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Displaying items by tag: Coastguard

The Summer Holidays are nearly here - have fun and stay safe at the seaside
With the school holidays fast approaching, NI Coastguards are encouraging children to stay safe whilst at the beach and along the coast.
Last month, Northern Ireland Coastguards dealt with a number of incidents that involved young people being overwhelmed by the power of the sea or being cut off by the tide. Some young people have attempted to swim to islands but have underestimated the strength of tides and the distance that they need to swim.
The Coastguard would like to encourage young people to stay within their depth and to check tide times before they arrive at the beach.
Coastguard Sector Manager Gordon Munro says,
"We'd like everyone who visits our coast to have a great time. So before you go check out the weather and the tide times (these can often be found at the entrance to the beach). That way you can ensure that the tide doesn't take you by surprise and that you don’t get cut off.
"Inflatable boats and toys can be great fun, but we’d rather that you used them in swimming pools than at the beach. If you do use one at the beach, make sure that it is tethered to an adult and never use it if there is an offshore wind. Inflatables can so easily be blown off shore, then overturn.
Make sure that children are supervised properly by adults. We deal with numerous cases of lost children every year and it can be very distressing for children and adults alike.
Try to go to a lifeguarded beach if you can and stay within the flagged area.

If you notice that someone is in difficulty, either alert the lifeguard if one is available or call the Coastguard on 999.
Finally, have a great time and return home safely."
If you want to prepare for your day out on the coast, you might like to visit Directgov for Kids where there are games and activities for children. Visit http://kids.direct.gov.uk/ andclickontheworld,thengotothe'watchstation'inthe'places'icon.

With the school holidays fast approaching, NI Coastguards are encouraging children to stay safe whilst at the beach and along the coast.

Last month, Northern Ireland Coastguards dealt with a number of incidents that involved young people being overwhelmed by the power of the sea or being cut off by the tide. Some young people have attempted to swim to islands but have underestimated the strength of tides and the distance that they need to swim.

The Coastguard would like to encourage young people to stay within their depth and to check tide times before they arrive at the beach.Coastguard Sector Manager Gordon Munro says,"We'd like everyone who visits our coast to have a great time.

So before you go check out the weather and the tide times (these can often be found at the entrance to the beach).

That way you can ensure that the tide doesn't take you by surprise and that you don’t get cut off."Inflatable boats and toys can be great fun, but we’d rather that you used them in swimming pools than at the beach. If you do use one at the beach, make sure that it is tethered to an adult and never use it if there is an offshore wind. Inflatables can so easily be blown off shore, then overturn.Make sure that children are supervised properly by adults.

We deal with numerous cases of lost children every year and it can be very distressing for children and adults alike.Try to go to a lifeguarded beach if you can and stay within the flagged area.If you notice that someone is in difficulty, either alert the lifeguard if one is available or call the Coastguard on 999.Finally, have a great time and return home safely."If you want to prepare for your day out on the coast, you might like to visit Directgov for Kids where there are games and activities for children. Visit http://kids.direct.gov.uk/ 

Published in Marine Warning

A lone sailor in the Irish Sea who was rescued south of Mumbles yesterday with no power and almost no safety equipment on board has just been rescued again after setting out for the second time and once again losing engine power, this time off Rhoose Point.

At quarter past eight yesterday the male on board the yacht 'Stravaig' contacted Swansea Coastguard to inform them that he had lost all electrical power and was drifting nine miles south of Mumbles Head. The man had no navigation lights, and only a mobile phone with a very low battery as a communications device. The only navigational equipment he had was a handheld GPS which also was very low on battery.

The Mumbles RNLI lifeboat was launched to the 12 metre yacht and towed her in to Mumbles. A second lifeboat also assisted with her mooring.

Almost exactly 24 hours later, at ten past eight this evening, Swansea Coastguard received another call from the same yacht, reporting that it had again run out of power. This time the Barry Dock lifeboat has been sent to tow the vessel back in to Barry. Barry Coastguard Rescue Team will meet the vessel in order to give the sailor advice on how to safely continue his journey.

