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#RNLI - Independent.ie reports that a fisherman with a hand injury was hospitalised after his rescue from a trawler off Salthill by Galway RNLI yesterday afternoon (Saturday 9 December).

The volunteer lifeboat crew launched within 10 minutes of the alarm being raised and soon met the fishing boat offshore, where they treated the wound before taking him to a waiting ambulance at Galway Docks.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Dunmore East RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat sustained damage overnight while moored alongside its pontoon in the Co Waterford harbour.

Impact by another vessel in the early hours of this morning (Friday 1 December) resulted in damage to both the pontoon and the Trent class lifeboat.

Details are unclear but a report on RTÉ News suggests that the lifeboat was damaged after a fishing boat manoeuvring in the harbour collided with the pontoon.

No lifeboat personnel were involved by the incident, which was not related to any RNLI activity and has been reported as a matter of course to the Marine Casualty Investigation Board.

While the lifeboat is off service for repairs, search and rescue cover will be provided by the closest RNLI stations, as well as the Irish Coast Guard crews based in Waterford. A relief lifeboat was scheduled to arrive this evening.

WLR FM's Twitter account has a short video clip of the damage sustained to the lifeboat in the harbour this morning:

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Skerries RNLI assisted a 12-metre razor fishing vessel that developed steering problems near Loughshinny last night (Friday 17 November).

Shortly before 9pm, one of the volunteer crew raised the alarm after receiving a phone call from a fisherman on the razor boat, stating that it had fouled its rudder.

The Skerries RNLI volunteers launched their lifeboat with Conor Walsh at the helm and crew Joe May, Steven Johnson and JP Tanner.

The lifeboat located the casualty vessel, with one man on board, near Loughshinny Harbour and proceeded to tow the boat safely back into the harbour.

Weather conditions at the time was calm with a Force 1 to 2 westerly wind.

Speaking about the callout, Skerries RNLI lifeboat press officer Gerry Canning said: “It was a cold and dark night for our volunteers to be out, thankfully they were able to resolve the situation very quickly.

“This kind of thing can happen to anyone at any time, but the RNLI are always ready to respond to a call for help.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Courtmacsherry RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat was called out at 7pm on Saturday night (11 November) to go to the aid of an 80ft fishing boat that got into difficulties 15 miles south of the Seven Heads in West Cork.

The Trent class lifeboat, under coxswain Ken Cashman with a crew of five, launched immediately and proceeded at full speed to the distress area as the large trawler with four crew onboard sought assistance.

The stricken vessel was located by the lifeboat at 7.45pm and an immediate tow was put in place, proceeding at low speed back to the safe haven of Kinsale.

Weather conditions in the area at the time were misty with Force 3-4 winds and a strong swell.

Courtmacsherry RNLI lifeboat operations manager Brian O’Dwyer praised the crew for carrying out the rescue with great speed and professionalism.

He also thanked them and all station personnel for skipping Ireland’s important soccer battle in Copenhagen in order to help others in distress.

The crew of the lifeboat were coxswain Ken Cashman, mechanic Stuart Russell, Ciaran Hurley, Conor Dullea, Denis Murphy and Evin O’Sullivan.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Donaghadee RNLI has brought two fishermen to safety this morning after their 10m boat got into difficulty off the County Down coast.The volunteer lifeboat crew was alerted at 8.05am this morning (9 November), with Donaghadee RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat Saxon being launched under Coxswain Philip McNamara, at 8.07am.

The lifeboat launched at the request of Belfast Coastguard to assist a 10m fishing vessel with two people onboard. It was reported that the vessel had an overheating engine resulting in the boat breaking down approximately one mile south of Donaghadee.

Once on scene at 8.24am, the lifeboat crew assessed that the two fishermen were safe and well before working with them to establish a tow line. The lifeboat then proceeded to return the fishing boat to Donaghadee Harbour.

Weather conditions at the time were described as blowing a north westerly Force 2-3 wind with slight to moderate seas.

The lifeboat safely returned the fishing vessel to Donaghadee Harbour at 8.50am.

