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Displaying items by tag: Waterways

Waterways Ireland is advising Shannon Navigation users that a vessel is presently sunk immediately downstream of the bridge at Shannonbridge and is a hazard to navigation.

It is intended to lift this vessel using a pontoon and lifting equipment on Thurs 30 Jun 2011, commencing at 08.00hrs. It is expected that the operation will take four hours. Masters should expect to be delayed when passing through the area.

All vessels passing the pontoons should exercise due caution and heed the advice and instructions of the safety boat in attendance.

Southbound vessels in particular should be aware of their speed as they approach the navigation arch with the attending flow in order to avoid a close quarters situation with the pontoon. Use of extra fenders in the bow area of vessels would be a prudent precautionary measure when passing the lifting rig.

Published in Inland Waterways
12 teams will battle it out in the first Waterways Ireland Inter-Counties Sailing Championship which will take place next Sunday in the Grand Canal Dock in heart of Dublin’s Docklands.

The following is the list of counties, club (where applicable) and the skipper/helm of the teams formally entered to date.

Mayo

Mayo Sailing Club

Justin Cullen & Co

Wicklow

 

Tim Greenwood & Co

Limerick

Foynes Yacht Club

Donal Mc Cormack & Co

Dublin West

Defence Forces

Mick Liddy & Co

Galway

 

Fergal O'Flaherty & Co

Donegal

Lough Swilly Yacht Club

Stephen Doherty & Co

Dublin

National Yacht Club

Adam Winkelmann & Co

Clare

Royal Western Yacht Club

Martin McNamara & Co

Wexford

Wexford Harbour Boat

& Tennis Club

Ben Scallan & Co

Down

Royal Northern Ireland Yacht Club

& Dublin Bay Sailing Club 

John Mc Donald / Ruan O Tiarnaigh & Co

Further entries expected, include a team from Offaly and rumour has it an all girl team led by a prominent female sailor from Dublin.

The organisers are delighted to have the support of the Irish Sailing Association and will use 8 of the Sailfleet J80’s for racing.

 The championship will comprise a series of elimination flights (heats) to take place on Sunday 26th June from 1100hrs – 1500hrs, with the final taking place between 1500 – 1600hrs to decide the first Waterways Ireland Inter-Counties Sailing Champions.

To compliment the sailing event, the Docklands Business community are staging the Docklands Summer Festival, to run on Saturday and Sunday 25/26th June, with all kinds of watersports activities & try it sessions including; windsurfing, Stand Up Paddle Boarding, Kayaking, Peddle Boats, Barge Trips, Hire Boat Display, Plurabelle Paddlers Dragon Boat Display, plus markets, street entertainment, more details of which can be seen at www.docklandssummerfestival.com

The sailing event is sponsored by Waterways Ireland, an all island body set up to manage & promote all of Ireland’s waterways. 

Published in Inland Waterways
Leitrim Guardian Person of the Year Brendan Harvey was on hand to launch Lough Rynn's new Wheelyboat last weekend, the Leitrim Observer reports.
The boat is specially designed to meet the needs of people with disabilities in the area, giving them greater access to Leitrim's lakes and inland waterways for fishing or pleasure trips.
Built in England by registered charity the Wheelyboat Trust, the project was initiatied the Leitrim Association of People with Disabilities (LAPWD), with help from the Rinn-Shannon Agling Club.
The boat, named Ernest's Pride, is so called in tribute to Ernest Catherines, a "driving force" behind the scheme who passed away last month.

Leitrim Guardian Person of the Year Brendan Harvey was on hand to launch Lough Rynn's new Wheelyboat last weekend, the Leitrim Observer reports.

The boat is specially designed to meet the needs of people with disabilities in the area, giving them greater access to Leitrim's lakes and inland waterways for fishing or pleasure trips.

Built in England by registered charity the Wheelyboat Trust, the project was initiatied the Leitrim Association of People with Disabilities (LAPWD), with help from the Rinn-Shannon Agling Club.

The boat, named Ernest's Pride, is so called in tribute to Ernest Catherines, a "driving force" behind the scheme who passed away last month.

Published in Inland Waterways
This year, on inland waterways, the River Barrow and her sisters, the Nore and the Suir, will greet again some old friends, the barges of the Heritage Boat Association (HBA). These barges, or canal boats as they are more accurately known, are the same boats that in their earlier working lives carried the cargos that were the commercial lifeline of Ireland.

