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Marina pontoon installation work is well underway at Cape Clear Island's North Harbour where pontoons to the value of €200,000 have been procured for the West Cork island harbour.

Under the 2017 fishery harbour and coastal infrastructure capital programme, Junior Minister Andrew Doyle told the Dail Harbour's debate in June he had allocated €720,000 for maintenance and development works at the Island's North Harbour.

'The 2017 programme provides €200,000 for pontoons at Cape Clear and €250,000 for the design, preparation of contract documents and planning for additional repair work to Duffy's Pier' he said.

Read more on the works in our June report here.

Published in Irish Marinas

It may be just three miles long by one mile wide but there's heaps of maritime activity on Ireland’s southern most inhabited Gaeltacht island, Cape Clear. 

Removed from the hustle and bustle of mainland life, Cape Clear offers relaxation, nature and peace. Photographer Bob Bateman captured exactly that (see images below) on a recent visit to the rugged and remote island, eight miles off the coast of West Cork.

Cape Clear’s remote island location, coupled with its proximity to the continental shelf, makes it a foremost centre for bird watching in Ireland. It is also a marine widlife haven with Whales, leatherback turtles, sun fish, dolphins and sharks are spotted regularly every year. 

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Published in Island News

The good news for West Cork boaters is that the €200,000 pontoons procured for Cape Clear island's North Harbour will be installed this Summer. And as our photo taken this week shows there's little doubt that they will be put to immediate use.

Under the 2017 fishery harbour and coastal infrastructure capital programme, Junior Minister Andrew Doyle told the Dail Harbour's debate in June he had allocated €720,000 for maintenance and development works at the Island's North Harbour. 'The 2017 programme provides €200,000 for pontoons at Cape Clear and €250,000 for the design, preparation of contract documents and planning for additional repair work to Duffy's Pier' he said.

After storm damage wrecked the coastal infrastructure there, construction work has been underway at Cape Clear island since 2014. As Afloat previously reported in March that year, the works have involved the construction of a slipway; replacement of the Bull's Nose structure incorporating a storm gate and an extension to the end of Duffy's Pier; excavation, dredging and reclamation works including the construction of an armoured embankment at the seaward side of the new Bull's Nose structure.

It is expected the Duffy’s Pier preparatory work will also be completed in 2017. However, further work will be subject to permission and funding in future years.

Published in Coastal Notes

Pontoons in Cape Clear, West Cork a small craft harbour in Killybegs, County Donegal and dredging works in Howth, County Dublin are part of an €18m Capital Investment Package in 2016 for the development of Ireland’s fishery harbour network announced today by Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Simon Coveney T.D. See the full table below.

Announcing the investment package, the Minister said “In total I am allocating €18m for this year's Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Capital Programme. I have set aside €16m towards safety, maintenance and new development works at the six Fishery Harbour Centres at Howth, Dunmore East, Castletownbere, Dingle, Rossaveel and Killybegs. I am also making €2m available for a Local Authority Harbour Programme, and I am assessing specifically what is required to address storm damage at Local Authority owned fishery harbours.”

Flagship projects in the 2016 Capital Programme (see table1) include the provision of dedicated Ferry pontoons on the West Pier in Howth, infrastructure upgrades in Dunmore East, commencement of the Dinish Wharf expansion Project in Castletownbere, expansion of the small craft harbour in Ros an Mhíl and the Smooth Point pier extension in Killybegs. The Minister continued, “While there are a number of flagship projects for completion this year, of equal importance is the preparatory work for significant potential projects in Howth, Dunmore East, An Daingean and Ros an Mhíl”

The 2016 Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Capital Programme outlined by the Minister also contains funding of €2m to assist coastal Local Authorities repair, maintain and develop piers, harbours and slipways under their ownership. The Minister stated “I am delighted to continue to support Local Authorities in their efforts to maintain and develop the fishery harbour network which provides much needed facilities for our rural fishing and marine focussed communities. A number of smaller fishing piers around the coast experienced some damage during the recent storms and we are currently assessing how best to assist Local Authorities in carrying out repairs”

Concluding on the 2016 Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Capital Programme, the Minister said “This year’s programme is significant on a number of fronts, firstly it provides for the continuation of this Governments strategy to develop and improve the facilities at our fishery harbours in 2016. Secondly it prepares the groundwork for potential projects in the coming years all of which will benefit the fishing industry, seafood processing sector, other ancillary marine industries.”

