Menu
Allianz and Afloat - Supporting Irish Boating

Ireland's sailing, boating & maritime magazine

In association with ISA Logo Irish Sailing

Displaying items by tag: Ireland

29th July 2009

Waterwag

The Dublin Bay Waterwag lays claim to being the oldest one-design sailing boat in the world. Founded as a class in 1887, the design was modified in 1900 and the rules are essntially unchanged since then.

Afloat's Graham Smith wrote, in the February/March 2009 issue:

You would expect that the venerable Wag would be a class at ease with itself by just trundling along with the same number of boats, year in, year out. If you did, you’d be wrong! Four or five new boats over the previous few years plus a new one this year has brought the fleet to a very respectable 40 in its 121st year of action in the Bay. A number of these are now available to charter or to buy, although the proviso is that they must be sailed in Dun Laoghaire! There was no Wag Worlds in 2008 – it’s every second year so 2009 has the next one – but Frank Guy in Gavotte (Wag no. 24) was the leading light in the Dublin Bay racing scene during the 2008 season.
 

Published in Classes & Assoc
29th July 2009

Royal Ocean Racing Club

Royal Ocean Racing Club 1925 – 2005

If the crew of the last boat to cross the finish line of the first ever Fastnet race did hear the cheers from the Royal Western Yacht Club of England, as the new Ocean Racing Club was formed, then the sound must have carried a long way. For the Plymouth club was situated, on that August evening in 1925, in a large Victorian building, up on the Hoe. Anyway it had a fine dining room for the crews of the seven yachts (less one) and at the end of dinner, as well as at the end of a memorable race, the new club was brought into being.

Although large yachts with paid crews (virtually small sailing ships) had raced in the open sea in the previous century, that was for private wagers or special occasions (there was a Round Britain race in 1887, the fiftieth year of the Queen's reign, for eleven yachts of between 40 and 200 tons). At the beginning of the 1920s, yacht racing in Britain meant day racing, the best talent being in the 12, 8 and 6-metre boats of the International Rule of the IYRU (renamed ISAF in 1996).

Now the Cruising Club of America was formed in 1922, along the lines of the Royal Cruising Club (founded 1880) and it held a 600-mile race from New London to Bermuda in 1923 and again in 1924. These races were open to small yachts and amateur crews. Weston Martyr, a British yachting writer, who had taken part, returned to England with enthusiasm for the new sport. There followed enough response from individual owners of seaworthy cruisers for the first Fastnet race to start from Ryde, Isle of Wight, on 15th August 1925. Contrived to be about the same length as the Bermuda race, it did not pass off without much debate in the press on the wisdom of such a venture "open to any yachtsman" over such a course in our unsettled latitudes.

The select gathering at Plymouth appointed its first commodore of the Ocean Racing Club, Lt Cmdr E.G. Martin OBE RNVR, who had already won cruising awards from the RCC and from whose committee he had resigned owing to its disapproval of 'the ocean race'. Owner of the converted Havre pilot cutter, Jolie Brise, he was no stranger to racing having won the One Ton Cup in the 6-metre class in 1912. At 6ft 5in, educated at Eton and New College, Oxford, and a county cricket player, he was evidently the kind of leader to create from scratch modern ocean racing in England. There were thirty-three other founder members, among whom were Robert Somerset DSO, R. Maclean Buckley MC and Major T.P. Rose-Richards, these three later becoming flag officers. The word ‘ocean’ was as used in America, meaning racing in the open sea rather than in confined waters as previously. The object of the club was ‘to provide annually one ocean race not less than 600 miles in length’.

Looking slightly ahead, a second race was first introduced in 1928, on a triangular course in the English Channel of about 250 miles and known as ‘the Channel Race’. As for the name of the club, an application for ‘Royal’ was made in 1929, but rejected by the Home Office. However King George V was an active yachtsman and it was granted in November 1931, when the club assumed its present title. The Fastnet race has remained a central fixture of the club. It was not always secure in the early days. There was a race each year until 1931, but in 1933 it was reduced to six starters, only three of which were British. Weston Martyr wrote in Yachting World, ‘What's the matter with us? We've got the ships, we've got the men and if we haven't got the money, neither have the Americans just now: and yet they had about fifty entries this year for their race to Gibson Island’. Today the Fastnet is still with us and Gibson Island (last race 1937) is long forgotten.

For the second race the start line had been changed from Ryde to Cowes, but the yachts were still sent around the eastern end of the island, which was thought more seamanlike. The 1935 race was unique in that it started from Yarmouth, westward, and then finished at Cowes via the forts before the beginning of Cowes Week, an experiment which was not repeated. Ryde eastward was the start again in 1937, the race being won by Zeearend, thus prompting a famous comment by one of the race's great chroniclers and participants, the American journalist Alf Loomis: ‘For once the race wasn't won by a damned Yankee; no, the winner was a blasted Dutchman’. The 1947 race had a start to the east from the destroyer HMS Zephyr off Portsmouth, but thereafter it has always been westward from the Royal Yacht Squadron line at Cowes.

In 1935 (when the race became biennial), there were 17 starters and thereafter the numbers increased with 29 in 1939, 1947 (first post-war) and 1949. Numbers then rose to 42 in 1957, first year of the Admiral's Cup, 151 in 1965 and an all time maximum of 303 in 1979. The wide international participation meant that winners came from different nations: for instance there was no winner that was both British designed and owned, from 1953 when Sir Michael Newton's Robert Clark designed Favona was first overall, until 1975 when Golden Delicious owned by Peter Nicholson, designed by Camper and Nicholsons and sailed by the Bagnall twins, had best corrected time.

Numbers for the race in later years have steadied down to the middle 200s, which is about right for the organization with, for instance, a few below 250 in 1985, 1991, 1993 and 1995. 1997 saw 260 start in light weather and the course record broken by a multihull. As quantity improved over the years, so did passage times. George Martin's Jolie Brise, which won in 1925, took just six and one half days (4.0 knots); the current course monohull record, set in 1999 is 2 days 5 hours 8 minutes 51 seconds (11.38 knots) being held by RF Yachting (Ross Field, NZL). Multihulls have raced since 1997, resulting in the outright course record also in 1999 of 1 day 16 hours 27 minutes 0 seconds (14.96 knots) by Fujicolor II (Loock Peyron, FRA). More common in the Fastnet course are long beats to windward or patches of calm. However, unlike many of the world's race courses, it is impossible to define Fastnet weather (therefore happily impracticable to design a special kind of boat to win). For instance for 1981 (next after the 1979 storm) there was light weather; 1983 had light weather and some calm, but easterlies on the way home; 1985 was the worst weather since 1979 and resulted in a higher proportion of retirements than in the storm; 1987 was generally light, but with a 200-mile beat on the way home including a short blow; 1993 was a beat to the Fastnet rock and a run home; 1995 was very light with a moderate beat, freshening later, all the way back to Plymouth. 1997 started with fog and light air and ended in calms with moderate breezes in between. 1999 was light for many boats, but the leaders carried a fresh breeze. 2001 featured fast speeds for most of the course, but light air before the finish, and 2003 turned out to be a long race in mainly light airs.