This year we celebrate the 220th anniversary of the opening of the Barrow Navigation. This linked the Grand Canal with the rivers Barrow, Nore and Suir, and opened up a large area of the hinterland to the great ports of Dublin and Waterford. When the canals closed to commercial traffic in the 1960s it was feared that all use of the navigation would soon cease. Indeed, non-commercial traffic did become very light, but now, following excellent remedial works by Waterways Ireland we welcome a new era for this navigation, one which will bring new life and vitality to the waterway in the towns and villages along the system.

A hundred years ago, 1,200 boatmen were engaged in the business of transporting cargo, connecting people in inland towns with those in Irish ports, and in turn linking them with the great sea ports of the world. Today, many of their descendants live along our inland navigations.

Three of these great canal boats, numbers 72M, 68M and 107B, escorted by a flotilla of other HBA boats will, over the next few months, travel the entirety of the Navigation including Carlow, Waterford, Carrick on Suir, Inistioge and all points in between. The crews are anxious to meet with those whose families had connections with the commercial trade along the waterway, and perhaps even re-unite some long retired boatmen with their old boat.

The following are the expected arrival dates in various locations over the next few weeks:

° Carlow April 9th from 14.00
° Leighlinbridge April 16th from 14.00
° Bagenalstown April 24th from 13.00

Published in Inland Waterways
An inland waterways Parade of Boats will take place at Castle Island between 12.00pm and 4.00pm and proceed to the Round "O" and from there return to the Broadmedows.

Masters are requested by Waterways Ireland to give the parade a wide berth if not participating in it and to proceed at slow speed and with minimum wash when passing and to heed any advice offered by parade marshals.

 

Published in Inland Waterways
A £2.6 million (€3.06 million) project to protect Irish and Scottish waterways from destructive plants was launched earlier this week at Queens University Belfast, First Science reports.
The main aim of the project is to control invasive plant species such as the giant hogweed which have rapidly taken over riverbanks and have a disastrous effect on biodiversity.
The sap of giant hogweed is especially hazardous to river users for its phototoxity, which can cause severe burn-like wounds when affected skin is exposed to sunlight.
The CIRB (Controlling Priority Invasive Species and Restoring Native Biodiversity) project, funded by the EU, will focus on the River Faughan in Co Derry, the Newry Canal/Clanrye River and the Rive Dee/River Glyde in Co Louth as well as 12 catchments within the Argyll, Ayrshire, Galloway and Tweed areas of Scotland.
First Science has more on the story HERE.

A £2.6 million (€3.06 million) project to protect Irish and Scottish inland waterways from destructive plants was launched earlier this week at Queens University Belfast, First Science reports.

The main aim of the project is to control invasive plant species such as the giant hogweed which have rapidly taken over riverbanks and have a disastrous effect on biodiversity.

The sap of giant hogweed is especially hazardous to river users for its phototoxity, which can cause severe burn-like wounds when affected skin is exposed to sunlight.

The CIRB (Controlling Priority Invasive Species and Restoring Native Biodiversity) project, funded by the EU, will focus on the River Faughan in Co Derry, the Newry Canal/Clanrye River and the Rive Dee/River Glyde in Co Louth as well as 12 catchments within the Argyll, Ayrshire, Galloway and Tweed areas of Scotland.

First Science has more on the story HERE.

Published in Inland Waterways

Masters, owners and inland waterways users on the Grand Canal, the Barrow Navigation and the Royal Canal are advised that the daily seasonal working hours for Lock Keepers and Water Patrollers have recently been updated.  Specific details of the updated schedules are given on the attached ‘Working Hours’ table; including location, contact number & day off.  Please refer to the relevant Navigation Guides for the locations of the locks.

In landWaterways Ireland advises all Masters and users to contact Lock Keepers / Water Patrollers on the navigations prior to travel where possible.

Waterways Ireland reminds Masters and users to leave all locks as they were found.  It is normal to leave the lock empty with a tail rack up, the breast (upper) gates closed and all racks on the breast (upper) gate side of the lock down or closed. Please find full schedule of lock keepers hours attached below.

Published in Inland Waterways

So-called 'killer shrimp' may be on the way to Ireland, experts have warned.

The dikerogammarus villosus shrimp - which has spread aggressively throughout Europe and was discovered in England last month - may have a devastating effect on local wildlife and Inland Waterways if it is introduced to Irish waters, according to conservationists.

Northern Ireland Environment Agency spokesman John Early asked anglers, boat owners and all water users to be "vigilant and protect our lakes and rivers from new introductions.

