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#RNLI - Independent.ie reports that a fisherman with a hand injury was hospitalised after his rescue from a trawler off Salthill by Galway RNLI yesterday afternoon (Saturday 9 December).

The volunteer lifeboat crew launched within 10 minutes of the alarm being raised and soon met the fishing boat offshore, where they treated the wound before taking him to a waiting ambulance at Galway Docks.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#Rowing: The All-in-a-Row charity event on the Liffey drew a flotilla of varied craft to the Liffey in central Dublin today in aid of the RNLI and the Irish Underwater Search and Recovery Unit (IUSRU). There were over 40 boats on the water, and there was a festive air to the outfits of many who guided them.

 The IUSRU does the valuable work of recovering bodies of those who have been lost in water. It is a low-profile group which is made up entirely of volunteers. At a reception in the Dublin Docklands building on the Liffey, Richard Kaye of the IUSRU welcomed the funding and boost in profile given by the All-in-a-Row event. Gareth Morrison of the RNLI also expressed his thanks. He spoke of the ambitious plans of the RNLI to cut deaths by drowning. A donation was also made to the St Vincent de Paul, and tribute paid to the men who died on the Kyle Clare, which was sunk in the Bay of Biscay 75 years ago, with the loss of many men, including four from Ringsend.

 Wreaths were laid and the Last Post played (by Pat O’Connor of the Communications Workers Union). The reception was attended by the Deputy Lord Mayor, Chris Andrews.

Published in Rowing

#Rowing: The second annual All-in-a-Row charity event on the River Liffey will be held this Saturday, December 9th.  Rowers, kayakers and canoeists will take part in a row or paddle to raise money for the RNLI and The Irish Underwater Search and Recovery Unit. The course runs from the Tom Clarke Bridge (formerly the East Link) to Grattan Bridge, and the event will start at 8 am and end at 3.30. There will be a base at St Patrick’s Rowing Club.

 There is a link for those who wish to donate on allinarow.ie.

 The RNLI provides a rescue service at sea, along with education and supervision on beaches. It sets out to influence other organisations, policy-makers and regulators, throughout Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales. The RNLI provides a 24-hour search and rescue service to 100 nautical miles out from the coast of Ireland and the UK.

 Ninety five per cent of RNLI people are volunteers. RNLI crews and lifeguards have saved over 142,000 lives since the institution was formed in 1824. They have 46 Lifeboat stations around the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland and four inland lifeboat stations, at Lough Derg, Lough Ree, Lough Erne and Strangford Lough.

 RNLI statistics (2016): 1,136 launches; 1,649 people rescued; 37 lives saved; on average 28 people rescued per week.

 The Irish Underwater Search and Recovery Unit (IUSRU) is a charity registered in the Republic of Ireland.

When persons go missing in rivers, canals, lakes or around our coasts they require specialist equipment and personnel to bring them home. The IUSRU is made up of a dedicated team of volunteers who search for missing people underwater and recover them so they can be given a dignified resting place.

 The IUSRU was formed in January 2012 to provide a professional, dedicated and highly trained service that could carry out the task of recovering missing persons with compassion and sensitivity.

 In 2014 there were 114 recorded deaths through drowning in Ireland.  

Published in Rowing

#CY&BC - The Clontarf Yacht & Boat Club annual Christmas Day Swim in aid of the RNLI is back for 2017.

This year’s swim takes place at 1pm on Monday 25 December at the slipway across from the CY&BC.

Those brave enough to participate — and their supporters wrapped up warm on dry land — are asked to donate any amount, great or small, to the lifeboats on the day.

Dublin Bay sea temperatures are actually coldest in February and March, when most dinghy classes resume training, so there’s no excuse not to head along for a dip before your Christmas dinner.

Published in Sea Swim

Volunteers at Union Hall RNLI are celebrating the news that their lifeboat station in West Cork is to be formally established following a successful trial.

The recommendation subject to the provision of a long term shoreworks solution was approved at a recent meeting of the RNLI Trustees.

The RNLI’s 45th lifeboat station in Ireland had been officially put on service at Union Hall in 2014 for a trial period that has lasted three years.

This followed representations that were initially made to the RNLI for a declared search and rescue asset to be established at Union Hall in February 2013.