The club began by using various premises for its meetings and dinners in London; by 1935 it had the use of rooms at 3 Old Burlington Street. By February 1936, the membership at about 600 was large enough to open a club house at 2 Pall Mall. In November 1940, the building received a direct hit from a bomb, the steward was killed and the club house destroyed. It was joined incidentally by the Royal Western Yacht Club within the year, burnt down by incendiaries. That club then moved nearer the water, as found at the end of many Fastnets afterwards. In due course a short lease was taken on a house at 20 St James's Place, but it was feared that any London club house might suffer the same fate. It nearly did, as the roof was then bomb damaged. After repair work by the members themselves, 20 St James's Place was opened on 23rd July 1942 by King Haakon of Norway. Of course, the club, thanks to the foresight of those wartime members, is still there, and in 1956 was enlarged by the purchase of number 19.

A major renovation began in 1993 resulting in extensively modernized accommodation for members, with redecorated bedrooms and private bathrooms. A modern telephone system was installed throughout the building for administration and for members' areas. As for the position of the club house at its select cul-de-sac in the West End, this remains beyond price. Those who were in charge in the year 1949 also had the wisdom to buy the freehold of the property. Among wartime activities were considerable hospitality to allied navies and a 32-35ft WL ocean racer design competition for prisoners of war. It was won by an RAF Flight-Lieutenant held in Oflag IVC.

In the few years prior to 1939, the number of races started by the club had expanded considerably. In 1930 there were 4 (Fastnet, Channel, Santander, Dinard); in 1934, 6; 1937, 8; 1938,10. 1937 was fairly typical, with Fastnet, Channel, Dinard, Heligoland, Maas, Southsea to Brixham, Ijmuiden to Solent and Solent to La Baule. In the 1980s, by contrast, the number of events averaged 17 per year, not counting short parts of modern inshore-offshore circuits. As further recounted below, the 1990s were to see even more race starts.

Unfortunately there is no space here to mention all the many members who have contributed so much to the progress of the club; some have reached flag rank and some not and the reader is referred to the pages with lists of previous officers and staff. But there was one giant of ocean racing, who gave a massive push to competitive sailing in Britain: Captain John H. Illingworth RN. He raised the standard of racing; he wrote a classic text book called Offshore; he revolutionized the rating rule and design; he challenged the Americans; he galvanized the French (too effectively some might say!); he started races overseas (Sydney-Hobart, Giraglia, sail training events and others), he showed that small yachts could race as daringly as big ones and he presented, with others, the Admiral's Cup, a private challenge for a three boat team of American yachts which might be visiting for Cowes Week and the Fastnet. He won, in Myth of Malham, (Fastnet overall winner 1947 and 1949), Mouse of Malham, Merle of Malham, Monk of Malham, Oryx and other yachts, simply scores of races.

From the first RORC race after the war, the Cowes to Dinard in September 1945 (with a destroyer escort to ensure yachts kept clear of the minefields) and for twenty years after that, came the club's greatest expansion. For one reason or another, yachtsmen decided that what, for want of a better name, are called cruiser-racers were the thing for racing. The old metre boat dominance disappeared and clubs around the coast began offering races for habitable handicap boats. The apex of these events was the annual programme of the RORC. Further, both in Britain and abroad, the challenging offshore courses improved vastly the design and construction of ocean racers. For a time it appeared that they were able to keep the sea in almost any weather. Owners and crews had, for what some see as this idyllic period, an ocean racer, a cruiser, somewhere to sleep in harbour, and an inshore racing boat, all in the same yacht. Such a vessel was manned by amateurs, probably members of the club, with the galley and chart table aft and of moderate displacement, so that the sail area could be reasonably handled.

As mentioned, the Admiral's Cup began as a private challenge in 1957, but in 1959 the club was asked to run the series and although the Americans did not return that year, Holland and France took part. The story was then one of continual expansion of the number of teams, which reached a maximum of 19 (57 boats) between 1977 and 1979. After 1985, in terms of the number of three boat teams, there was a decline as the kind of yacht needed to compete both offshore and in additional specified inshore courses (even Olympic or Olympic style layouts), became progressively more unusual and expensive, as did the paid crew. Commercial sponsorship of the series by a French company, Champagne Mumm, began in 1983, while the first British boat to be sponsored, rather than privately owned, appeared in 1991. The Admiral's Cup had become at its origin almost by accident (because the allotted courses were already in existence) a novel kind of yacht racing which combined inshore and offshore racing. It steadily became a model of its kind, spawning welcome imitators including the Southern Cross (Australia), the Onion Patch (NE USA), Hawaii (Kenwood) Cup, Sardinia Cup, the RORC/IOR Ton Cups and a range of regional and local competitions.

Back in 1945, following the death of George Martin, his partner in ownership of a gaff rig yacht called Griffin, H.E. West, had presented her to the club, so that provisional members and others without berths could gain ready access to races. In 1957, Owen Aisher and his co-owners made a free replacement with Yeoman, which had won the 1951 Fastnet. She was renamed Griffin II. Since then a number of yachts, each named Griffin has been acquired in turn by the club for training purposes. Again specialization and costs meant that times changed, so that the last Griffins were run for training by the then National Sailing Centre in association with the RORC. When the Centre converted to a private trust, the system was changed to supporting training with a fund rather than a specific yacht.

In 1970 the commodore and two advisers decided to start up a substantial publication for members with the title, Seahorse. It was first a quarterly, then a monthly. It has had two changes of ownership and copies have always been for sale to non-members. Established now for more than twenty-five years, it has evolved into an organ of first class yacht racing, not merely offshore.