"The recent arrival of the killer shrimp in Britain has highlighted the need for water users to clean equipment and boats before moving to another water body."

The Belfast Telegraph described the killer shrimp as "a voracious predator, killing a range of native species, including freshwater invertebrates and even young fish."

But despite its dangerous reputation, the shrimp poses no risk to drinking water supplies.

Published in Inland Waterways
Tagged under
22nd April 2010

Welcome to Afloat TV

afloattv_header

Since 2003 the team behind Afloat magazine has also been producing high-end, internationally appealing and entertaining factual documentaries on the Irish waterways. The production team are a mix of creative, technical and business people whose expertise guarantees an innovative approach to production and a high-quality finished product. The focus is on marine based programmes which entertain and educate. The work has been broadcast on RTE One and internationally on Sky Channels.

 

The Bay

Screened on RTE One in 2005.

Take a trip around the one half of Ireland's capital city you probably know the least. A new four-part documentary series, The Bay will be screened over four consecutive Wednesdays in May. Using spectacular aerial and underwater footage, the series features a combination of personality-led interviews and themes to tell the story of Dublin's unique waterway. Dublin Bay stretches over six kilometres, from Howth Head on its northern tip to Dalkey Island in the south. It's a place most Dubliners simply take for granted, and one of the capital's least visited places. But there's more going on out there than you'd imagine. And that's why The Bay was made. The series introduces viewers to the rich diversity of activities and personalities around the bay, while also touching on the serious environmental and political issues facing it. Find out more about the bay here.

 

The Harbour

Screened on RTE One in 2007.

It’s one of the largest natural harbours in the world – and those living near Cork Harbour insist that it’s also one of the most interesting. This was the last port of call for the most famous liner in history, the Titanic, but it has been transformed into a centre for chemical and pharmaceutical industry. Giraffe wander along its shores, from which tens of thousands of men and women left Ireland, most of them never to return. The harbour is home to the oldest yacht club in the world, and to the Irish Navy. This deep waterway has also become a vital cog in the Irish economy. ‘The Harbour’ is not a history programme, nor is it a news focus. It’s simply an exploration of this famous waterway, its colour and its characters. Find out more about the harbour here.

 

The Estuary

Screened on RTE One in 2007.

The story of the Shannon estuary might well be one of neglect, except that against the odds this waterway has become one of Ireland's greatest natural resources. Windswept, sitting on the edge of the Atlantic, often ignored by the nation. The story of the Shannon estuary might well be one of neglect, except that against the odds this waterway has become one of Ireland's greatest natural resources. A new four-part documentary series, from the makers of RTÉ's The Bay and The Harbour series, uncovers the secrets of the Shannon Estuary. From flying boats to film-making, wildlife to wind-farms, the series reveals how a 100km-stretch of the Shannon waterway has become a hotbed for innovation in Ireland. Up to 40% of Irish energy needs are met here, on the shores of a waterway that is also home to Ireland's second largest airport, a 10,000 student university and a massive cargo port. Ireland - and the world - has learned from the estuary. The first duty free shop was opened here, along with the first industrial free zone. Over the years, thousands of business and political leaders from across the globe have come to Shannon to discover its secret - in the hope that they might copy it. Long before Ireland heard of green energy, this place was producing it. Listen in to dolphin conversations beneath the Shannon's waterline. Uncover the mystery of the Ark, the church on wheels built by a priest who prayed when the tide went out. Narrated by Brenda Fricker, the series aired on Friday nights at 7.30pm on RTÉ One from May 4th 2007. Find out more about the estuary here.

 

The Navy

Screened on RTE One in 2007.

60 years of the Irish Naval Service. Celebrating the 60th anniversary of the Irish Naval Service, this 3 x half-long feature documentary shows how the Service has evolved into a multi-tasking, multi-disciplinary force. Most Irish people rarely come into contact with the Naval Service, and so are unaware of the range of activities it undertakes. This documentary provides an ideal opportunity to reveal the full extent of the Service’s duties – and the commitment of those who serve on Ireland’s fleet.

The Regattas

Screened on RTE One, 2007 and Sky Sports in 2009.

Sailing featured in RTE’s Christmas schedules this year, with the broadcast of a half-hour documentary feature on the Volvo Dun Laoghaire Regatta 2007. The production, entitled ‘The Regatta’, was shot over four days in Dublin Bay during this year’s regatta. Made by Baily Films, the company behind earlier critically-acclaimed water-based documentaries The Bay, The Harbour, The Estuary and The Navy, it features spectacular on-board footage from a range of craft competing in the event. The Regatta takes viewers both on board the competing craft, and behind the scenes, to examine the challenges thrown up by organising such a large-scale event on the bay. The Regatta was broadcast on RTE 1 on Saturday, December 22, at 4.20pm.

