesn’t create wake and is very economical to drive – it’s about 99 per cent cheaper to operate than a gasoline boat of the same size, says Erik Eklund.

Just like a modern aeroplane, the C-7’s hydrofoils are controlled by computers that adjust the angle of attack continuously. The foil moves 100 times per second to balance the boat, resulting in an artificially stable ride even in strong winds and bigger waves.

Building on their leisure boat technology, Candela is also developing a bigger, passenger boat which is called the P-30 (pictured on top). This 30 passenger commuter ship is currently under construction in Stockholm, where it will run in commercial traffic from 2023 and onwards.

Imagine a future Venice where waterborne transport is not only emission-free, silent, and doesn’t damage the city’s iconic buildings, but also very cheap to operate and can provide a new, fantastic experience for tourists and locals alike. That’s what we hope to accomplish with P-30, says Erik Eklund.

We will show that electric boats can be far better than the fossil fuel competitors – but still be kind to nature, says Erik Eklund.

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Nominations are now being accepted for The Gustave Trouvé Awards for Excellence in Electric Boats and Boating, the international electric boat awards started last year by electric boat website Plugboats.com

Nominations are being accepted in four categories:

  • Electric Boats Under 8 metres/26 feet
  • Electric Boats Over 8m/26 ft
  • Electric Boats Designed for Paying Passengers
  • Customized / DIY Electric Boats

Members of the public as well as manufacturers and others in the marine industry are welcome to nominate any electric boat and can find the qualifying criteria and nomination form here 

The awards were created to recognise the inventors, designers, manufacturers, entrepreneurs and visionaries who are making advances every day to develop clean, quiet, zero emission technologies and designs to reduce reliance on fossil fuel for marine propulsion.

They are named to honour Gustave Trouvé, a prolific French inventor with over 75 patents to his name who was awarded the Légion d’Honneur in 1882. Among his innovations was the world’s first outboard boat motor, which he devised so that he could detach the motor from his prototype electric boat ‘Le Teléphone’ and take it home to work on in his Paris apartment.

While M. Trouvé’s invention predates the 1887 patent of the internal combustion engine, and electric boats have been available since the first years of the 20th century, it is not until recently that they have begun to enter the mainstream. Analysis from Research and Markets in February of 2020* estimates that the global market was worth US$ 4.49 Bn in 2018, and is expected to grow to US$ 12.32 Bn by 2027.

‘The Gussies’, as the awards are known in the electric boat world, are the only international boating awards that focus exclusively on electric boats and boating. The 2020 awards had 50 boats nominated from 19 countries with the winning boats hailing from France, Singapore and India.

Winners are selected through a combination of online public voting and weighted voting by a panel of industry experts from: the Electric Boat Associations of the UK, USA, Greece, Canada and Switzerland; the Alternate Fuels Committee of Inland Waterways International; and the Venice 2028 organization and e-Regatta. Online voting is hosted on the plugboats.com site.

“The first year of The Gussies saw over 10,000 votes from electric boat enthusiasts all over the world” said Jeff Butler, Editor/Publisher of Plugboats and Founder of the awards “and with interest in electric propulsion growing literally by the day, I expect many many more this year.”

The opening of nominations, May 26, is the 140th anniversary of Gustave Trouvé’s first trip down the Seine River in his electric boat in 1881. Nominations for The Gussies close on June 15 and voting will begin the next day – June 16 – to select which 6 boats in each of the 4 categories will move on to the finals. Finals voting will begin July 6 to decide the winners, announced on the 118th anniversary of Trouve’s death in 1902: July 27.

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The ‘game changer’ Pulse58 was officially launched at boot Düsseldorf yesterday (Sunday 19 January), and RS joint chief executives Alex Newton Southon and Jon Partridge spoke passionately about the vision for this project and what they have planned for the future.

“We are so proud and excited to have brought the first 100% fully integrated electric production RIB to market — the response at the show has been overwhelmingly positive,” said Southon.

“We felt that it was time for change and to challenge habits, from the conversations we’ve been having around the Pulse58 its so apparent we’re not the only people that think it’s important.”

During the launch, Southon, who is technical CEO of RS, talked through the innovative technology used for the 100% electronic RIB and the hydrodynamic design as previously outlined on Afloat.ie.

From initial design, manufacturing and distribution, RS says the Pulse58 is the product of two years of development and has been packed full of sustainable credentials that compliment its zero-emissions propulsion.

RS Electric Boats Pulse58 1

This is only the beginning for the sister brand of RS Sailing, with a Pulse42 currently in development and talk of a commercial workboat and superyacht tenders showing the electric is not just limited to the leisure and coaching market.

South went on to thank RAD Propulsion, Hyperdrive, Hypermotive, Jo Richards, Clive Johnson, Raymarine, Marine360 and Tree Aid for all their work in the project.

Partridge added: “RS was born 25 years ago with the dream of changing how people race and enjoy small boats. Our motivations and dreams haven’t changed.

“With the Pulse58 we want people to enjoy the water in a completely new way — we want to reduce the amount of pollution in our waters and enjoy our playing field for a lot longer to come.”

Alongside the launch, RSelectricboats.com has gone live where you can find further information about the Pulse58, the technology behind it and ways to get in touch.

Published in Boot Düsseldorf
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boot Düsseldorf, the International Boat Show

With almost 250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair and every year in January the “meeting place" for the entire industry. Around 2,000 exhibitors present their interesting new products, attractive further developments and maritime equipment. This means that the complete market will be on site in Düsseldorf and will be inviting visitors on nine days of the fair to an exciting journey through the entire world of water sports in 17 exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology, equipment and accessories, services, canoes, kayaks, kitesurfing, rowing, diving, surfing, wakeboarding, windsurfing, SUP, fishing, maritime art, marinas, water sports facilities as well as beach resorts and charter, there is something for every water sports enthusiast.

boot Düsseldorf FAQs

boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair. Seventeen exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology.

The Fairground Düsseldorf. This massive Dusseldorf Exhibition Centre is strategically located between the River Rhine and the airport. It's about 20 minutes from the airport and 20 minutes from the city centre.

250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair.

The 2018 show was the golden jubilee of the show, so 2021 will be the 51st show.

Every year in January. In 2021 it will be 23-31 January.

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH Messeplatz 40474 Düsseldorf Tel: +49 211 4560-01 Fax: +49 211 4560-668

The Irish marine trade has witnessed increasing numbers of Irish attendees at boot over the last few years as the 17-Hall show becomes more and more dominant in the European market and direct flights from Dublin offer the possibility of day trips to the river Rhine venue.

Boats & Yachts Engines, Engine parts Yacht Equipment Watersports Services Canoes, Kayaks, Rowing Waterski, Wakeboard, Kneeboard & Skimboard Jetski + Equipment & Services Diving, Surfing, Windsurfing, Kite Surfing & SUP Angling Maritime Art & Crafts Marinas & Watersports Infrastructure Beach Resorts Organisations, Authorities & Clubs

Over 1000 boats are on display.

©Afloat 2020

At A Glance – Boot Dusseldorf 

Organiser
Messe Düsseldorf GmbH
Messeplatz
40474 Düsseldorf
Tel: +49 211 4560-01
Fax: +49 211 4560-668
Web: https://www.boot.com/

The first boats and yachts will once again be arriving in December via the Rhine.

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