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Displaying items by tag: Feva

17 RS Feva dinghies participated in the latest round of coaching for the class at Greystones Sailing Club at the weekend writes Garett Donnelly. Conditions were perfect with coaching provided for all the sailors ranging in age from 11 to 17 years of age.

Sailors from Greystones, RStGYC, RIYC, Bray SC, Malahide YC and Howth YC took part.

Next up on the Feva 2017 calendar is coaching in Malahide Yacht Club from 8th to 10th April and then Howth Yacht Club for coaching on 19,20,21.

The Eastern Championships follow on 22 and 23 April. Entry for the Easterns is here.

Published in RS Sailing

The RS Feva class is seeking to repeat its great turnout of 38 boats at the 2016 Greystones Sailing Club hosted National Championships. 'There is no reason why we can’t achieve similar numbers at our events this year', according to upbeat class officers. 

The opening Feva event at Howth Yacht Club in April will also have the RS200, RS400, SB20 and National 18 fleets taking part. 

2017 Irish RS Feva Events Calendar

April 22,23 Easterns Howth YC
May 13,14 Northerns RNIYC
July 1,2 Southerns RCYC (as part of Dinghyfest)
July 14,15,16 Nationals RStGYC
July 21-27 Worlds Holland
Aug 12,13 Inlands Blessington SC

Published in RS Sailing

A rejuvenated Irish RS Feva fleet mustered nearly 40 boats for its national championships at Greystones Sailing Club in County Wicklow today.

After three races in a blustery 18–knots, Welsh youth visitors Eddie and Kevin Farrell of Llandudno Sailing Club lead by a margin of three points having won the first two races.

Full results on the RS Feva facebook page here

Racing continues tomorrow. 

Published in RS Sailing

#rssailing – The Royal Cork Yacht Club was buzzing at the weekend, with what was a great precursor to next year's dinghy week. The RS fleets were in town for their final event of what has been a bumper Irish calendar full of well attended competitive and fun events by David Rose (RS-Association Ireland).

Tents were being welcomed and pitched on the lawn, and dinghies were arriving in great numbers on the Friday night and Sat morning. The weather was playing ball and giving us wind and the impression that it was still summer. The red carpet was rolled out by a club that draws on its people and facilities to run top class events in a really friendly way. Small details make these occasions and there was little left undone, with shore helpers and soup waiting at the top of the slip for competitors, and a few free pints to help ease the aching bones on the Saturday night. Celine McGrath not only ran the event ashore but also helped on board the OOD boat during the racing. Results were hitting the website as the boats were finishing, just another detail that makes a noticeable difference.
Barry Rose was our race officer and employed the great help of a top notch team, including Ciaran Mc Sweeney who had ran an excellent RS sprint event earlier in the year out of MBSC, and RCYC's Eddie Rice who along with the rest of the team provided exceptional racing, with no delays of any kind all weekend. The course was changed so fast when needed that the competitors hardly noticed, and everything from course length to the quality of the line was impeccable.
First order of business for Barry and his team was to decide which of the many race area's available in Cork would best suit the forecast on Saturday, and after going out on a rib before the briefing, he established that the conditions outside Roches Point, with a small swell and a nice breeze would provide the best racing.
The 40 teams in their double handed dinghies made a fantastic sight snaking out the Owenabue River and around Camden and then Roches to do battle on Sat Morning. When they arrived they found a course ready to go and once the last competitors had arrived, racing got under way in brilliant conditions that allowed for surfing downwind and good tactical upwind racing.