IN DEVELOPMENT


Afloat TV projects at an advanced stage of development include:

The Edge of Ireland


Ireland’s attitude to the seas that surround her is one of the most curious in the world. An island nation, with more coastline than most other European nations, most of her citizens look inland.

Yet no-one in Ireland lives further than 100 kilometres from the sea, and the majority of the population are housed within 10 kilometres of the coast.

More than any other European nation, our history is written on our shores. The very first settlers clung to it, fearing to explore inland. The shores fed and sustained them, and continued to sustain communities from Malin Head to Mizen Head for the next 9,000 years.

From the fort of Dun Aengus to the fields at Carnsore Point, from Inishvickillane to Bull Island, the coastline holds a key to our understanding of Ireland and ourselves.

The Edge of Ireland will uncover that hidden history of Ireland, and explore what the future holds for our coastline. Travelling around the coast, it will use local and national experts to relate individual accounts of how the sea has connected with the land to shape a local community or the nation at large.

The six half-hour series will be presented thematically, rather than using a linear journey up and down the coastline.

CONTACT

If you're keen on promoting Ireland's waterways and would like to get involved with Afloat TV please email us here.

Published in Afloat TV
13th July 2009

Waterways Ireland

Waterways Ireland is one of the six North/South Implementation Bodies established under the British Irish Agreement in 1999.

Waterways Ireland has responsibility for the management, maintenance, development and restoration of inland navigable waterways principally for recreational purposes. The waterways under the remit of the body are the Barrow Navigation, the Erne System, the Grand Canal, the Lower Bann, the Royal, the Shannon-Erne Waterway and the Shannon Navigation.

The headquarters for Waterways Ireland is in Enniskillen, and regional offices are located in Carrick-on-Shannon, Dublin and Scarriff.

Waterways
Shannon Erne Waterway
Erne System
Grand Canal
Barrow Navigation
Lower Bann Navigation
Royal Canal
Shannon Navigation

ACTIVITIES ON THE INLAND WATERWAYS

Powerboat Sports take place on a number of the navigations managed by Waterways Ireland.
From powerboat schools to jet-skis, to waterskiing and wakeboard coaching, there are a multitude of options for getting out on the water on or behind a powerboat.
Irish Waterski Federation (IWSF) govern both the waterskiing and wakeboarding in both Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland can be contacted through Eileen Galvin, Cork PB&WSC, Agherinagh, Dripsey, Co. Cork, email: [email protected]
Details of all course providers offering powerboat and inland waterways helmsman courses and certification to ISA/IWAI/Dept of Marine and Waterways Ireland approved standards can be found on the web at sailing.ie

Cruising/Charter Boating  Chartering a boat on Ireland’s inland waterways is simple. No license is required, no commercial traffic operates, the waterways are a purely leisure experience.
All the waterways where charter boats operate are networked together so you can have a river, lake and canal experience all in the one holiday.
The decision as to which company to travel with is actually a decision about which experience you want most of – the bustle of river life on the Shannon, the tranquility of the island dotted waters of the Erne System, the regular rhythm of the locks of the Shannon Erne Waterway, Grand and Royal Canals and the Barrow Navigation.

Angling  Waterways Ireland is responsible for angling on the Grand and Royal Canals and on sections of the Barrow Navigation and Shannon-Erne Waterway. The Central Fisheries Board under contract to Waterways Ireland carry out fisheries development, weed management and manage water quality on these waterways.
The management of angling on the Erne System, Lower Bann Navigations, Shannon-Erne Waterway and Shannon Navigation is managed by a number of different organisations.
On the Lower Bann Navigation and Lough Erne the management and development of the fisheries is undertaken by the Department of Culture and Leisure – Inland Fisheries and is conserved by the Fisheries Conservancy Board for Northern Ireland, 1 Mahon Road, Portadown, Craigavon, Co Armagh BT62 3EE, tel no 044 28 3833 4666.
For game fishing on the Lower Bann contact Bann Systems, Cutts House, 54 Castleroe Road, Coleraine BT51 3RL, tel no 044 28 7034 4796.
The Ulster Coarse Fishing Federation supports coarse fishing on the Lower Bann and Lough Erne and can be contacted via Robert Buick, Chairman, 7 Knockvale Grove, Belfast BT5 6HL
On the Shannon Navigation the Shannon Regional Fisheries Board manages the fisheries and can be contacted at Military Road, Birr, Co. Offaly, tel no 0353 509 21777. Coarse angling on all the waterways in the Republic of Ireland is supported by the National Coarse Fishing Federation of Ireland and can be contacted through Mark Heffernan, Coistra, Clogherhead, tel no 0252 41 9822772.