From the earliest days the club has found it necessary to have some form of established and practical time allowance system to enable boats to join in the races. For the first Fastnet races with their elderly cruisers built to no rules, Malden Heckstall-Smith, brother of the famous 'Bookstall', who virtually ran British inshore yacht racing single-handed, was appointed 'club measurer'. He recommended a version of the old Boat Racing Association formula of 1912. It had in fact been derived by combining two earlier American rating rules, the Seawanhaka and the Universal. As the 'RORC rule' it was developed for the club's races through the thirties. From the beginning, Martin, Somerset and others were determined to have a measurement rule of some sort and not to depend upon observed performance. One description by Somerset stated that measurement was 'a very simple matter which can be done afloat in a few minutes'.

In 1928 the CCA began using this rule for the Bermuda race, but in 1932 split away to use an entirely different form of handicapping. The RORC was then on its own and such an efficient job did it do, that from 1945 other British clubs began to specify the RORC rule for their races and insisted that boats arrived with a certificate of measurement issued by the RORC. In those more modest days, the club was at first reluctant to allow other organizations to use its rule, but by the late fifties the club's rating rule and its equipment standards were widely used in Europe, Australia, New Zealand and elsewhere, though not in North and South America where US systems were bound to prevail. In 1957 there were major changes to the RORC rule, including the abandonment of the necessity to be able to take all measurements when afloat (on a mooring, for there were then no marinas in Britain). These changes involved the remeasurement of some 1200 boats. Since the mid-thirties there had also been quite different methods of time allowances in America and Britain. Since 1935 the RORC (followed ten years later by all other British clubs) deduced a time-on-time system (minutes per hour) for each yacht from her rating, while throughout the USA, time-on-distance (seconds-per-mile) remained read off from nationally agreed tables.

A number of reasons in the sixties led to initiatives to try and combine the RORC and American rules. Among these were continental pressures (particularly the 'Bremen meeting') against having to choose between two rules, talk of an ocean racing class in the Olympic games, which was thought to need a rating rule and the example of the IYRU, which had in 1952, after forty-five years, at last been joined by the USA. Successful American designs were beginning to appear to the RORC rule and US designers rather liked the way it was run.

London and the club house were a main focus of this international activity and it was there in November 1968 that a new combined rule, the International Offshore Rule, was announced. RORC members taking a leading role were E.P.De Guingand, a RORC flag officer and chairman of the co-ordinating committee, David Fayle and Robin Glover, RORC chief measurers, of whom there were no equivalents in the USA, Olin J. Stephens II and Dick Carter, American designers whose yachts were winning under both the RORC and American rules and David Edwards, commodore of the club at that vital period.

From 1971, the club used the IOR for all its races. Such a 'world rule' caused for a number of years an immense expansion in offshore racing and offshore boats. A major influence on the whole process was the One Ton Cup, an award owned by the Cercle de la Voile de Paris, used previously for the IYRU 6-metre class. The CVP had transferred it in 1965 to a fixed rating under the RORC rule with a few extras such as headroom and equipment to be carried; with the arrival of IOR, it was agreed to move it under the same concept to within IOR. Under the latter rule it provided intense annual international competition from 1971 until 1994. In 1998 the famous and remarkably handsome cup was allocated to a 45ft one-design class.

In its first decade, the IOR did look very much more like the old RORC rule than that of the CCA. In a kind of repeat of 1932, senior members of the latter club set up a project to create a new rating rule in America. Known as MHS, it came into use there in 1976 and was used for the 1980 Bermuda race, which was therefore once again on a different system from the Fastnet. Even under IOR, America had used time-on-distance and the British used time-on-time, which resulted in different perceptions of the IOR itself. A committee, which sat for several years attempting to reach a single compromise on time allowances, duly dissolved itself without finding a solution.

From about 1978, there were calls for the RORC to adopt a one-design, for those who did not wish to struggle with rating rules. The club preferred to welcome classes into its races and give prizes, but leave them in the hands of their owners' associations. One-designs to have competed regularly offshore in all lengths of race have included the Contessa 32, the OOD 34, the Sigma 33 and the Sigma 38, all built in England. In 1993 the club took its own one-design initiative with a 36ft flat out racer, designed and built in the USA, and nominated it as a compulsory team boat for the Admiral's Cups from 1995 to 1999. Sponsorship was involved and the class was named the Mumm 36. Expectations that the class would have wider use in the club's races were not realized.

In 1984 the club offered a second rating alongside the IOR, run from its own rating office following a suggestion from, and in partnership with, France's Union National du Course au Large. Known as the Channel Handicap System, it had the effect over several years of increasing race entries, especially in Fastnet races from 1989 onwards. It steadily grew until some 5400 were using the Rule world wide of which over 3000 are issued in England (for UK, Ireland and some other countries), far exceeding those that were measured in the most numerous days of IOR (about 1850 in UK and Ireland). For various reasons IOR fell into disuse; it was in practice unused by the club after 1993. For some it was a pity to see it go, for it had still included in its basic formulae the elements of the old RORC rule and earlier rules within that. From 1990 until 1999 the International Measurement System, previously the American MHS was also used for rating boats in the club's races. At the end of 1997, the club, in conjunction with UNCL, announced a revised rating system to be known as IR2000. As a result CHS was simply renamed IRC, but an additional published rule called IRM, intended for flat out racers, became effective from the 2000 season. However this initiative did not seem to appeal beyond a minority of racing yachts based in the central Solent. In 2003 IRC was accorded International status by ISAF, and continues to flourish. In 2004 some 6000 boats in 31 were racing under IRC. In 2004 the adoption of IRC by a number of US Clubs has seen the expansion of this popular Rule into the USA.

After eighty years of races, memorable and otherwise, campaigns at home and abroad, club life and activities, it would be strange if there had not been unwanted incidents and occurrences. Fatalities while racing have been few, but in ocean racing everywhere casualties happen from time to time. A man was lost overboard in the 1931 Fastnet and French sailors were lost in a Biscay race in the fifties. In 1956 many yachts were in serious difficulties in the "Channel race storm". Other individual cases did occur in the club's races, though it was in the 1979 Fastnet, in which five boats were abandoned and subsequently lost in extreme conditions, that there were fifteen fatalities. Many lessons were learned, which were enumerated in a formal inquiry instituted by the club and the national authority. Linked recommendations were to have a major effect on safety and equipment rules and some aspects of the conduct of racing.