Dave Jones, Swansea Coastguard Watch Manager said:

"When we give out safety advice to people going out for a trip in a yacht we recommend that people take adequate communications and navigational devices, flares, and check their engines. Unfortunately, this man followed none of this advice and set out not once, but twice, knowing that he did not have sufficient power to reach his destination.

All of the rescue resources tasked to this man's two rescues have been volunteers and we hope that the yachtsman will consider full equipping and preparing his vessel before continue his journey in order that we do not have to send them out to his rescue for a third time."

Published in Coastguard
Belfast Coastguard have been co-ordinating assistance to a man who fell into the sea by rocks near Bloody Bridge in Newcastle, County Down earlier this afternoon.

 The first report was that the man had been fishing and was clinging on to the rocks in order to save himself. He was unable to be reached from the shoreline.

The Newcastle Coastguard Team, recently trained in swift water rescue, was quickly on scene and a team member, John Lowry, suitably equipped was assisted down to the man to help him stay close to the rocks whilst further assistance from the local inshore lifeboat was requested.

Once taken ashore he was delivered into the waiting arms of paramedics at the harbour and taken to hospital by ambulance.

Alan Pritchard, Duty Watch Manager at Belfast Coastguard said:

"Seemingly the man had been in water for quite some time. He had fallen in and was clinging to rocks. Our first informant was a passer by who just happened to hear his calls. The man in the water was very close to letting go of rock, so John, our Coastguard Team Station Officer with our new water rescue equipment went in to hold him, and the casualty was very hypothermic when he came out of the water. We'd like to congratulate John for his outstanding efforts in rescuing this fisherman in the finest Coastguard traditions."

Published in Coastguard
Tagged under

The UK 406 EPIRB Registry based at MRCC Falmouth reached a new milestone this month by registering their 40,000th beacon, meaning the database has doubled in size in three years. The team has worked tirelessly to provide good customer service and maintain operationally valid records and as such the Registry is well respected throughout the SAR world.

The importance of the 406 MHZ beacon was highlighted by the safe rescue of four people from the Yacht Hollinsclough in the deep Southern Atlantic recently. The vessel had two correctly registered beacons which supplied key data to both national and international search and rescue authorities.

Steve Huxley, SAR Communications Manager said:

If you are a boat owner, consider buying an emergency beacon as part of the life- saving equipment fit to your vessel.

Emergency Position Indicating Radio Beacons have proved many times that they have contributed to the saving of lives.


Published in Coastguard

Following a report of a flare tonight, an extensive search of an area west of Cork Harbour was conducted but nothing was found and the search was called off. Emergency services had received reports of a red flare seen at Rocky Bay, west of Cork Harbour.  RNLI lifeboats from Kinsale, Crosshaven and Ballycotton and the Waterford based Coastguard helicopter, Rescue 117, were launched to investigate the sightings.  

Published in Coastguard

At 12.00 noon yesterday Holyhead Coastguard on the Irish Sea received a 999 call from an Aberffraw resident reporting that a woman had come to her house and asked that the Coastguard be alerted to a person in difficulty off Traeth Mawr. The person’s craft had capsized but no further information was forthcoming.


Whilst still gathering initial information, Trearddur Bay RNLI Lifeboat, RAF Rescue Helicopter 122 and Rhosneigr Coastguard Rescue Team were sent to the scene.

Shortly afterwards the helicopter reported that they were recovering a person from the water who they would be taking to Ysbyty Gwynedd, Bangor.


It seems that the 33 year old man had been in a kayak which had capsized off Traeth Mawr.  Due to the strong ebb flow from Aberffraw Estuary he could not reach the shore safely. The helicopter crew advised that there was no evidence that the man had been wearing a lifejacket or buoyancy aid.


