Menu

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

Displaying items by tag: Poolbeg

As Ireland braces itself for stormy conditions next week, photographer John Coveney captured waves breaking over the Great South Wall at Poolbeg on Dublin Bay during yesterday's Southeasterly Gale. 

Met Eireann say South to southwest winds will continue to occasionally reach gale force 8 for a time this morning on Irish Coastal waters from Erris Head to Bloody Foreland to Fair Head.
The outlook for a further 24 hours until 0600, Sunday is for moderate to fresh west or southwest winds becoming southwesterly everywhere on Saturday afternoon. Winds veering west to northwest on south and west coasts late Saturday and early Sunday. 

Published in Dublin Bay
Tagged under

#thisislandnation – We don't make enough use of the rivers which flow through our cities. These ribbons of life to our major urban centres pass through the heart of the cities where the pressure of traffic and pedestrians shows more interest in the speed with which they can be crossed, often seeming to regard them as unwelcome blocks which require bridges, rather than appreciate that underneath those bridges is a system of transport and leisure which is neglected and often used by citizens for dumping of their waste.

There are some moves to utilise them more efficiently. On the Liffey there is a sightseeing tourist vessel and Poolbeg maintains its sailing presence close to the shipping sector. In Cork a voluntary organisation, Meitheal Mara, has promoted boating on the many different strands into which the city forces the Lee to pass through. Cork's city-based shipping operations have been diminished by the port which wants to end them altogether and move commercial shipping to Ringaskiddy where its public presence will be more limited and removed from the public eye. Waterford has based a marina in the city centre, but shunted its shipping to Belview where it is practically unseen by the public, so that the contribution of shipping to the economy is not perceived as strongly as it should be. Galway is a restricted tidal port, but a new one is planned and close enough to be seen by citizens. Dublin maintains port operations close to the city.

DOCKER IN DUBLIN PORT

Dublin Port docker from the North Lotts book

There was a time when the ports and the rivers throbbed with life. In Dublin Guinness barges traversed the Liffey and there were real characters on the docks in all of our cities. Life could be tough as a dock labourer, but there was a great pride in the communities which lived around the ports and recognised the importance of shipping.

The East Wall has always been a proud Dublin community with seafaring a vital part of its tradition. On my programme THIS ISLAND NATION I played a song from a CD which was presented to me. 'Songs from the North Lotts' by Paul O'Brien capture a time in East Wall which deserves to be remembered. The East Wall Residents' Association which has been in existence for some fifty years, "maintaining and promoting the rare and wonderful community that it is an always has been," led the production of the book of the songs, dedicated to the people of East Wall and North Wall.

The song I played was "Taking the Boat," about which Paul O'Brien wrote in a book accompanying his CDs in 2009: "When I was growing up Dublin people didn't emigrate, they 'took the boat'. Single or married, it didn't matter. I don't personally know of any Dublin family that has not been touched by emigration."

There was a great response to the song, which you can hear on the Afloat website by CLICKING HERE. It was so good that in the June edition of the monthly programme, I will be playing another ballad from the collection – "Me Handsome Stevedore."

Tune in to hear it – next Wednesday night, June 4 at 7.30 pm on Youghal Radio – Community Radio Youghal 104FM or on their website www.cry104fm.com or if you are in the Dublin area, tune in to NearFM 90.3 on Friday night, June 6 at 6 p.m. This is another station joining the "family of the sea."

There was an interesting comment on the May edition of the programme by Jim O'Donovan, Director of Environment and Recreation with Cork City Council, who compared the better environmental condition of the River Lee to the Liffey, particularly around Heuston Station, about which he was quite critical.

Click HERE to listen to him on the Afloat podcast of the programme.

MARINE COMMUNITY GROWING

WAITING FOR THE TIDE

Waiting for the tide at Youghal in County Cork

Community radio stations around the country are showing great interest in the marine sphere and counteracting neglect by national and local commercial radio. I met many of these voluntary broadcasters at the annual meeting of their national organisation, CRAOL, over the past weekend in Youghal. They have produced and broadcast programmes on a wide variety of marine topics. THIS ISLAND NATION, was amongst the winners in the annual CRAOL national awards, chosen by the broadcasters themselves. I am pleased that the description "this island nation" is heard being more widely used in general conversation, by the media, in politics and in business. Awareness of the marine sphere is growing.