The club racing is now on a two-year cycle with the Fastnet and the qualifiers necessary for it in each odd numbered year. For a typical 'even year' such as 2004 there was a revival of a race from the Solent to Cascais in Portugal, and a series in the Solent and offshore for three boat teams from around Britain and abroad for the Rolex Commodores' Cup. Some 20 events appeared on the annual programme, climaxed by the RORC racing division of the ARC race from Las Palmas, Canary Islands, to Rodney Bay, St Lucia. In the Mediterranean there was the Middle Sea race of 630 miles from Malta, the China Sea race of 650 miles was from Hong Kong to Manila and there was a non-stop 700-mile round Ireland event. Continental ports which marked the finish of races of various lengths included St Malo, Ostend, Scheveningen, Cherbourg, Le Havre, Dieppe and St Quay Portrieux. Multihulls, having been given a class briefly in the 1960s, were re-admitted in 1997 and then seemed set to continue.

It is a strange fact that the RORC has no equivalent in any other country (except possible the Nippon Ocean Racing Club, which with 6000 members and many outstations is more of an association for racing throughout Japan). Many clubs all over the world run a limited number of ocean races from their own bases, combined with other sailing activities. There is nothing with quite the appearance of the present day RORC race programme. By contrast various events spring up or are grafted on to race programmes, some being totally organized by a sponsor. When the great event is over, competitors disperse and no physical trace remains.

After eighty years, the message of the Royal Ocean Racing Club still carries a long way. With its bricks and mortar existence, its elected membership and its permanent professional staff, the club stands as a sentinel for the ideals of racing under sail at sea.

Sir Peter Johnson (d. 2004) wrote this history which has been amended up to date


RORC Race Headquarters Cowes, 82 High Street, Cowes, Isle of Wight PO31 7AJ. Tel: +44 (0) 1983 295144, fax: +44 (0) 20 7493 5252. Information: The Race Office in Cowes is only manned during races. Please try the numbers given for the London office outside otherwise.

RORC Rating Office (Seahorse Rating Ltd.), Seahorse Building, Bath Road, Lymington, Hampshire SO41 3SE, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 1590 677030, fax: +44 (0) 1590 679478 

Royal Ocean Racing Club (RORC), 20 St. James’s Place, London SW1A 1NN, UK. Tel: +44 (0) 20 7493 2248, fax: +44 (0) 20 7493 5252

(Details courtesy of the Royal Ocean Racing Club) 

Have we got your club details? Click here to get involved

Published in Clubs
28th July 2009

Mullaghmore Sailing Club

mullaghmoresc1.jpg Mullaghmore Sailing Club began in 1963 and ran mainly as a dinghy and cruiser club under the guidance of a founder member, the late Joan Malone's husband Paddy Malone. In terms of the Yacht and Sailing Club, we are a relatively new club. Initially MSC was composed largely of members from outside the area.

However, in the seventies and eighties, there had been a subtle change in the sport of sailing which encouraged the sport to embrace all.

This was reflected in a change of the clubs’ name from the old Mullaghmore Yacht Club to Mullaghmore Sailing Club. Simultaneously membership increased, a new Clubhouse was built (1999) and an emphasis was placed on Junior Sailing and Special Needs Sailing with a view to building up a broad youth base to enable the future development of MSC.

The last fifteen years has seen the club grow from its hedge school in the old pioneering days operating in the open at the north slip in the harbour to our clubhouse with its excellent facilities. Membership is healthy. Many of our youth and junior sailors have enjoyed and still are participating in and enjoying the varied challenges of the sport. Adults who have not sailed before are taking to the water on our evening courses for adults.

The biggest event MSC hosts is the Mullaghmore Triathlon which now firmly established on the Triathlon circuit. Started in 2001 it is now a big event which draws hundreds of competitors and spectators in June each year.

All income for the club's activities is re-invested in training and water sport events, a commitment that is specified in the articles of association of the club. Each year, in conjunction with the Sligo VEC, MSC runs up to six weeks of junior sail training courses for 30 to 40 young people each day over this period.

MSC also runs sailing and navigation training for adults, major provincial and national sailing events and power boat courses. As a Recognised Training Establishment (RTE) all its courses and activities are certified under the Irish Sailing Organisation (ISA). The club is also committed to including people with special needs on sailing courses and have through the Peace and Reconciliation fund have invested in specially adapted access boats.

New club facilities opened April 2000. Active dinghy sailing and racing in sheltered waters from April to October. Visitor moorings available for cruisers. Annual Cruiser Regatta held at the end of July. 

(Details and image courtesy of Mullaghmore Sailing Club)

Mullaghmore Sailing Club, c/o Andrea McElroy, Mullaghmore, Cliffoney, Co. Sligo. Email: [email protected]

Have we got your club details? Click here to get involved

 

Published in Clubs
28th July 2009

Fireball

The Fireball is a high performance two-person sailing dinghy offering exciting sailing, intense competition and a great social life off the water. For all the latest Fireball news click here. The thrills of trapeze and spinnakers are hard to match in any type of sailboat or board and neither age nor gender determines your ability to be competitive.

Fireballers sail all year round – during the Winter at the DMYC Frostbites in Dun Laoghaire and the during Summer at many events around the country and the DBSC Tuesdays and Saturdays again in Dun Laoghaire. In addition there are active fleets in Clontarf, Killaloe and Dunmore East. If you would like to sail then get in touch with one of the following people who will help you find a spot!

Siobhan Hayes, Dun Laoghaire – tel: 087 205 8879
Hugh Johnson, Clontarf – tel: 087 659 3533
Cormac Bradley, General – tel: 086 814 3618
Owen Laverty, Dun Laoghaire – tel: 087 6107857
Richard Fox, Killaloe – tel: 087 248 4977
Brian O'Neill, Ballyhenry – tel: +44 7849 465124

Irish Fireball Association, c/o Margaret Casey, Secretary, 48 Riverside Drive, Churchtown, Dublin 14. Email: [email protected]

 

Afloat's Graham Smith wrote, in the One Design Class Review for the February/March 2009 issue:

"The Fireball has been written off so many times yet consistently defies all obituaries. In fact, it has grown slightly over the years to provide a national fleet in the region of 70 boats at 15 venues which tends to substantiate its claim of being one of the leading dinghy classes in the country.

Twenty-eight boats at the Nationals in Westport was a little down on the previous year but entries in the mid-20s for the other regional events would be considered more than satisfactory by a lot of other classes in this day and age.