Jim Paton, Holyhead Rescue Coordination Centre Manager says:


“Sadly, the kayaker was later confirmed as deceased.  We would recommend that anyone undertaking these kinds of activities wears a buoyancy aid"

Published in Coastguard
Tagged under

A man has been rescued from the River Tweed after falling from a ladder whilst boarding his angling boat. Lynda Bell, watch officer at Humber Coastguard says:


 We received a 999 call at 11.40 this morning reporting that the man had fallen in the water and asking for assistance. The caller had heard the man shouting for help and we could still hear him shouting for help in the background as the 999 call was made.


 “We requested the Berwick RNLI inshore lifeboat to launch and it was soon on scene picking the man up from the water.


"The 69 year old, who is from the Berwick area, was wearing a lifejacket so this meant that we were able to recover him from the water very quickly.  He also did exactly the right thing by shouting for help as soon as he entered the water. After a quick check over by ambulance paramedics he was allowed home.


“This incident shows just how crucial a lifejacket can be.  It can mean the difference between a swift and simple rescue or a protracted search with a possible fatal outcome.  Please remember to wear your lifejacket.  It’s useless unless worn.”

Published in Rescue
Page 48 of 48

Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard is Ireland's 4th Blue Light service (along with An Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service). It provides a nationwide maritime emergency organisation as well as a variety of services to shipping and other government agencies.

The purpose of the Irish Coast Guard is to promote safety and security standards, and by doing so, prevent as far as possible, the loss of life at sea, and on inland waters, mountains and caves, and to provide effective emergency response services and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The Irish Coast Guard has responsibility for Ireland's system of marine communications, surveillance and emergency management in Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and certain inland waterways.

It is responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue and counter-pollution and ship casualty operations. It also has responsibility for vessel traffic monitoring.

Operations in respect of maritime security, illegal drug trafficking, illegal migration and fisheries enforcement are co-ordinated by other bodies within the Irish Government.

Introduction

On average, each year, the Irish Coast Guard is expected to:

  • handle 3,000 marine emergencies
  • assist 4,500 people and save about 200 lives
  • task Coast Guard helicopters on missions around 2000 times (40 times to assist mountain rescues and 200 times to carry out aeromedical HEMS missions on behalf of the HSE), Coast Guard volunteer units will respond 1000 times and RNLI and community lifeboats will be tasked by our Coordination Centres about 950 times
  • evacuate medical patients off our Islands to hospital on 100 occasions
  • assist other nations' Coast Guards about 200 times
  • make around 6,000 maritime safety broadcasts to shipping, fishing and leisure craft users
  • carry out a safety on the water campaign that targets primary schools and leisure craft users, including at sea and beach patrols
  • investigate approximately 50 maritime pollution reports

The Coast Guard has been around in some form in Ireland since 1908.

List of Coast Guard Units in Ireland

  • Achill, Co. Mayo
  • Ardmore, Co. Waterford
  • Arklow, Co. Wicklow
  • Ballybunion, Co. Kerry
  • Ballycotton, Co. Cork
  • Ballyglass, Co. Mayo
  • Bonmahon, Co. Waterford
  • Bunbeg, Co. Donegal
  • Carnsore, Co. Wexford
  • Castlefreake, Co. Cork
  • Castletownbere, Co. Cork
  • Cleggan, Co. Galway
  • Clogherhead, Co. Louth
  • Costelloe Bay, Co. Galway
  • Courtown, Co. Wexford
  • Crosshaven, Co. Cork
  • Curracloe, Co. Wexford
  • Dingle, Co. Kerry
  • Doolin, Co. Clare
  • Drogheda, Co. Louth
  • Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
  • Dunmore East, Co. Waterford
  • Fethard, Co. Wexford
  • Glandore, Co. Cork
  • Glenderry, Co. Kerry
  • Goleen, Co. Cork
  • Greencastle, Co. Donegal
  • Greenore, Co. Louth
  • Greystones, Co. Wicklow
  • Guileen, Co. Cork
  • Howth, Co. Dublin
  • Kilkee, Co. Clare
  • Killala, Co. Mayo
  • Killybegs, Co. Donegal
  • Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
  • Knightstown, Co. Kerry
  • Mulroy, Co. Donegal
  • North Aran, Co. Galway
  • Old Head Of Kinsale, Co. Cork
  • Oysterhaven, Co. Cork
  • Rosslare, Co. Wexford
  • Seven Heads, Co. Cork
  • Skerries, Co. Dublin
  • Summercove, Co. Cork
  • Toe Head, Co. Cork
  • Tory Island, Co. Donegal
  • Tramore, Co. Waterford
  • Waterville, Co. Kerry
  • Westport, Co. Mayo
  • Wicklow
  • Youghal, Co. Cork

