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7th July 2009

Irish Underwater Council

The Irish Underwater Council is the national governing body for recreational underwater sports in Ireland. It was founded in 1963 to organise and promote sport scuba diving and snorkeling. At the time there were only six clubs but the sport has expanded over the years and now encompasses 84 clubs today distributed all over Ireland.

Training

The Irish Underwater Council courses provide today’s sports person with recreation and fun in a friendly environment while maintaining a safe and cautious attitude to Irish waters. We emphasise experience rather than theory. The basic objective of the training system is to demonstrate, teach and practice all the necessary abilities until the beginner is comfortable with the equipment and the basic safety skills. There is no pressure or time limits, the training is at your own pace.

Organisation

The council is administered by an Executive Committee comprising the directors of the organisation who are assisted by four commissions: Technical, Medical, Sporting & Scientific.

The Irish Underwater Council is affiliated to Confederation Mondiale des Activites Subaquatiques (CMAS) . This is the world federation of national diving organisations and operates in some 80 countries on all continents.

Irish Underwater Council, 78A Patrick Street, Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin. Tel: 01 2844 601, fax: 01 2844 602, email: [email protected]

Published in Organisations

The Irish Coast Guard (IRCG) (Garda Cósta na hÉireann) is part of the Department of Transport.

All the latest Irish Coast Guard news is here.

The Irish Search and Rescue Region, which includes most of the Republic of Ireland and parts of Northern Ireland, is the area over which the coast guard has authority. This area is bounded by the UK Search and Rescue Region.


The Coast Guard is responsible for:

– Search and Rescue

– Marine communications network

– Marine safety awareness

– Mountain and Cave Rescue

Pollution and Salvage response in the marine environment (the Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre [MRCC] in Dublin coordinates all pollution and salvage control in the Irish Exclusive Economic Zone [EEZ]).

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Note that not all Irish Coast Guards have enforcement powers – only some officers under warrant.


The Coast Guard (Garda Cósta) does not form part of the Irish Defence Forces, rather it operates as an agency of the Department of Transport under the Maritime Safety Directorate. The Maritime Safety Directorate comprises two main sections, the Maritime Safety and Marine Environment Division (MSED) and the Marine Survey Office (MSO). The Marine Survey Office also includes the Marine Radio Affairs Unit (MRAU). The Mercantile Marine Office (MMO) also works under the Directorate.

- The Maritime Safety and Marine Environment Division is responsible for maritime safety, security policy and legislation (including leisure safety), aids to navigation and corporate governance of the Commissioners of Irish Lights and marine environment protection issues.

- The Marine Survey Office deals with the inspection, survey, certification and licensing of vessels and vessels radio equipment; the examination and certification of seafarers competencies; enforcement of standards by way of audits on organisation and facilities and prosecutions for breaches of regulations.

While in some jurisdictions they are the responsibility of the Coast Guard, in Ireland, fisheries patrols are carried out by the Navy and drug smuggling patrols by Customs, the Gardaí and the Navy. However, all the above government services can at any time request assistance from each other when needed.

(The above information and image courtesy of Irish Coast Guard) 


Irish Coast Guard, MRCC Dublin, Coast Guard Headquarters, Department of Transport, Leeson Lane, Dublin 2. Tel: 01 678 2303, Fax: 01 678 3459

Published in Organisations

Irish Water Safety is the statutory body established to promote water safety in Ireland. Their role is to educate people in water safety best practices. They develop public awareness campaigns to promote necessary attitudes, rescue skills and behaviour to prevent drownings and water related accidents. Activities include:

Teaching swimming and lifesaving courses to children and adults. Recipients build skills in swimming, water confidence, safety, survival, rescue skills and resuscitation. Participants can progress to qualify as Pool and Beach Lifeguards, there are 27 qualifications that are internationally recognized and are available to children and adults nationwide.

Lectures and demonstrations to members of the Public and other interested parties.