 

Table 1- Fishery Harbour & Coastal Infrastructure Development Programme 2016 

Location Project Cost €m

Howth:

Traffic Management Works

East Pier Repairs

Pontoons to west pier for ferry landings

Engineers office

Preparation of Dumping at Sea licence

Provision of Berthing Face to Middle Pier

Electric Works West Pier

Gas Main

Other Services (Sewers,ducting,watermains)

Total

0.150

0.050

0.400

0.050

0.100

0.100

0.300

0.150

0.150

1.450

Dunmore East:

Harbour Office Upgrade

West Wharf upgrade

Breakwater (Design Report)

- Harbour Road re-surface

Total

0.700

0.200

0.160

0.100

1.160

Castletownbere:

Harbour User toilet and Shower facilities

Dinish Wharf Expansion

Harbour Slipway

Quayside Electrical Upgrade

Harbour Offices Upgrade

Replacement of water network Dinish

Dinish Bridge Survey

CCTV

Total

0.090

1.000

0.040

0.150

0.250

0. 450

0.080

0.070

2.130

An Daingean:

 

 

 

 

Workshop Design ,Planning and commence works

Capital Dredging Navigation Channel –  Dumping at sea

  Licence, tender preparation and preparation works

Net mending area

Total

0.400 

0.500

0.100

1.000

Ros an Mhíl:

 

 

 

- Quay Development – Design, Evaluations, Consulting, EIS, Permitting and preparation works

- Small craft Harbour – Dredging

Total

0.800

1.800

2.600

Killybegs:

 

Repairs to Blackrock/Auction Hall Piers

Small Craft Harbour

Smooth Point Pier Development

- Landing Pier Fendering

- Landing Pier Electrical Design/Works

- Boatyard investment

Total

0.175

0.900

2.500

0.300

0.190

0.0 70

4.135

Cape Clear

 

 

-Pontoons

Total

400

0.400

Total Departmental Owned Marine Infrastructure projects €12.875
Safety and Maintenance and Non-Discretionary and Contractual Capital Commitments 2016 (incl Disability Access) €3.120
Total Local Authority Harbour Development and Marine Leisure €2.000
Total Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Capital Programme

€17.995

 

Published in Irish Harbours

Baltimore RNLI received an an alert from Valentia Coastguard at 09:29 this morning when a young boy in urgent need of medical attention required immediate evacuation from Cape Clear Island.

Coxswain Aidan Bushe along with 5 volunteer crewmen were launched within minutes of the alert. They proceeded in poor weather conditions to the North Harbour of Cape Clear Island against a swell of 3 metres and force 6-7 northwest winds.

When the lifeboat crew arrived at the pier the little boy was unresponsive. He was immediately stretchered aboard the the lifeboat where he was constantly monitored on the journey back to Baltimore. The lifeboat arrived at Baltimore pier at 10:30, from where the boy was transferred to Skibbereen for medical attention.

The evacuation was successfully completed in one hour, a remarkable achievement given that current weather conditions have meant frequent cancellation of local ferries.

On board were ; Coxswain Aidan Bushe, Mechanic Cathal Cottrell, crew Sean McCarthy, Jerry Smith, Ronnie Carty and Don O'Donovan

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#MarineWildlife - Do you remember the basking shark that surprised a group of bathers off Cape Clear last summer?

According to TheJournal.ie, it's now featured in a documentary shot on the fly by a team of quick-thinking filmmakers.

Aonrú, a film funded by Cork County Council and Bord Iascaigh Mhara, tackles the delicate subject of the West Cork island's future after the decline of the regional fishing industry.

But in the process of filming, they happened to be close by when the basking shark - the second-largest fish in the oceans – made its appearance, the solitary beast almost a metaphor for the island's dwindling community.

TheJournal.ie has more on the story HERE.

Published in Marine Wildlife

#woodenboat – Marine Minister Simon Coveney is confident that wooden boat building in Ireland is going to be revived writes Tom MacSweeney.

Traditional skills have been lost and there are fears that they will disappear forever, but the Minister sounds a confident note about preserving them on the current edition of my maritime programme, THIS ISLAND NATION.

"This project is going to reinvigorate wooden boat building in Ireland again. It is going to open a new chapter for us," he says. "Hopefully multiple ports around the country will be able to build projects like this in the future. We still have great skill sets of wooden boat building available to us in Ireland which we must not lose. It is projects like this that will keep them alive and encourage a new young generation."

I recorded Mr.Coveney at Liam Hegarty's boatyard at Oldcourt near Skibbereen where the Ilen, the last traditional sailing boat of its kind, is being restored. It is the boat which the legendary Conor O'Brien had built for the Falkland Islanders who so admired his previous vessel, Saoirse, when he sailed it into those islands during his round-the-world voyage in 1923-25. Liam Hegarty's yard at Oldcourt on a bend of the road from Skibbereen to Baltimore in West Cork is one of the few remaining that specialises in wooden boat building.