Since then, the station has operated Maritime Nation, a B class Atlantic 75 lifeboat, from temporary station facilities, launching from a slipway adjacent to Keelbeg pier. Work will now commence towards establishing a permanent building and facilities for the station.

Since going on service, Union Hall RNLI has launched 26 times, saved one life and rescued 42 people.

The station’s lifeboat operates approximately eight miles to the west and 14 miles to the east of the greater Glandore Bay area. It is a popular spot for fishermen and visitors including anglers, rowers, swimmers and sailors. The station is flanked by Courtmacsherry RNLI to the east and Baltimore RNLI to the west.

John Kelleher, Union Hall RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager confirmed that the station had received word from the RNLI Trustees that the trial had been a success and the station, subject to a shoreworks solution, will be made permanent.

‘We have been waiting for this news and to finally get confirmation that the trial has been a success is great - I am delighted not just for our volunteer crew and station management but for everyone who has been involved and supported the setting up of a station here in the locality.

‘I would like to commend the commitment and dedication of our volunteer crew members who have devoted their time to training and to learning and developing new skills to help them save lives at sea. It is thanks to their efforts and those working so hard on the shore - be it to prepare the lifeboat to go to sea or washing it down after a call out, or to educate people about the dangers of water, or to fundraise - that we are now able to provide this service permanently to the community in West Cork and to anyone who may find themselves in distress at sea.’

Paddy O’Donovan, Union Hall Chairman added: ‘I was delighted with the news, it is a vote of confidence in our local volunteers. We wish to thank all the RNLI personnel who visited and helped in this project. We look forward to the next phase in making the station permanent.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Dunmore East RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat sustained damage overnight while moored alongside its pontoon in the Co Waterford harbour.

Impact by another vessel in the early hours of this morning (Friday 1 December) resulted in damage to both the pontoon and the Trent class lifeboat.

Details are unclear but a report on RTÉ News suggests that the lifeboat was damaged after a fishing boat manoeuvring in the harbour collided with the pontoon.

No lifeboat personnel were involved by the incident, which was not related to any RNLI activity and has been reported as a matter of course to the Marine Casualty Investigation Board.

While the lifeboat is off service for repairs, search and rescue cover will be provided by the closest RNLI stations, as well as the Irish Coast Guard crews based in Waterford. A relief lifeboat was scheduled to arrive this evening.

WLR FM's Twitter account has a short video clip of the damage sustained to the lifeboat in the harbour this morning:

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Skerries RNLI assisted a 12-metre razor fishing vessel that developed steering problems near Loughshinny last night (Friday 17 November).

Shortly before 9pm, one of the volunteer crew raised the alarm after receiving a phone call from a fisherman on the razor boat, stating that it had fouled its rudder.

The Skerries RNLI volunteers launched their lifeboat with Conor Walsh at the helm and crew Joe May, Steven Johnson and JP Tanner.

The lifeboat located the casualty vessel, with one man on board, near Loughshinny Harbour and proceeded to tow the boat safely back into the harbour.

Weather conditions at the time was calm with a Force 1 to 2 westerly wind.

Speaking about the callout, Skerries RNLI lifeboat press officer Gerry Canning said: “It was a cold and dark night for our volunteers to be out, thankfully they were able to resolve the situation very quickly.

“This kind of thing can happen to anyone at any time, but the RNLI are always ready to respond to a call for help.”

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

#RNLI - Courtmacsherry RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat was called out at 7pm on Saturday night (11 November) to go to the aid of an 80ft fishing boat that got into difficulties 15 miles south of the Seven Heads in West Cork.

The Trent class lifeboat, under coxswain Ken Cashman with a crew of five, launched immediately and proceeded at full speed to the distress area as the large trawler with four crew onboard sought assistance.

The stricken vessel was located by the lifeboat at 7.45pm and an immediate tow was put in place, proceeding at low speed back to the safe haven of Kinsale.

Weather conditions in the area at the time were misty with Force 3-4 winds and a strong swell.

Courtmacsherry RNLI lifeboat operations manager Brian O’Dwyer praised the crew for carrying out the rescue with great speed and professionalism.

He also thanked them and all station personnel for skipping Ireland’s important soccer battle in Copenhagen in order to help others in distress.