Speaking following the call out, Philip McNamara, Donaghadee RNLI Coxswain said: ‘The skipper of the fishing vessel made a sensible decision in requesting assistance in good time this morning before there was any danger to life and we were happy to assist and be able to return both fishermen safely to harbour’

‘We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea to always respect the water. Always wear a lifejackets, always have a means for calling and signalling for help, always check weather and tide times and make sure someone ashore knows where you are going and who to call if you don’t return on time.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Arranmore RNLI in Co Donegal was called out yesterday morning (Monday 6 November) at 11.45am to assist a 19ft fishing boat with two people onboard.

The small boat was approximately 400 metres from Arranmore Lifeboat Station when it developed engine failure.

On arrival at the stricken vessel, the lifeboat crew established a tow rope and towed the boat safely to anchor off Arranmore.

“This was probably one of the shortest calls we’ve had for several years,” said lifeboat coxswain Jimmy Early. “We were called out at 11.45am and we were back at anchor at 12.18pm.

“Whether it’s a long or short call out we are always ready to answer the call and we were delighted to help bring the boat and it’s crew to safety.”

In a separate incident on Friday (3 November), the lifeboat crew were attending a presentation in the Waterfront Hotel in Dungloe when they were alerted by a local man to a disturbance in the sea off Arranmore.

The man reported a white shape and a flock of sea birds in the sea and the lifeboat crew were asked to investigate.

On arrival, the crew discovered a dead whale which subsequently washed up at Béal a’ Chraois, a sheltered cove on the east of the island, where it remained as of yesterday.

The Waterfront Hotel had hosted a fundraising dinner dance in September in support of the Arranmore RNLI Lifeboat – raising €25,250 – and were in the process of presenting the crew with the cheque when they were interrupted by the callout.

Early added: “We would like to thank the Waterfront Hotel for their incredible generosity and congratulate them on their upgrade to four star status.

“This event goes to prove that we, the lifeboat crew are on call 24/7 and no matter what the occasion we are here to answer the call, that is our priority.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Skerries RNLI rescued two fishermen from a sinking razor fishing boat near Laytown early this morning (Thursday 2 November).

Shortly before 5.30am, Dublin Coast Guard received an emergency call from the skipper of a razor fishing boat with two men on board that was taking on water off Laytown and was beginning to list dangerously.

Lifeboats from both Skerries RNLI and Clogherhead RNLI were requested to launch to assist the casualty.

Volunteers from Skerries RNLI launched their Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson with Emma Wilson at the helm and crewed by Eoin Grimes, Steven Johnson and Jack Keane.

Weather conditions at the time were fair with a Force 1-2 northwesterly wind.

The lifeboat proceeded to the area off Laytown given as a position by the casualty vessel. There was a number of razor fishing vessels in the area, but the lifeboat soon located the casualty off the mouth of the River Nanny, where it was grounded and was being overcome by the rising tide.

Clogherhead RNLI arrived on scene shortly afterwards and stood by while the inshore lifeboat was alongside the stricken boat.

The two fishermen were taken on board the lifeboat, where they were assessed before being brought safely back to Skerries.

Speaking about the callout, Wilson said: “When we got on scene, it was quite difficult to spot the fishing vessel as it was almost underwater and there was only one remaining light in the wheelhouse.

“The crew did the right thing in calling for help, wearing their lifejackets and staying with the boat for as long as possible.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Dunmore East RNLI launched this past Wednesday afternoon (25 October) to assist a fishing vessel that was taking on water.

The two crew of the 25ft vessel were coming into the Co Waterford harbour before 2.50pm when they realised there was an ingress of water below deck.

Quick thinking by the lifeboat crew, who grabbed their salvage pump to assist, meant the vessel was able to stay afloat.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Skerries RNLI launched yesterday evening (Sunday 22 October) after receiving reports of a medical emergency on Lambay Island.

Shortly after 8.30pm, the alarm was raised by a member of the crew when they received a call from Lambay Island, indicating that a person was unwell and requiring immediate medical assistance.

Skerries RNLI volunteers launched their Atlantic 85 inshore lifeboat Louis Simson with David Knight at the helm and crewed by Steven Johnston, JP Tanner and Jack Keane.

The lifeboat proceeded to the island where they went ashore and began to administer first aid to the casualty — as well as prep a landing area for the Dublin-based Irish Coast Guard helicopter Rescue 116, who transferred the casualty to a waiting ambulance on the mainland for treatment at Beaumont Hospital.