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RS400 Race Report: 21 Teams, 6 Races, One discard

Race one saw RCYC's David Rose and Ian Hef lead the way for two rounds on home turf, until being reeled in and passed by John Downey and Sandy Rimmington (MBSC) and the ever present Sean Cleary and Steven Tyner on the final beat.
Race two saw National Champions Alex Barry and Richie Leonard record a bullet followed by Dave Cheyne and Stephen Kane (NDLL) who would remain consistent for the remainder of the regatta and gain a podium position of 3rd place overall.
Race three was all about Sean Cleary and Steven Tyner (GSC) who have had a fantastic season, including winning the Eastern's and recording a very credible 10th at the UK Nationals. For most of the race, they were challenged hard by John Downey and Sandy Rimmington, but there challenge was to end abruptly in a post weather mark incident that resembled losing a front wing in a formula one car. When the dust settled John's bowsprit was broken and they had to limp home in luckily for them the final race of the opening day.
Overnight Andrew Alego and P. Nolan (RSGYC) were well placed as was Andy Verso and Oisn Baugh (GSC). The racing had been close and there was a lot to play for on day two.
On day two Barry Rose decided that with a bigger swell and more breeze forecast it was prudent to race the fleet in harbour. Cuskinny is a great place to race with a strong easterly, and despite a more tidal race course, it was a great call, allowing the fleets to get in 3 more exhilarating races in great breeze, watched by a flotilla of motor boats and yachts that came out to see these exciting fleets in action.
Alex Barry and Richie Leonard had a fantastic battle with Sean Cleary and Steve Tyner in race four, and this would prove to the be order of business for the day.
David Rose and Ian Hef were back in the mix recording a two and a three in race five and six to finish fourth overall. Dave Cheyne and Stephen Kane were excellent in the conditions and a third and two sixths would earning them a well-deserved third overall.
For the top honours there was little between Alex and Richie and Sean and Steve, both teams battled hard all day, overtaking each other many times. This was a tight affair with no shortage of drama, including a swim in Race five for Alex and Richie, which they recovered from admirably.
Sean and Steve on "Yachtsman Euromarine" were in poll position going into the last race, but the margin was slim and Alex and Richie knew if they could overhaul their competitors in the final race they would win on count back, and that is ultimately what happened.
Alex Barry and Richie Leonard are 2014 Southern Champions.
Alex Barry's post event observation:
"It is very exciting to see RS dinghy sailing hitting great heights at the moment in Ireland. I hope to see the fleets in Cork again next year for Dinghy week. Thanks for great organisation and race management and to the RCYC for a great weekend."

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RS200 Race Report: 12 Teams, 6 Races, One discard

A good turnout for the final event of the season for the 200 fleet, made for some very competitive racing, and we may see a cork fleet develop next season in this exciting class. Ronan O'Driscoll and Shane Dunlea are sailing out of MBSC and many heads were turned in the RCYC at the weekend, by a boat that combines high performance and well worked out systems that are easy to use.
Day one was all about Marty O'Leary and Rachel Williamson (RSGYC), who mastered the conditions and dominated the fleet with a clean sweep of three race wins from three on day one. Marty had made the move from competing well in the 400 with Brian Fenlon recording an 8th at the Nationals in Galway this year.
Blair Stanaway and Heather King (RSGYC/Westport) were hanging in there with two seconds and a third to open, as were Stephen Craig and Conor Foley (RSGYC) with two thirds and a second.
It was to be more of the same from Marty and Rachel on day two, recording an impressive fourth race win from four, before allowing Blair and Heather to win the fifth race. Marty and Rachel however had now won the RS200 Southern title with a race to spare in a superb first outing.
Second was Blair and Heather two points back and third was Stephen Craig and Conor Foley a further five points adrift.
The 200 is a newer boat than the 400 and has a lower weight band being similar but slightly less powerful. The fleet in the UK is very large and strong, allowing easy access to affordable and fast second hand boats. There are also demo boats available in Ireland so please enquire if you are interested in getting involved. We are expecting growth next year country wide in this exciting class.