The crew of the lifeboat were coxswain Ken Cashman, mechanic Stuart Russell, Ciaran Hurley, Conor Dullea, Denis Murphy and Evin O’Sullivan.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

A new Atlantic 85 class lifeboat has gone on service at Carrybridge RNLI. The lifeboat which arrived at the Upper Lough Erne lifeboat station on Tuesday (7 November), replaces Duckhams 2001, which has been used to rescue people on Lough Erne in County Fermanagh since 2015.

Volunteer lifeboat crew began a period of familiarisation training on Tuesday afternoon with their first exercise on the Douglas, Euan and Kay Richards.

The new lifeboat has been funded by The John and Elizabeth Allan Memorial Trust. Professor James Allan’s interest in the RNLI began as a child when he went to Fraserburgh in Scotland, on holiday with his family. Along with his sister Elizabeth, he met the volunteer lifeboat crew and on returning a year later, Professor Allan was delighted that the crew remembered them.

The new lifeboat for Carrybridge is to be named Douglas, Euan and Kay Richards after the children of Professor Allan’s doctor. The lifeboat will be officially named at a special naming ceremony and service of dedication at Carrybridge RNLI’s lifeboat station next year. Carrybridge RNLI also has a Rescue Water Craft.

During her time at Carrybridge, Duckhams 2001 launched 64 times, with its volunteer lifeboat crew rescuing 113 people.
The new lifeboat has some advancement on its predecessor. The Atlantic 85 design allows room for four crew members and more kit than the Atlantic 75 lifeboat, which only had room for three crew members.

The lifeboat is powered by two 115 horse power engines and has a stronger hull and greater top speed of 35 knots. The added radar allows the crew to operate more effectively in poor visibility and there is also VHF direction-finding equipment.

The vessel also has a manually operated self-righting mechanism which combined with inversion-proofed engines keeps the lifeboat operational even after capsize. The lifeboat can also be beached in an emergency without causing damage to its engines or steering gear.
The Atlantic 85 which was introduced to the RNLI fleet in 2005 also carries a full suite of communication and electronic navigation aids, as well as a searchlight, night-vision equipment and flares for night-time operations.

Speaking following the arrival of the new lifeboat, Tom Bailey, Carrybridge RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager said: ‘We are extremely grateful to Professor James Allan for his generous donation which has funded our new lifeboat. As we welcome a new lifeboat, there is also a sense of nostalgia too as we bid a fond farewell to Duckhams 2001, a lifeboat that provided us with almost three great years of service. Her time here in Fermanagh brought many people safely to shore and we hope her donor family will be just as proud as we are, of her many achievements.

‘We are looking forward to being the custodians of this new lifeboat which will allow our volunteers to go on to rescue and save many more lives in the years to come.’
The RNLI is a charity which relies on voluntary contributions and legacies.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Donaghadee RNLI has brought two fishermen to safety this morning after their 10m boat got into difficulty off the County Down coast.The volunteer lifeboat crew was alerted at 8.05am this morning (9 November), with Donaghadee RNLI’s all-weather lifeboat Saxon being launched under Coxswain Philip McNamara, at 8.07am.

The lifeboat launched at the request of Belfast Coastguard to assist a 10m fishing vessel with two people onboard. It was reported that the vessel had an overheating engine resulting in the boat breaking down approximately one mile south of Donaghadee.

Once on scene at 8.24am, the lifeboat crew assessed that the two fishermen were safe and well before working with them to establish a tow line. The lifeboat then proceeded to return the fishing boat to Donaghadee Harbour.

Weather conditions at the time were described as blowing a north westerly Force 2-3 wind with slight to moderate seas.

The lifeboat safely returned the fishing vessel to Donaghadee Harbour at 8.50am.

Speaking following the call out, Philip McNamara, Donaghadee RNLI Coxswain said: ‘The skipper of the fishing vessel made a sensible decision in requesting assistance in good time this morning before there was any danger to life and we were happy to assist and be able to return both fishermen safely to harbour’

‘We would remind anyone planning a trip to sea to always respect the water. Always wear a lifejackets, always have a means for calling and signalling for help, always check weather and tide times and make sure someone ashore knows where you are going and who to call if you don’t return on time.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
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