WHELKS, BIRDS AND FISHING

I didn't know a lot about the Irish sea snail which is worth around €4m. a year in exports until I talked to Liam Kennedy from the Sea Fisheries Protection Authority who wants fishermen to protect them. I will be broadcasting that interview in the June edition of THIS ISLAND NATION radio next week, as well as an exclusive interview with the Head of the SFPA, Susan Steele. She tells me that she wants to see "a thriving fishing industry and thriving fishing communities," but warns that those who "lose the run of themselves" and engage in illegal fishing will be dealt with speedily and effectively because they damage the future of the fishing industry. I will also be talking to Birdwatch Ireland about the arrival, for the first time, of one of the world's rarest sea birds off the Irish coast.

BERMUDA PETREL

This is the Bermuda Petrel, an endangered species, of which there are only 108 breeding pairs known to exist.

WOMAN WITH CONFIDENCE

"We've never sailed in Cork before, but we're quite confident anyway." That's the view of the top woman match racing sailor, 32-year-old Camilla Ulrikkeholm from Denmark, who will be at the home of sailing, the Royal Cork YC in Crosshaven, for the ISAF Women's Match Racing World Championships will be staged there next week.

CAMILLA ULRIKKEHOLM

 Camilla Ulrikkeholm from Denmark

The event will start on Tuesday and continue until Sunday, sailed in the ISA J80s fleet. "We've done a lot of research about the venue, we know the boat very well and we're definitely as tuned together as a crew should be. We'll just handle it the same way we usually do - arrive early to spend a day finding out all the practical details, then do some practising and get to know the boat and work our way into the regatta by using the first matches to learn about the local conditions."

That's confidence !

SHIPPING RECOVERY UNLIKELY

The Chief Executive of A.P.Moeller-Maersk Company has indicated that there will not be a sustainable recovery in the shipping industry in the short term. Nils Andersen is quoted as saying that "there is lingering overcapacity" which may remain until 2017. The Irish Maritime Development Organisation in its Weekly Market Review says that "the idle containership fleet" has gone below two per cent of the overall fleet for the first time since last September, but the global tanker market is experiencing low rates with the crude sector suffering particularly and providing only very low earnings for owners. The European Short Sea Bulk market is also experiencing a downward trend which has been developing since April.

BALTIMORE MARITIME COURSES

Baltimore Maritime Centre was formed in December 2013 by a nucleus of members of Les Glénans, following the closure of the Glenans sail training base in the village. It has acquired six of that organisation's keel boats and will start sailing courses this Summer in conjunction with Heir Island Sailing Schull and Baltimore Yacht Charters.

Twitter: @TomMacSweeney and @Afloatmagazine

Published in Island Nation
A second drill-rig platform, the Pauline was positioned in Dublin Bay on Friday, to investigate suitable conditions for an outfall discharge pipe from the Ringsend wastewater treatment plant, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The work is part of a Dublin City Council project to evaluate an extension at the Ringsend plant where treated water will be released into the bay. The council are conducting detailed feasibility studies which will be examined for an Environmental Impact Assessment.

To date the project has involved two other rigs, the Aran 250 and the larger Excalibur which remains in the bay. The barges will be towed to 20 pre-determined bore-hole locations in the bay where the jack-up rig barges operate 'legs' to sit on the seabed which enables a steady working platform. The rigs are operating on a continuous basis in an area covering most of Dublin Bay and close to the Burford Bank on the eastern fringes.

In addition a buoy will be positioned 300-metres of the barge during drill operations, which is expected to take approximately one week for each drill. For information on the location of the bore-holes, they can viewed from the Dublin Port website by clicking HERE The project is expected to be completed in late Spring.

Several support craft are engaged in the project that recently included the Seabed Worker, a 3,923 gross tonnes Norwegian anchor-handling tug supply vessel (AHTS) the tugs Multratug 7, MTS Valiant and Trojan and the RIB-craft sisters, Brian Boru and James Joyce which are on standby duties. Like the Trojan, the 12-seater RIBS are based at the Poolbeg Yacht Club Marina where in the tourist season the craft provide excursions in Dublin Bay for Sea Safari Tours. In October the project also required the services of the yellow-hulled catamaran, Xplorer to carry out a bathymetric survey of Dublin Bay. The larger tugs and rigs are based opposite in Alexandra Basin / Ocean Pier.

The largest drill-rig working to date on the project, the Excalibur arrived under the tow of the Multratug 7 on a misty morning on Christmas Day. Due to the weather conditions the red-hulled craft slipped quietly into the port. Several days later the imposing looking craft re-emerged with its six-towering jack-up 'sea-legs' that jutted skywards into an otherwise horizontal expanse of Dublin Bay.

The sight of the rig has presented many onlookers to mistakenly believe the drilling was for oil!...Not so but the assumption is not surprising given the reports last year of an oil-field discovery named the Dalkey Island Prospect. The name for the oil-field was referred to Dalkey, as the coastal suburb on the southern shores is the nearest landfall to the exploratory well sites at the Kish Bank Basin.