Noel Butler and Seamus Moore of DMYC retained their national title in Mayo, won the Ulsters in Carlingford and also won the Traveller’s Trophy for consistency of results. Fifteenth overall in the 68-boat World Championships in Thailand was a highly creditable finish for the Dun Laoghaire duo.

Another Dun Laoghaire crew, Kenneth Rumball and Dave Moran, had a seventh overall at the Europeans in Belgium while, at home, Andy Pearce and Francis Rowan of the National YC won the Leinsters in Mullingar and the Skerries helm Simon McGrotty notched wins in the Munsters and Open Championships with two different crew. National Champions: Noel Butler and Seamus Moore, DMYC." 

 
There is a space for Irish boating clubs and racing classes to use as their own bulletin board and forum for announcements and discussion. If you want to see a dedicated forum slot for your club or class, click here

Published in Classes & Assoc

dsc_04310_medium.jpg September League 2009 

 

Schull Harbour Sailing Club was founded in 1977 as a summer sailing club and from its inception it has activately promoted leisure and competitive sailing in Schull. The first commodore was Billy Pope who had sailed in the area from the fifties in his yacht Pendua. He was joined by his brother Teddy in Harbar.

In the early seventies Billy and his crew were instrumental in setting up Cape Clere regatta on the Wednesday before Schull Regatta.

Informal racing took place during the years 75/76 until a small committee drew up the first set of club rules.

The first clubhouse was a caravan, which was parked at the back of the stone beach, close to where the public toilets are now. This was used for many years, until the upgrade of the pier.

The first trophy was presented by Sean Barnett owner of Barnett’s Hotel for a club Fastnet Rock race and is still raced for every July.

The boats in the first race in addition to the Pope brothers were Michael Murphy’s Coral Ballerina, Ronnie Goods Tundercrest, George Dwyer’s Madcap, and Frank Godsons Lyre 11.

Additional boats quickly arrived with Paul Murray and Kit Pearson each purchasing an Offshore 8. Vincent O'Farrell arrived in his Elizabethan and Pat Whelan in his large Moody ketch, Charlene. Myles Ronan moved on from the Flying Fifteens, when he purchased Kiemar, and Al Bird campaigned his GK 24.

James O'Flynn and Tom O'Brien made a regular Saturday trip from Baltimore and Bill Hilliard sailed up from Rossbrin.

The number of races increased annually as each boat owner sponsored a race, and the season now runs from May to September.

A junior racing fleet quickly grew as the large number of member’s kids took to the water, and successful leagues and sail training courses were held over the years.

The club now organizes the successful Calves Week Regatta every August, having taken over the running of the event from the local Regatta Committee, and uses the impressive Fastnet Marine Center as its headquarters.

(Details and image courtesy of Schull Harbour Sailing Club)

 

Schull Harbour Sailing Club, Schull, Co. Cork, or c/o Michael Murphy, Vermont, Grange Road, Douglas, Co Cork. Tel: 021 429 1878, email: [email protected]

Have we got your club details? Click here to get involved

 

Published in Clubs
23rd July 2009

Irish RC Laser Class

Whether you are brand new to sailing, new to model sailing, an old salt, or a championship match-racing sailor, the RC Laser is the boat for you.

Sail almost anywhere – The RC Laser has a 16" keel. So anywhere you find knee-deep water, she will sail. Sail in the ocean, a pond or lake, a river or stream – or in your swimming pool, it makes no difference. The RC Laser sails beautifully in conditions from a zephyr up to 35 knots of wind – no joke!

Pedigree – The RC Laser is the design of world famous sailor and yacht designer Bruce Kirby. Of all his creations, the one-man Laser is the best known. Over 174,000 have been built to date, making the Laser the most popular racing class of all time, and an Olympic Class.

The RC Laser is a quarter scale model of that Laser with certain modifications for model performance – all carefully designed and tested by Bruce Kirby and Jon Elmaleh – another world class sailor.

This means the RC Laser has a pedigree, is proven and tested. It is not a toy designed by a toy company. When you sail this boat, the right things happen. If you make a mistake, it bails you out and keeps on sailing. You don't need to worry about breaking the boat, and you won't be disappointed with how well she sails.

An equal opportunity sailboat – the RC Laser is for kids, for adults, for seniors, even for the physically handicapped. She is the boat of choice for sailing schools and rental fleets because she is practically indestructible and very easy to handle. Plus she is a true one-design for competitive sailors that want to go for the gold.             

RC Laser sailors do have more fun! – it's true. RC Lasers are such reliable boats, you will be sailing when others have their boats ashore for repairs or adjustments. While you sail with the kids, others will be hiding their boat from their kids. Toughness, reliability, simplicity, and all weather capability means more fun!

No add-on expenses – The RC Laser comes complete so there are no hidden expenses. You even get four different color rolls of vinyl tape for your own creative boat markings.

We do offer a few accessories that folks have asked for, like a carrying bag, a folding cradle, and a rechargeable battery system. But the bottom line is, all you really need is 12 AA batteries for your radio control equipment and you are ready to sail right out of the box. Isn't that great?

(The above information courtesy of the Irish RC Laser Class). 

Irish RC Laser Class c/o Roger Bannon, President, Valentia, 36 Castlepark Road, Dalkey, Co. Dublin. Tel: 01 235 1812/087 650 4925, email: [email protected] or [email protected] 

There is a space for Irish boating clubs and racing classes to use as their own bulletin board and forum for announcements and discussion. If you want to see a dedicated forum slot for your club or class, click here 

Published in Classes & Assoc

In March 2009, Afloat's Graham Smith had this to say about the Flying Fifteens: "With the European Championships in Kinsale, it was a big year for the Irish F15 class which represented the bulk of the 56-boat fleet at the south coast venue. Britain’s Steve Goacher won the event with Darren Martin and Simon Murray of Strangford Lough YC the best of the local contingent. Click here for all the latest Flying Fifteen news.

It was a good year for the Whiterock pair who also won the Southern and Northern championships while the SLYC domination was completed with the two other regionals, the Easterns and Westerns, going to clubmates Roger Chamberlain and Brian McKee respectively.

More SLYC success seemed on the cards when the Nationals were held at Whiterock but just to upset the odds, Dave Gorman and Chris Doorly of the National YC stole all the thunder and emerged as the new Irish Champions. Twenty-six boats – up on the previous year – contested the top event from a total national fleet of approximately 160 boats found in 16 clubs and a few other locations around the country.