Publishing literature to promote water safety and target at-risk groups. Popular posters include safe boating, safe swimming, and lifejacket posters. A Cold shock/hypothermia leaflet is also available as are many other publications.

Volunteers carry out Risk Assessments on all Bathing Areas nationwide, free of charge in order to make them safer by the erection of ring buoys, signage and other necessary action. The Local Authorities are most helpful in this regard.

Advise and assist Local Authorities on all matters relating to water safety.

The Nation’s Beach Lifeguards are tested by IWS examiners for the local authorities, free of charge prior to the annual summer season.

A programme exists in which National School teachers are coached in teaching water safety principles to their pupils.

Training all the boats crews for the Inshore Rescue Boat Service nationwide. The IWS also train and examine the Coast Guard Inshore Rescue Boats crews.

Promoting water safety along with other members of the Marine Safety Working Group and the Irish Marine Search and Rescue Committee.

National and local media actively communicates IWS safety messages to the public.

Issuing advice on all aspects of water safety. Press Releases are available all year round, which target the seasonal hazards on Irish waterways.

Organising the Annual National Lifesaving Championships; some members thn go on to compete in international events each year.

Awarding the ‘Just in Time’ Rescue Award to rescuers nationwide; other awards recognise work promoting Water Safety in Ireland.

The IWS develop a partnership approach with private sponsors to deliver safety messages to the public.

Providers of information on the locations of Lifeguarded beaches in Ireland.

History of Irish Water Safety

Before 1945, life-guarding was confined to a few counties in Ireland – that is, in Wexford, Waterford, Cork, Dublin and Clare. Indeed, the teaching of swimming and water safety as we know it was done on an ad hoc basis around the country, but mostly in the cities of Dublin and Cork where indoor swimming pools were available. It was only when a member of An Garda Síochána, Mr Harry Gillespie (who was Chairman of a small Water Safety Committee in County Clare) decided to approach the Irish Red Cross Society in May 1945 that Water Safety was established in Ireland on a formal basis.

Under the auspices of the Irish Red Cross Society, local Area Water Safety Committees were established in all of the counties of Ireland. Naturally, there was very little expertise in this country in the matter of water safety and swimming rescue, so it was decided that the American Red Cross should be approached as they had an excellent Water Safety Service running in the USA for many years. From them came the necessary approach to teaching water safety, then generally known as swimming rescue. Their booklets were also used as the basis for the first water safety manuals published by the Irish Red Cross Society (Water Safety Service).

It is worthy of note that several present members are recipients of the ‘Service Medal of Honour’ being founding members of the Water Safety Organisation in Ireland. For twenty-six years, Water Safety operated under the auspices of the Irish Red Cross Society and it was during this period that the structure of Examiners, Instructors and other voluntary (non-technical) personnel was established. During those early days, there were few indoor swimming pools in this country for the teaching of swimming and lifesaving. Much of the work was done during the Summer months at piers, quays, beaches, on riverbanks, and at lake sides. It was also during those first twenty-six years that we saw the increase in the use of lifeguards around the coast of Ireland during the summer. It must be remembered that few people could swim and fewer still could swim and save a life. Indeed, in many of the coastal towns and villages, particularly where their livelihood was derived from the sea, there was an old superstition, that it was better not to learn how to swim as it only prolonged the agony in the water when in difficulty.

Change was slow due to a lack of resources, but voluntary commitment was strong among the members, as it is to day. With time, improvements followed and a more conscious awareness of water safety began to unfold throughout the country, particularly as the seventies approached and the work of the Water Safety Service expand to every county throughout the country. The leading light at that time was a man called Plunkett Walsh, an employee of the Irish Red Cross Society with special responsibility for Water Safety. His great enthusiasm was an inspiration to all involved in the Water Safety Service to promote water safety awareness. However, his untimely and sudden death left a great void within the organisation.

Following this, in 1971 an approach was made to the Minister of Local Government who agreed to the establishment of the Irish Water Safety Association under the auspices of the Department of Local Government. This move was universally welcomed, albeit tinged with certain sadness on leaving the Irish Red Cross, with whom water safety had been for twenty-five years. The first Chairman of the Irish Water Safety Association was Mr Desmond Kenny who was from Galway.

With the establishment of the Irish Water Safety Association came an upsurge in membership, to meet the growing demand for swimming and lifesaving instruction throughout the country. In turn, this demand led to the construction of many indoor swimming pools and improved bathing facilities in many parts of Ireland. Shortly after the establishment of the Irish Water Safety Association, it was invited to join both Federation International De Sauvetage and World Life Saving, both international bodies dealing with water safety and rescue.

In 1987, a Government decision was made resulting in the IWSA being amalgamated with fire and road safety under the auspices of the National Safety Council. The members continued to give exceptional time and effort on a voluntary basis to ensure that swimming and lifesaving was taught nationwide and Water Safety went from strength to strength and the number of voluntary members involved continued to grow. Certificates issued for swimming and lifesaving increased annually, and the ‘Water Safety Awareness’ campaign was promulgated nationwide. With the encouragement of the National Safety Council, water safety personnel played an active role in the formation of the new International Life Saving Federation, which was established in 1994.

1995 was the 50th anniversary of the formation of Water Safety under the auspices of the Irish Red Cross, the Irish Water Safety Association and the National Safety Council. To mark this occasion, a suitable medal was struck to honour those who had given long and valued service throughout those fifty years. In November 1996 at a meeting of the Board of the National Safety Council, it was agreed that Water Safety be known as Water Safety Ireland. In the National Budget of 1998, it was announced that the Government had set a side the necessary finance to re-establish Water Safety as a singular organisation. The effect of this decision being that Water Safety was to leave the National Safety Council. The decision to establish Water Safety as the Irish Water Safety Association with its Headquarters in Galway took effect in November 1999. A Council of 12 persons was appointed with Mr Frank Nolan (a retired member of An Garda Siochana) being appointed as Chairman. The functions of the new body are similar to those that have been traditionally carried out over the past fifty-five years.

The new Association, which is the Statutory Water Safety Body for Ireland, is financed by Government, Local Authorities, fund-raising and sponsorship. The Association continues to be actively involved with International Life Saving (the world body) and co-operates with the other national organisations involved in water safety and rescue.

On the 25th August 2000, in front of a large audience, Minister of State, Mr Robert Molloy, TD, opened the new Headquarters of Irish Water Safety close to the Spanish Arch in Galway City. Irish Water Safety is governed by the Council, which is appointed by the Government for three years, supported by a full-time permanent staff. The functions of the Association are supported nationwide on a voluntary basis through 28 area Water Safety Committees and two special Committees (one within the Irish Police Force and the other within the Defence Forces). Persons who give exceptional Service over 25 to 50 years receive the ‘Medal of Honour with Bar’. Persons outside the Association, who have been supportive of Irish Water Safety over a number of years, can be honoured with a Life Governorship of the Association. Ten persons so far have been conferred with this honour.

The Irish Water Safety Motto: 'Every Person a Swimmer and Every Swimmer a Lifesaver' 

Irish Water Safety (IWS), The Long Walk, Galway. Tel: 1890 420202, Fax: 091 564700, Email: [email protected]

 

Other IWS Afloat posts here:

Summer Rain adds to danger

Published in Organisations

It has been confirmed that Ireland will have a second entry in the Volvo Ocean Race. Fastnet winner, twice Afloat sailor of the year, and national offshore-sprint hero Ger O’Rourke will use the title-holding boat, ABN Amro 1 (aka Black Betty) to take on the new generation of VO70s. Let speculation commence, says Markham Nolan.

The Irish Times reports this morning has confirmed that a second Irish entry in to the Volvo Ocean Race (VOR) will be made this week following the purchase of the winning boat from the 2005/6 race by offshore sailor Ger O'Rourke.

O'Rourke was crowned Afloat sailor of the year in 2007, becoming the first sailor to win the coveted trophy twice.

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