“There were multiple rescue agencies involved in this rescue and it’s great to see everyone working so well together,” said Skerries RNLI lifeboat press officer Gerry Canning. “Our thoughts are with the casualty tonight and we wish them a speedy recovery.”

In other rescue news, PSNI officers have been praised for their “swift action” in saving a man whose car entered Lough Neagh in the early hours of yesterday morning.

As the Belfast Telegraph reports, four officers entered the water to free the man, who was unresponsive, from the partial submerged Volkswagen. He was later transferred to hospital with suspected hypothermia.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Clifden RNLI officially named its new D class lifeboat Celia Mary at a special ceremony and service of dedication held yesterday (Saturday 21 October) in the Connemara coastal town.

The honour of handing over the lifeboat and officially naming her went to the donor Peter Ross, husband of the late Celia.

He was accompanied at the ceremony in the Station House Hotel by his family and Celia’s best friend Rea Hollis, who has made a generous donation towards the running costs of Clifden Lifeboat Station.

Celia, who was from East Sussex but was of Irish descent, died three years ago shortly after her 79th birthday. She had always wanted to fund a lifeboat.

A much-loved wife and mother of five children, Celia spent many years living self-sufficiently and keeping cows and sheep. She had a great sense of humour and her kitchen was the focal point of her village.

Her idyllic life came to an end when rheumatoid arthritis took hold. But despite suffering from subsequent ill health, this did not stop her from becoming a respected antiques dealer until what has been described as her indomitable spirit succumbed and she passed away.

During the ceremony, Niamh McCutcheon, a member of the Irish Council of the RNLI, accepted the lifeboat on behalf of the charity from Peter Ross, before handing her over into the care of Clifden Lifeboat Station.

During her address, McCutcheon praised the efforts of all those who supported the work of the station.

“In 2017, Clifden RNLI has been requested to respond to 17 call outs, with a total of 26 launches, bringing 18 people to safety between the three different lifeboats on station here. You cannot put a price on the impact that has on people’s lives, whether they are volunteers or casualties.

“Our lifesavers could not have answered those calls for help without the support they receive from fellow volunteers on the shore: the fundraisers, the launch crew and the station management. In fact the whole of the RNLI depends on those people who represent our charity in the community.”

Lifeboat operations manager John Brittain accepted the lifeboat on behalf of Clifden RNLI ahead of the blessing in a service of dedication led by Father James Ronayne and the Very Reverend Stan Evans. The lifeboat was then officially named by Peter Ross.

Brittain said the event was a special occasion for the lifeboat station, adding that the crew were most grateful to Peter for his generous gift in memory of his wife which had funded the lifeboat.

“Celia always wanted a lifeboat, and now she has one in Clifden,” he said. “While her lifeboat may be a little far from her family, we have been told by her loved ones that Celia, who was of Irish descent, would have revelled in the beauty of Galway, Connemara and the Atlantic coast.”

The D class Celia Mary replaces the Grainne Uaile which served Clifden RNLI for the last 10 years. During that time, the lifeboat launched 62 times, bringing 20 people to safety.

Originally introduced in 1963, the D class has evolved into a highly capable modern lifeboat. It is the workhorse of the RNLI’s fleet and is ideal for working close inshore, near rocks or in shallow water in moderate conditions. It can be righted by the crew if it capsizes and is also part of the RNLI flood rescue team’s fleet of boats.

She comes into her own for searches and rescues in the surf, shallow water and confined locations - often close to cliffs, among rocks and even inside caves.

The RNLI established a lifeboat station in Clifden in early 1988 when a C class lifeboat was put on service for one season’s evaluation. The following year, Clifden RNLI became fully operational as a summer season-only lifeboat station.

In 1997, an Atlantic 21 lifeboat was placed on service and a new boathouse for the lifeboat and a tractor was completed in August 1998. A new D class lifeboat was placed on service in May 1998, and the following year it was joined by a new Atlantic 75 B class lifeboat which remained stationed until June 2013 when it was replaced by the Atlantic 85 named Joyce King.

A crowd of well wishers turned up to see the lifeboat officially named, with a bottle of champagne poured over the side of the boat before it launched at the end of the ceremony.

Among the guests on the platform party were Pearse Hyland, chair of the Lifeboat Management Group, who welcomed guests and opened proceedings, and inshore lifeboat mechanic Andy Bell, who gave a vote of thanks and closed proceedings.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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