Next year (2010) is the 40th anniversary of the Dun Laoghaire F15 fleet. National Champion as at March 2009: David Gorman and Chris Doorly, National YC" 

 

A brief history of the Flying Fifteen Fleet within Ireland, courtesy of The Flying Fifteen Association of Ireland

Extracts have been taken from a document called ‘The Dun Laoghaire Flying Fifteen Fleet, The First 25 Years 1970–1995’, written by Peter O'Shea in June 1995. Thanks to Sean Nolan for acquiring a copy for the webmaster.

1948 – Three yachts built in quick succession at the Medina Yacht Yard at Cowes. The class was known as Dainty Ducks and changed to Flying Fifteens with the characteristic fortissimo lettering
 
1949 – The Flying Fifteen Association of Great Britain was formed, first secretary Squadron Leader Charles Nance.
 
1949 – Uffa Fox meets Prince Philip HRH Duke of Edinburgh, they became firm friends and frequently sailed together.
 
1950 – The people of Cowes present Prince Philip with his own Flying Fifteen ‘Coweslip’.
 
1954 – First hulls built from GRP produced in the UK.
 
1962 – Australian Flying Fifteen Association founded in Western Australia with Tally Hobbs as President and G.J. Sassella as secretary.
 
1963 – ‘Ffolly’ (no. 215), brought to Dublin by David Newmark. DBSC (Dublin Bay Sailing Club) agreed to give a start after much negotiation about  seaworthiness of the Flying Fifteen class. Jack Owens crewed on ‘Ffolly’ for the first three years. The hull was a Tormentor hull, which was the Windibank of the day. This is possibly the first Irish Flying Fifteen.

1968 – Irish Flying Fifteen seen moored alongside the Royal Irish Yacht Club. It appeared to be an all timber, varnished boat, with a turtle deck forward. This was built by Albert Foley, in a joinery works in Phibsboro, in the mid 60s, registered as number 1269, and called ‘Squalus’, to join the fleet in 1970, owned by Timothy Orr.

1969 – A summer of heavy winds in Dublin Bay. Arthur Lavery and Teddy (Bryan S.) Ryan spotted a fleet of Flying Fifteens sailing with comparative ease at Dinghy Week in Baltimore, while other classes were struggling in the inner harbour. Teddy Ryan and Arthur Lavery led the campaign to start a class in Dun Laoghaire, a minimum of 7 boats were required for a DBSC start. Teddy Ryan sailed in a ‘Copland’ Fifteen at Kinsale, which was imported by Bill Godkin. Teddy Ryan bought ‘Little Lady’ (no. 1092) at the agreed price of £634, including sails and trailer. Advertisement appeared in the Irish Times. On seeing the ad, Sean Nolan cancelled an order for a Mermaid in favour of a Flying Fifteen.  Bill Godkin was accepting multiple orders for Flying Fifteens.
Inaugural Meeting of the new Flying Fifteen Fleet in Dun Laoghaire was held on 24th September 1969.

1970 – The Flying Fifteen class started in DBSC as a result of Arthur Lavery's interest in the boat. Bryan S. Ryan agreed to front the start-up. They got the initial owners together as per this picture that appeared in the Irish Independent on 8-January-1970.

1970 – Initial eight boats from the Godkin yard were as follows:
‘Little Lady’, number 1092, owned by Teddy Ryan
‘Siobhan’, number 1257, owned by Arthur Lavery
‘Susele’, number 1258, owned by Michael Halpenny
‘Frankie’, number 1259, owned by Ronnie Kavanagh
‘Ffaoilean’, number 1260, owned by Jack Owens
‘Bonnie’, number 1262, owned by Noel O'Hare
‘Nicjac’, number 1263, owned by Sean Nolan
‘Fferocity’, number 1265, owned by Tony Neiland; and
‘Squalus’, number 1296, owned by Timothy Orr

1970 – First DLFF committee was elected:
Captain - Bryan S Ryan
Vice Captain - Noel O'Hare
Treasurer - Ronnie Kavanagh
Record Keeper - Jack Owens
Secretary - Michael Halpenny
The annual subscription was £1.00 (one pound)

1972 – Fleet trophies were presented: ‘Chase Trophy’ presented by Anthony Kenny; and ‘Flying Fifteen Gun’ presented by Michael Halpenny

1972 – Death of Uffa Fox, aged 74 (1898 - 1972).
 
1979 – ‘Mid Week Cup’ presented by Kevin Blake

1980 to 1990 – A decade of development and tightening of tolerances to achieve a Standard Hull shape based on the designs of the British yacht designer Roy Windebank. This decade also saw the introduction of exotic fibres in yacht construction such as carbon fibre, kevlar and honeycomb cores of nomex.
 
1982 – Sinking of ‘Gaffer’ Eric Colin, sailing ‘Gaffer’ (no. 2383), crewed by John McCambridge was racing in May near Dalkey Island, when they broached and filled the boat with water. ‘Gaffer’ could not be bailed out or righted, and just stayed afloat long enough for Eric and John to step aboard a passing cruiser ‘Nuit St. George’. ‘Gaffer’ was never seen again. Tom O'Connor wrote a 24-verse poem about the incident.

1982 – The fleet bank account was opened. Previously fleet money was held by the treasurer, in his/her own bank accounts.

1983 – 6 new boats to the fleet. Jack Roy bought ‘Frankie’, Jerry O'Neill bought 1261 now called ‘Bluebell’. Ray Duggan arrived with 1343 ‘Osprey’. David Algeo arrived with 2130 ‘Folklore II’. Some boats were disqualified from racing due to not meeting the safety standards National Yacht Club invests in an Electric Winch, allowing for the boats to come off the moorings and onto the hard for dry sailing and storage.

1984–1985 – Arrival of the Windibank. The National Yacht Club burnt down in 1984. Also seen was the first appearance of the Windibank hull. ‘Frizby’ (no. 2929) bought by Jack Roy and ‘Mary Foo’ (no. 2924) bought by Jerry O'Neill. ‘An Chuileann’ (no. 2937) owned by Maurice Byrne was bought and listed in 1985. Eric Colin and John McCambridge return to the fleet in ‘Ffootless’ (no. 2619), aptly named by the previous owners of ‘Gaffer’.

1984 – Jack Roy and Mal Nolan came 19th overall in the Worlds held in Kinsale. Dermot Baker, who owned ‘Shillelagh’ (no. 2463) presented the ‘Hells Gate’ trophy for the best boat in Olympic courses.