In fact this kind of exploratory activity was again to confuse residents throughout the bay when the drill-ship, Fugro Synergy was offshore at the Kish Bank between December 2009 and early Spring of 2010. Though on this occasion the search was not for oil but coal!

During this period the 5,200 tonnes vessel equipped with a drill-tower, seemed to be a near permanent feature on the horizon. A series of drill-wells up to 3,500-metres were conducted when the 2009 built ship was contracted to Irish based VP Power Ltd, to determine the commercial viability of extracting coal from the sea for generating electricity. The Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) project is a process where coal is heated in underwater rock reservoirs to extract gas, essentially converting gas-from-coal energy. Otherwise this method is commonly referred to as a 'clean' technology.

In addition to last year's search for deposits of large coal seams under the seabed, there was reports of a significant natural resource in the form of oil!... when several exploratory blocks again in the Kish Bank Basin were surveyed. The company behind this venture, Provident Resources, another Irish based exploration company, conducted initial oil surveys using air-born craft and as such no actual drill-based ships or rigs were used. Though should any oil flow, such an operation would be required.

Incidentally the Excalibur is designed also to perform offshore wind turbine installation work and is equipped with a 250-ton crane to hoist the wind-farm components. The vessel is operated by Fugro Seacore, a subsidiary of the Dutch parent company, Fugro, which also managed the drill-ship Fugro Synergy.

Published in Dublin Bay

pic6.jpg

Brief History of Poolbeg area

Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club is adjacent to the Pigeon House coal burning electricity-generating station, which was officially closed in July 1976. It nestles at the foot of the towering twin stacks of the modern Poolbeg Power station, which replaced the Pigeon House in 1965. It is a site of considerable significance in the history of Irish technology close to the centre of Dublin.

There is an established walk close to the club. The South Wall of the Port of Dublin extends from Ringsend nearly four miles out into Dublin Bay. This is one of the longest sea-walls in Europe. The walk continues to the Half Moon bathing place. Further on is the landmark Poolbeg Lighthouse. The Poolbeg Lighthouse was built in 1768, but was re-designed and re-built into its present form in 1820.

Ringsend Village

There are different versions of the origin of the name Ringsend, but it is most probably derived from the Irish word Rinn meaning a point or spit of land jutting into the sea.

The area seems to have been relatively uninhabited up until the 1620s when a fishing station grew up around the end of a point jutting into the estuary among mudflats and salt marshes where the Liffey and Dodder met the sea.

A harbour was developed at Poolbeg and Ringsend replaced Dalkey as Dublin’s principal port.

From the mid-17th century hotels and lodging houses began to spring up to cater for the many sailors, soldiers, port officials and travellers passing through the area.

In 1654 the Chief Justice of Ireland, Henry Cromwell, ordered everyone of Irish blood to move two miles outside Dublin city and this led to the establishment of Irishtown.

By the turn of the century the population had increased significantly and a floating chapel was moored nearby to cater for the spiritual needs of the community. Work then began on St. Matthew’s church in Irishtown in the early 18th century, one of a number of ‘Mariners’ churches’ around Dublin Bay. Incidentally, the vaults of St. Matthew’s were reputedly used as a store for smuggled goods, smuggling being rife in the area during this period.

Throughout the 1700s travelling to and from Ringsend and Irishtown was risky, particularly after dark, as highwaymen and thieves roamed the surrounding countryside.

Press gangs also stalked the inns abducting people for the British Navy.

To make matters worse several bridges were swept away until the current granite structure was built after the flood of 1802 and the danger posed by the Dodder diminished after the construction of the reservoir at Glenasmole in 1868.

Fishing provided a good living for many, boat building, chemical works and other industries provided employment, and hot and cold seawater baths attracted day-trippers and longer-term visitors to Irishtown. Indeed Wolfe Tone often stayed in Irishtown to take a break from political activity.

The Great South Wall, including the Poolbeg lighthouse, was constructed throughout the 18th century to provide greater protection for vessels, and dredged soil from port improvements was used to form many streets on either side of the Liffey, the sites being apportioned by ‘lot’, hence the name South Lotts Road.

The Ballast Board was founded in 1786 to manage the port. This later became the Dublin Port and Docks Board, now called the Dublin Port Company Ltd.

The embankment of the quays was also completed during this period.

On the 23rd April 1796 a crowd of 60,000 people witnessed the opening of basins and sea-locks connecting the newly-built Grand Canal to the Liffey at Ringsend.

It was an astounding development, which equalled the entire Liverpool docks at the time and meant that Dublin was fast becoming the second port in Ireland and Britain.