The Falklanders asked O'Brien, the first Irishman to sail a round-the-world voyage to emulate the boat on which he arrived in Port Stanley. He did as they asked, having the Ilen built in Baltimore, where Saoirse was also constructed. With two Cape Clear Islanders as crew, he sailed it to the Falklands in 1926 where it worked for 70 years until Limerickman, Gary McMahon, had it brought back to Ireland in 1997:

I was the only reporter on the quayside in Dublin when it was landed there from the deck of a cargo ship, looking every bit her age of 71 years at the time. So it was a great feeling to stand on her deck in Liam Hegarty's boatshed where the restoration work has been carried out, in conjunction with the AK Ilen boat building school, initiated by Gary McMahon, the driving force of the project Such a change from the condition in which I had seen her in the Dublin docks 18 years ago.

Gary McMahon, Liam Hegarty and Minister Coveney tell the story on the programme. Gary and Liam are both confident that Ilen will be back in the water, sailing once again. She may provide opportunities for effective sail training. Several sources have provided restoration funding. More is needed for a project which, as the Minister said, can restore Ireland's resource of traditional skills.

Also on the programme you can hear the story of a submarine which sank not once, but twice, which will make you wonder whether superstition about changing the names of boats is correct. And did you know that the Dubs beat the Kingdom ... Not in football, but fishing...?

You can hear more by listening to THIS ISLAND NATION above.

Published in Island Nation

#capeclear – As Afloat.ie reported earlier this month, L&M Keating Ltd, a building and civil engineering contractor, successfully towed and installed the contractor designed 1000t reinforced concrete lock chamber for a new storm gate on Cape Clear Island, Co. Cork from its casting basin in Verolme Dry Dock in Cork Harbour to the island, a tow of approximately 100 kilometres. L&M Keating Director Richard Browne describes how the work was completed. 

Cape Clear is Ireland's most southerly island being 6 miles off Cork's Atlantic Coast in exposed waters just a few miles from the Fastnet Rock Lighthouse. To protect the islands boating fleet during severe storms the Irish Department of Agriculture Food and the Marine have commissioned hydraulically operated storm gates to enable the inner harbour to be rapidly closed off. These gates require a substantial concrete structure to accurately hold and align the gates, in a water depth varying from 4 to 8 meters.

In response to the Departments tender invitation L&M Keating Ltd. offered a novel solution involving the precasting of the lock in a dry dock in Cork Harbour and installing temporary steel stop logs to form an enclosed chamber that would float. This chamber was then towed to site and sank on to a prepared concrete base.

After a week of pre tow preparation in the dry dock involving the installation of a deck, emergency pumping arrangements, ballasting, fitting of navigation marks and sea fastening works the sea structure was towed to sea the morning of Saturday 27th September.

The chamber was towed by the 4,000hp tug "Celtic Isle" provided by the Mainport Group, and was accompanied out of Cork Harbour by the Port Authorities tug "Gerry O'Sullivan".
Once at sea the chamber was towed at an average speed of 3.5knts arriving at Cape Clear in the early hours of Sunday 29th. The tow was then transferred to the smaller vessels "Barracuda" Vincent O'Driscoll's tug boat and Diarmuid O'Donovan's boat "Souris", and was brought into its final position against temporary steel guides. As the tide dropped the chamber followed the guides down until it rested on a concrete bed prepared earlier by divers. Once on the bottom, the chamber was flooded to prevent it floating off again.

The works are part of a €4.3M development which includes a 70m slipway, automated hydraulic storm gates (12x8m) and reconfiguration of the existing harbour entrance.
Work now continues to tie the quay on each side of structure in to the chamber, seal anchor the chamber with grout and to install and the electrical and hydraulic system commences.

Published in Island News

#capeclear – Construction work continues apace at Cape Clear island in West Cork as this latest photo posted via Twitter reveals. As Afloat previously reported in March, the works have involved the construction of a slipway; replacement of the Bull's Nose structure incorporating a storm gate and an extension to the end of Duffy's Pier; excavation, dredging and reclamation works including the construction of an armoured embankment at the seaward side of the new Bull's Nose structure.

A short aerial video of the installation of the massive 950–tonne precast concrete storm gate chamber is below.  Scroll down to view.

 

Published in Island News

#capeclear – Construction works are scheduled to commence at North Harbour, Cape Clear Island, Co. Cork. The works will take place at the mouth of the harbour (Co-ordinates 51° 26.5' North, 009° 30.22' West). 

The works will involve the construction of a slipway; replacement of the Bull's Nose structure incorporating a storm gate and an extension to the end of Duffy's Pier; excavation, dredging and reclamation works including the construction of an armoured embankment at the seaward side of the new Bull's Nose structure.

For safety reasons, mariners are requested to proceed slowly and with caution in the approach to the entrance to North Harbour and to give the works a wide berth. Wave-wash from vessels should be avoided. Divers will be deployed throughout the underwater works.

North Harbour will remain operational throughout the works, which are expected to be on- going until the end of 2014.

For further information, contact the Marine Engineering Division (Department of Agriculture, Food & the Marine) Tel: + 353 (0)66 7149340.

Published in Island News
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