Sailing
Sailing is enjoyed on the navigations with established clubs on Lough Ree, Lough Derg and the Erne System as well as a range of outdoor centres on the other navigations.
A large range of classes including Mirrors, Optimists, J24’s, Lasers, Squibs, Fireballs and a multitude others can be found sailing throughout the week from April to October.
The majority of sailing establishments also run sailing courses and teach people from a wide range of ages to sail.
While many boats are sailed for pleasure a great number also compete regularly throughout the season, with some travelling to compete in regattas and championships on the other lakes.
Sailing is governed in the Republic of Ireland by the Irish Sailing Association who can be contacted at 2 Park Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin, tel 0252 1 280 0239 Fax no 00 353 1 280 7558, email [email protected]
Sailing in Northern Ireland is governed by the Royal Yachting Association (NI) and can be contacted at House of Sport, Upper Malone Road, Belfast BT9 5LA, tel no +44 28 9038 3812.

Canoeing
Ireland, North and South, has a lot of offer the recreational paddler from the wide open lakes of Lough Erne, Lough Allen, Lough Derg and Lough Ree to the meandering channels of the Lower Bann and the Shannon Navigation, and the still waters of the Grand and Royal Canals, the Barrow Navigation and the Shannon-Erne Waterway.
On the Erne System a way-marked canoe trail has been put in place, and one is planned for the Barrow Navigation and the Lower Bann Navigation.
Clubs offer the newcomer both learning and opportunities to participate with others. Many outdoor centres along the navigations also offer opportunities to learn and improve skills. Hire of canoeing equipment is also widely available
The governing body for canoeing in Northern Ireland is the Canoe Association of Northern Ireland and can be contacted at CANI, Unit 2 River’s Edge, 13–15 Ravenhill Road, Belfast BT6 8DN, tel no 0870 240 5065, email [email protected] In the Republic of Ireland, canoeing is governed by the Irish Canoe Union, and they can be contacted at Sport HQ, Joyce Way, Park West Business Park, Nangor Road, Dublin 12 Tel no 00 353 1 6241105, email [email protected]

Walking
Walking, for leisure, pleasure or for health is the most predominant activity along the banks of Ireland’s inland waterways. Whether walking into town from a mooring, or walking along one of the Waymarked Ways along the waterways which include the Lough Derg Way, the Barrow Way, the Grand Canal Way, the Royal Canal Way, Slí Liatroma, the Miners’ Way Historical Trail and the Cavan Way, the presence of the waterway adds an indefinable extra to the experience.
For information on the way-marked ways contact the National Way-Marked Ways Advisory Committee, Irish Sports Council, Top Floor, Block A, West End Office Park, Blanchardstown, Dublin 15, tel no 0353 1 860 8800, email [email protected]

Waterways Ireland, 2 Sligo Road, Enniskillen, Co Fermanagh BT74 7JY, tel: +44 (0) 28 66 323 004, fax: +44 (0) 28 66 346 257

Published in Organisations
Page 2 of 3

About boot Düsseldorf: With almost 250,000 visitors, boot Düsseldorf is the world's largest boat and water sports fair and every year in January the “meeting place" for the entire industry. From 18 to 26 January 2020, around 2,000 exhibitors will be presenting their interesting new products, attractive further developments and maritime equipment. This means that the complete market will be on site in Düsseldorf and will be inviting visitors on nine days of the fair to an exciting journey through the entire world of water sports in 17 exhibition halls covering 220,000 square meters. With a focus on boats and yachts, engines and engine technology, equipment and accessories, services, canoes, kayaks, kitesurfing, rowing, diving, surfing, wakeboarding, windsurfing, SUP, fishing, maritime art, marinas, water sports facilities as well as beach resorts and charter, there is something for every water sports enthusiast.

At A Glance – Boot Dusseldorf 

Organiser
Messe Düsseldorf GmbH
Messeplatz
40474 Düsseldorf
Tel: +49 211 4560-01
Fax: +49 211 4560-668
Web: https://www.boot.com/

The first boats and yachts will once again be arriving in December via the Rhine.

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