However, an economic downturn followed the Act of Union in 1800 as restrictive tax laws were imposed. To compound matters, in 1818 the mail boats from Holyhead switched to Howth, later to a new terminal at Dún Laoghaire, while the Royal Dockyard was also removed.

The worst ravages of the 1845–47 famine were avoided in the Ringsend area due to the availability of fish and the importation of Indian corn by the local landlord, Sidney Herbert, and as the 19th century wore on the many industries such as glass and rope manufacturing, boatyards, mills and the new gasworks provided welcome employment.

In 1863 the Pembroke Township, consisting of Baggotrath, Donnybrook, Sandymount, Ringsend and Irishtown, was formed. Improvements in the following decades included a horse drawn tramline laid through the area in the early 1870s linking Nelson’s Pillar with the Martello Tower at Sandymount, and the construction of the sewage works in the 1880s. The Earl of Pembroke also provided funds for Ringsend Technical School, 1892, and the development of Pembroke Cottages, the first of a series of housing developments for workers, in 1893.

Around the turn of the century local Parish Priest Canon Mooney was a tireless worker on behalf of the local population, and was responsible for the rebuilding of St. Patrick’s church in the early 1900s.

During the 1916 Rising, Boland’s Mill on the Canal Docks was occupied by rebels under the command of de Valera. The flat complexes George Reynolds House and Whelan House are named for two local men who fought in the Rising, while O’Rahilly House is called after The O’Rahilly who was part of the GPO garrison.

In the 1930s the Pembroke Township was incorporated into Dublin city. Many changes have taken place in the intervening years including construction of new housing and the East Link Bridge, and the upgrading of Shelbourne Park Greyhound Stadium. The Dublin Docklands Development Authority is also now redeveloping a large site; a Village Improvement Scheme is being implemented for Ringsend; and Irishtown Stadium.

Dublin city based Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club has completed developing its state of the art 100-berth marina facility in the heart of Ireland’s capital. Situated in Ringsend, a harbour area with a colourful maritime tradition stretching back to the 17th century, Poolbeg Yacht/Boat Club & Marina is in a prime location just 3kms from the cultural, historic, social and retail centre of Dublin.

The club has been welcoming locals and visitors alike for over thirty years. Members old and new, appreciate the friendly, family-oriented atmosphere of this highly sociable club.

The new 1.5 million euro marina development is a major new city attraction, particularly for visitors wishing to berth their vessels near the heart of Dublin and for Dublin based owners who like their vessels moored near the office for a quick getaway on Friday evenings! The marina also meets the international standards required to satisfy any yachtsperson who visits a European capital city

On-shore, the Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club’s existing and new members, have benefited from the expansion and redevelopment of its clubhouse which has undergone a 500,000 euro dramatic facelift.

pic_1.jpg The only Yacht/Boat Club & Marina in the heart of Dublin. A number of berths are available, depending on size, on an annual or six month basis. Berths are also available for visitors on a short-term basis.

Poolbeg Yacht/Boat Club & Marina offers a unique package to serious sailors, leisure-time enthusiasts or beginners alike:

* The only marina and club in the heart of Dublin
* 100 secure fully serviced berths for long and short term stays
* Welcoming and sociable
* Full club support and facilities
* All levels of sailing and training for adults and children
* Affiliated to the Irish Sailing Association

Poolbeg Yacht, Boat Club & Marina, South Bank, Pigeon House Road, Ringsend, Dublin 4. Tel: +353 1 668 9983, Fax: +353 1 668 7177, email: [email protected]

Have we got your club details? Click here to get involved

Published in Clubs

About boot Düsseldorf: With almost 250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair and every year in January the “meeting place" for the entire industry. From 18 to 26 January 2020, around 2,000 exhibitors will be presenting their interesting new products, attractive further developments and maritime equipment. This means that the complete market will be on site in Düsseldorf and will be inviting visitors on nine days of the fair to an exciting journey through the entire world of water sports in 17 exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology, equipment and accessories, services, canoes, kayaks, kitesurfing, rowing, diving, surfing, wakeboarding, windsurfing, SUP, fishing, maritime art, marinas, water sports facilities as well as beach resorts and charter, there is something for every water sports enthusiast.

At A Glance – Boot Dusseldorf 

Organiser
Messe Düsseldorf GmbH
Messeplatz
40474 Düsseldorf
Tel: +49 211 4560-01
Fax: +49 211 4560-668
Web: https://www.boot.com/

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

Featured Webcams

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events

tokyo sidebutton
sovscup sidebutton
vdlr sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
viking sidebutton

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating