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Displaying items by tag: red diesel

In 2018 the Court of Justice of the European Union ruled that the UK should not allow private pleasure craft to continue to use red diesel. HMRC has just issued its consultation document which outlines the proposed change to white diesel for the propulsion of powered leisure craft, including inland boats. The document contains a number of questions for owners of diesel-powered craft.

The Cruising Association (CA) is now urging all UK boaters who use diesel fuel to respond directly to these questions. HMRC has made it clear that it will only accept responses from individuals, and not a compilation of responses.

Interested parties can access the full document, Implementation of the Court of Justice of the European Union judgment on diesel fuel used in private pleasure craft on the gov.uk website.

There are still some uncertainties about whether the CJEU ruling will actually be implemented in the UK, depending on the outcome of Brexit. Whatever the outcome, on behalf of CA members, RATS (the Regulations and Technical Services Committee), must make certain all the supply difficulties and all the problems of other stakeholders are properly and legally resolved during a workable transition period.

The CA is Britain's leading organisation for cruising sailors with 6,300 members.

Published in Cruising
Tagged under

#RedDiesel - The British Marine Federation (BMF) says it will continue to support the use of red diesel by pleasure boaters after last week's decision by the European Commission to refer the UK to the European Courts of Justice over use of the fuel.

Red-dyed agricultural diesel – like Ireland's green-dyed variety – is used by farmers and agricultural fishermen throughout the UK at a lower rate of duty and is also widely used by leisure craft owners, who have been required to pay the full rate of tax for a number of years.

The BMF says it has worked closely with the Royal Yachting Association (RYA) on the issue for many years, "working alongside the UK Government to successfully facilitate the continued use of red diesel by leisure boaters, whilst paying an appropriate level of duty."

However, two years ago the EU began a crackdown on the use of dyed diesel outside of the agricultural context, threatening to levy fines against British boats round to be using red diesel in the waters of other EU states.

This is despite arguments from the British marine industry that unmarked or 'white' diesel is not widely available in UK ports.

Commenting on this latest development, BMF chief executive Howard Pridding said: “Government officials have always understood the impact for the industry and the boating market that would arise if leisure boaters were no longer permitted to use red diesel.

"We have been in close contact with HMRC officials since the Commission’s announcement and they have indicated to us that the UK Government intends to continue to contest the infringement proceedings. Our members very much welcome their understanding of the issues and ongoing support."

The BMF adds that it will maintain regular contact with Westminster officials on the issue and assist in providing robust evidence with which the UK can make its case.

Published in News Update

#NEWS UPDATE - British boat users are risking big fines if they sail their craft outside UK waters due to new laws on the use of red diesel, the Daily Telegraph reports.

New laws coming into force on 1 April "will require anyone moving into international waters to sign a declaration that their boat is not being powered by red diesel".

Red-dyed diesel is used by farmers and commercial fishermen throughout the UK at a lower rate of duty. It is also widely used by recreational boaters and yacht owners, as is green diesel by Irish pleasure boaters, though such users have been required to pay the full rate of tax for a number of years now.

However, the European Union is now clamping down on the use of dyed diesel.

The decision by Brussels is causing consternation among the yachting community, which argues that unmarked or 'white' diesel is not widely available in harbours and marinas.

And concerns remain over the presence of biofuels in white diesel which, as previously reported on Afloat.ie, can be harmful to marine engines.

The Daily Telegraph has more on the story HERE.

Published in News Update

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