The roles of the Irish Coast Guard

The main roles of the Irish Coast Guard are to rescue people from danger at sea or on land, to organise immediate medical transport and to assist boats and ships within the country's jurisdiction.

Each year the Irish Coast Guard co-ordinates the response to thousands of incidents at sea and on the cliffs and beaches of Ireland. It does this through its Marine Rescue Centres which are currently based in:

  • Dublin
  • Malin Head (Co Donegal)
  • Valentia Island (Co Kerry).

Each centre is responsible for search and rescue operations.

The Dublin National Maritime Operations Centre (NMOC) provides marine search and rescue response services and co-ordinates the response to marine casualty incidents within the Irish Pollution Responsibility Zone/EEZ.

The Marine Rescue Sub Centre (MRSC) Valentia and MRSC Malin Head are 24/7 centres co-ordinating search and rescue response in their areas of responsibility.

The Marine Rescue Sub Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for routine operational matters in the area between Ballycotton and Clifden.

MRSC Malin Head is the contact point for routine operational matters in the area between Clifden and Lough Foyle.

MRCC Dublin is the contact point for routine operational matters in the area between Carlingford Lough and Ballycotton.

Each MRCC/MRSC broadcasts maritime safety information on VHF and, in some cases, MF radio in accordance with published schedules.

Maritime safety information that is broadcast by the three Marine Rescue Sub-centres includes:

  • navigational warnings as issued by the UK Hydrographic Office
  • gale warnings, shipping forecasts, local inshore forecasts, strong wind warnings and small craft warnings as issued by the Irish Meteorological Office.

Coast Guard helicopters

The Irish Coast Guard has contracted five medium-lift Sikorsky Search and Rescue helicopters deployed at bases in Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo.

The helicopters are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours and 45 minutes at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice based at Waterford.

These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties).

They can also be used for assistance in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations as authorised by the Coast Guard within appropriate regulations.

The Coast Guard can contract specialised aerial surveillance or dispersant spraying aircraft at short notice internationally.

Helicopter tasks include:

  • the location of marine and aviation incident survivors by homing onto aviation and marine radio distress transmissions, by guidance from other agencies, and by visual, electronic and electro-optical search
  • the evacuation of survivors from the sea, and medical evacuees from all manner of vessels including high-sided passenger and cargo vessels and from the islands
  • the evacuation of personnel from ships facing potential disaster
  • search and or rescue in mountainous areas, caves, rivers, lakes and waterways
  • the transport of offshore fire-fighters (MFRTs) or ambulance teams (MARTs) and their equipment following a request for assistance
  • the provision of safety cover for other search and rescue units including other Marine Emergency Service helicopters
  • pollution, casualty and salvage inspections and surveillance and the transport of associated personnel and equipment
  • inter-agency training in all relevant aspects of the primary role
  • onshore emergency medical service, including evacuation and air ambulance tasks
  • relief of the islands and of areas suffering from flooding or deep snow

The secondary roles of the helicopter are:

  • the exercise of the primary search, rescue and evacuation roles in adjacent search and rescue regions
  • assistance to onshore emergency services, such as in the evacuation of high-rise buildings
  • public safety awareness displays and demonstrations
  • providing helicopter expertise for seminars and training courses

The Irish Coast Guard provides aeronautical assets for search and rescue in the mountains of Ireland. Requests for Irish Coast Guard assets are made to the Marine Rescue Centres.

Requests are accepted from An Garda Síochána and nominated persons in Mountain Rescue Teams.

Information courtesy of Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (July 2019)

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