1985 – Computerised results now available for the Fleet events. Teddy Ryan responsible for introducing the system, with Ward Phillips taking over due to his speciality in computing. Westport SC newly formed, with results showing connections. NYC Regatta very rough, with several boats towed back into the harbour.

1985 – This year marked the sad loss of Noel O'Hare, who had stopped sailing since 1982, but had maintained contact with the fleet. Noel had been awarded title of ‘Mr. Personality of the Fleet’, as well as being a top class sailor. Noel was one of the founder members of the fleet.

1986 – Change of direction, under the Captaincy of Jack ‘Bligh’ Roy, shows introduction of Dry Sailing and Olympic Courses. Training course and lectures were setup and taken very seriously. The day of the ‘light hearted event’ had come to an end. Motivation for doing this was the Irish Championship to be held in the National yacht Club. Gerry Dunleavy and Roger Bannon gave freely of their time for tuning help. records indicate Gerry had been doing this since 1979. Roger Bannon and John Davies sailing in ‘Strange Magic’ (no 3037) won the Irish Championship, with Gerry Dunleavy and David O'Brien in ‘The Real Thing’ (no. 3108) coming in 3rd place. This was the last sailing year for Teddy Ryan, sailing in ‘Little Lady II’ (no, 2292). Teddy wanted to move to something bigger and drier. Heineken sponsored the fleet with £1,700. Roger Bannon's ‘Black Magic’ was exhibited at the boat show

1986 – Hurricane Charlie – 25/26 August 1986 brought Hurricane Charlie to the shores of Ireland. Considerable damage occurred to Dun Laoghaire boats, with 6 Flying Fifteens wrecked on the moorings by loose boats running through them. On the 26th the National Yacht Club slip was littered with bits and pieces of boats.

1986 – Flying Fifteen Association of Ireland (FFAI) was formed, with Jim Rodgers from the North as the first president and Jack Roy as Secretary.

1987 – ‘Ramtaffer trophy’ was presented to the fleet by Roddy and Jill. Roddy had retired from work and was re-locating to Scotland to setup a sailing school. Maurice Byrne (Captain during 1987) threw a Captain's party in his house, of such lavishness, complete with a group of four singers. the incoming captain, Ray Duggan, was seen with a very worried look on his face, and was heard enquiring if the Dubliner's would be expensive to hire for the night.

1987 saw the introduction of the ‘Gold’ and ‘Silver’ fleets. The intention was for a fair division of the spoils at the prize giving's. This did not stop the grumblings for some of the people.

1988 – Ray Duggan, Captain and author of the very witty fleet newsletters. Gerry Dunleavy becomes the British National Champion, sailing on the Clyde in ‘The Real Thing’ (no. 3108). His crew was David O'Brien. He went on to sail in the World Championship and achieved 9th place overall. Dun Laoghaire Motor Yacht Club hosted the East Coast Championship. Bray Flying Fifteen fleet started. Work continues on the plans to bring the 1992 World Championship to Ireland. Michael Horgan chaired a committee. The event was to be run by the National Yacht Club and not the Dun Laoghaire Flying Fifteen fleet. Jack Roy, Mal Nowlan, Paddy Lynch and Martin McCarthy were all heavily involved in planning, publicity, sponsorship and advice.

1990 – Handicap system for Gold/Silver/bronze fleets seemed to work well for championship events.
National Championships held in Westport again, due to the success of the same event the previous year. Heavy weather event was won by Gerry Dunleavy, crewed by Margaret Conway. East Coast Championship, sponsored by Heineken, was another heavy weather event, with Saturday blown out. It also signifies the sinking of another Flying Fifteen in Dublin Bay, by unlike ‘Gaffer’ it was seen again, strewn all over the strand in Sandymount.

1991 – World Championship (in Ireland) just around the corner. Training sessions arranged by special committee under Michael Horgan. Restrictions put in place to avert ‘cheque book’ sailing. Seven qualifying places allocated to Irish Boats

1992 – World Championships held in Ireland. Hosted by the National Yacht Club, the flying fifteen fleet worked hard to organise the event. 75 entrants, some from overseas. Irish National Championships preceded the event.
First Irish boat, sailed by John Lavery (son of Arthur Lavery) came in 20th position. Justin Burke came in 21st position.

1993 – Final introduction of hull measuring templates with reduced tolerances.
 
1993 – SailPower Marine of WA import the Windebank Mould X and commence production.
 
1993 – ‘Ffinally’ (no. 3352), sailed by Eric Cooney and Gabriel Greer, turns turtle in Dublin Bay, when hit by a sudden gust. The mast got stuck in mud, with the keel upright in the air. A passing Glen fired off a flare, alerting the rescue helicopter (already out doing drills) to come and rescue the two boys. Eric and Gabriel were pulled to safety and deposited on the East Pier. A Club launch was hi-jacked and the rescue operation was started. ‘Ffinally’ was discovered, upright, and sailing off on it's own through Dalkey Sound. The boat was sailed back single handed by Eric. The only damage done was a bent mast.

1994 – Death of a much loved Jill Hermon, who sailed with Roddy, and also assisted with fleet social activities.

1995 – 25th Anniversary  of the DLFF fleet. ‘Ffaoilean’ (no. 1260), one of the founding boats still in the fleet. Fleet size is 25 boats. ‘Ffangs’ (no. 3495) is the newest boat, owned by Justin Burke. Gerry Dunleavy has just received a brand new Ovington, unnamed or registered at time of writing.

1997 – 50th Anniversary, celebrated with a World Championships in Cowes, UK.

1998 – Final introduction of keel measurement templates with reduced tolerances.
 
1999 – Twelfth World Championships at Esperance Bay Yacht Club, WA
 
2001 – Flying Fifteen fleets established in South Australia at Goolwa and Adelaide.
 
2006 – Flying Fifteen World Championship held in the National Yacht Club, Dun Laoghaire

Flying Fifteen Association of Ireland

There is a space for Irish boating clubs and racing classes to use as their own bulletin board and forum for announcements and discussion. If you want to see a dedicated forum slot for your club or class, click here

 

Flying Fifteen International

History of the Flying Fifteen

Designed by the legendary Uffa Fox, the 6m (20ft) Flying Fifteen has maintained its reputation as an exciting and competitive two-man racing craft. It provides access to sailing at reasonable prices for men and women from 15 to 75 and beyond.

The most famous Flying Fifteen is “Coweslip” presented to the Duke of Edinburgh and Princess Elizabeth as a wedding present. Uffa Fox and Prince Philip frequently sailed together at Cowes.

The Flying Fifteen has been modernised over the years with Uffa Fox agreeing to changes towards the end of his life to improve the design specification and sail plan. By this time, the class had established itself in a number of countries and when John Calvert-Jones came from Australia and won the UK championships, the stimulus was provided for the move to seek international status. Under the guidance of Tom Ratcliffe, an International Federation of Flying Fifteen Associations was formed by nine countries from four continents. The first world championships were held in Perth, Australia in 1979 and subsequently have alternated between the Northern and Southern hemispheres biennially. The first European Championship took place in Spain in May 2004

(Above history courtesy of Flying Fifteen International website)

 

Published in Classes & Assoc
22nd July 2009

Laser SB3 Ireland

Laser SB3 Ireland is the class association for the largest and newest Irish keelboat class. We have over 90 boats in Galway, Lough Derg, Dunmore East, Cork, Kinsale, Belfast Lough, Howth and Dun Laoghaire. We represent the full spectrum of age, (ranging from 20 to 70+) and skill sets (from Olympians to occasional club sailors) playing at all levels for big trophies throughout the country. We have five regional championships each year and vibrant local racing too.

What about the boat?
It’s as much fun you can have at 16 miles an hour. The SB3 is fast, furious and fun – but surprisingly stable and easy to sail. In the light stuff it sails upwind beautifully and is tactical downwind, in the heavy it’s a beast uphill and a roaring pleasure the other way. It’s truly one design – the best sailors always win, which, perhaps, is not so good for the rest of us – but the fun makes up for it. It’s added value, to most, is that is can be rigged quickly, towed by a normal family car, has a great price point and, finally, it can be both slip and crane launched.

What to do and who to talk to?
If you are interested in getting involved we can help. Contact your local fleet captain from the list on the contact page page and they can organise a test drive, recommend second hand boats and generally tell you all about it. If you’re new, selected members of the class will also help you get started with tips and tricks sessions.

We’ll see you on the water!

Laser SB3 Ireland, c/o Joseph Hughes, Class Chairman, 4 Clanbrassil Terrace, Dublin 8. Tel. 087 747 8883, email: [email protected]

There is a space for Irish boating clubs and racing classes to use as their own bulletin board and forum for announcements and discussion. If you want to see a dedicated forum slot for your club or class, click here

Published in Classes & Assoc
22nd July 2009

IDRA 14 Class Association

idra.jpgFirst raced in 1946 and now fitted with a trapeze and spinnaker, the two-person IDRA 14 remains one of the most popular adult dinghy classes in Dublin Bay. ISA affiliated

# LOA: 14Ft
# SA: 110 SQ. FT
# Spinnaker: 140 SQ FT
# Hull Wt: 325lbs (min) 

 

Afloat's Graham Smith wrote about the IDRA 14 in March 2009: "The same clubs in three locations also actively promote the classic clinker-built IDRA14 and 34 boats continue to enjoy their racing at club and open meeting level. Two boats, built in 1947 and 1950 respectively, rejoined the class in 2008 after remarkable restoration work by their owners.

Despite being a Dublin-based class, it does like to travel and last year saw a dozen boats head to Carlingford for the Northerns where Pat O’Neill and Rick Morris of Clontarf took the title.

Almost twice that number – 65% of the national fleet – were attracted to Sligo for the National Championships where Sutton’s Alan Carr and Aoibhin de Burca took the honours in the Gold Fleet and clubmates Gordon Kelly and Mark Masterson headed the Silver Fleet.

Carr and de Burca also won the October Series and Gerry O’Hanlon and Paul McNally sailed their beautifully re-built Charmain to victory in the IDRA Open at Clontarf. The IDRAs’ sister class in the UK, the Dragonflies, celebrates its 60th anniversary next year and a contingent of the 14s will travel to Suffolk to help mark the occasion. National Champions (2009): Alan Carr and Aobhin de Burca, Sutton DC."

 

IDRA 14 Class Association, IDRA 14 Class Commodore, c/o 126 Ballinteer Close, Dublin 16. Tel: 086 155 8632, email: [email protected]

or

Jennifer Byrne, Secretary, 2 Spencer Villas, Glenageary, Co Dublin. Tel: 01 2802131, email: [email protected]

 

There is a space for Irish boating clubs and racing classes to use as their own bulletin board and forum for announcements and discussion. If you want to see a dedicated forum slot for your club or class, click here

Published in Classes & Assoc
22nd July 2009

Galway Bay Sailing Club

ukoppynats09.jpgLeft: Irish U–12 Squad at UK Optimist Nationals

Galway Bay Sailing Club is based in Renville Oranmore, approximately 7 miles from Galway City. The club is renowned for the warm welcome it extends to its members and visitors alike. It organises and facilitates the racing and sailing of dinghies, cruisers and multihulls for adults and junior members. The club also offers training and instruction to adults, juniors and non-members.

The clubhouse with bar and catering facilities opens on Sundays afternoons and also Tuesday and Wednesday nights from April to September to facilitate the various racing fleets During the remaining months it opens on Sundays for dinghy racing and on Wednesday nights for talks and social events. The club has played host to many successful Regional and National Regattas with racing taking place against the backdrop of beautiful Galway Bay.

Galway Bay Sailing Club (GBSC), Rinville, Oranmore, Co. Galway

(Details and image courtesy of Galway Bay Sailing Club) 

Have we got your club details? Click here to get involved

Published in Clubs
Page 68 of 76

Featured Sailing School

INSS sidebutton

Featured Clubs

dbsc mainbutton
Howth Yacht Club
Kinsale Yacht Club
National Yacht Club
Royal Cork Yacht Club
Royal Irish Yacht club
Royal Saint George Yacht Club

Featured Brokers

leinster sidebutton

Featured Webcams

Featured Car Brands

subaru sidebutton

Featured Associations

ISA sidebutton dob
ICRA
isora sidebutton

Featured Events 2020

Wave button for Afloat new dates

Featured Sailmakers

northsails sidebutton
uksails sidebutton

quantum sidebutton

Featured Chandleries

CHMarine Afloat logo
osm sidebutton
https://afloat.ie/resources/marine-industry-news/viking-marine

Featured Marinas

dlmarina sidebutton

Featured Blogs

W M Nixon - Sailing on Saturday
podcast sidebutton
mansfield sidebutton
BSB sidebutton
sellingboat sidebutton

Please show your support for Afloat by donating