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RSFeva Race Report: 9 Teams, 6 Races, One discard

The Feva class was full of RCYC competitors, making up over fifty percent of entries.
One of the bigger challenges of Day one was getting out to the race course through the tidal rush and sea one often gets in the entry to Cork harbour.
Once out there, the Feva's started an exciting series that saw Lorcan Tighe and Cian Murphy of NYC winning race one, with Dara Donnelly and Rosemar Tyrell (NYC/RIYC) second.
Donnelly and Tyrell were to finish second in the other two races of the day and were level on points with Sarah Cudmore and Kelly Williams (RCYC) after day one. Sarah and Kelly won race two and three and established themselves as favourites.
Day two, and to the in-harbour course and more wind. It was business as usual for Sarah Cudmore and Kelly Williams winning a further two races and taking the championship in fine style with a race to spare. Lorcan Tighe and Cian Murphey who sailed really well to three seconds on the Sunday were second overall, three points clear of Dara Donnelly and Rosemar Tyrell in Third. Suzi Fitzpatrick and Aine Riche (RCYC) won the final race to sit fourth.
Other honours went to first lady crew in the 400, Laura Holohan, she finished sixth overall with helm Paul McMahon. Sheela Lewis took first lady Helm and 14th overall in the 400 (John Lewis crewing). In the 200 Sarah Byrne took top lady Helm (crewed by Tom Gillan) and champion Rachel Williamson also took home top lady crew in the 200 (Marty O'Leary at the helm).

See here for full results

Published in RS Sailing

#rssailing – The first event of the season proved to be a testing one for all. After the first days squally conditions which saw the Fevas getting in only one race the Sunday dawned relatively benign.

Overall results are available to download below.

All launched around 10.30 and racing got underway with a full compliment of sailors on the water. Two races were finished in near perfect conditions with a lovely force 3-4.

The third race swiftly descended into the survival conditions which we had seen on the Saturday and it became increasingly obvious that there were more hulls than sails to be seen throughout the three fleets.

Most pairings however came ashore with broad smiles whether they had finished the race or not delighted with the fun and the blasting reaches which more often than not had ended with a swim.

Top Feva pairing of Alison Dolan and Grainne Young from BISC/NYC added to their first of Saturday with an 8th and another two firsts leaving them clear leaders.

Behind them the fleet was very tightly bunched with only a point separating the next three Emer Rafferty/Laura Coleman RSGYC , Alice Brennan/Isobel O'Grady GSC, and Triona Hinkson/Helen O'Beirne RSGYC.

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Feva girls Alison Dolan and Grainne Young

In the RS200s it was old time pairing of Marshall King and Heather King who took the honours with Frank O'Rourke and son Kevin in second. Third and first junior was Stephen Craig and Conor Foley. First lady prize went to Lisa Smith ably crewed by Megan Hayes.

Newcomer to the fleet and ex Enterprise and Laser sailor Chris Arrowsmith was there with his son Greg mixing it up a bit on the Sunday to make it an interesting day.

The 400s with a great showing of 26 boats were won by a single point by local boys Sean Cleary and Steve Tyner proving that consistency pays, counting three seconds a third and a fourth. Just behind them was Alex Barry with George Kenefick form MBSC/RCYC and Bob Espey/Michael Gunning BYC, again with only 3 points to separate them. Local men Simon Herriott/Sprinkles Moran were just behind in 4th

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Greystones pairing Sean Cleary and Steve Tyner were RS400 winners

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Counting five wins Heather and Marshall King walked away with the RS200 prizes

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Three wins gave Feva girls Alison Dolan and Grainne Young the overall win

All in all it was an extremely successful event especially so early in the season and all thanks goes to Greystones Sailing Club for pulling out all the stops to make it happen. Thanks goes also to long suffering PRO Neil Murphy who had to contend with extremely shifty and squally conditions throughout the two days, and still managed to pull off a full series of 6 races place sealing a great weekend for the local fleet.

rsfleetateasterns

 

Published in RS Sailing
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#rsfeva – Following successful events together last year the RS Feva is now joining the RS200 and RS400 classes under the Irish RS Class Association umbrella. This makes the three classes a true double-hander pathway much as the Laser is for singlehanders.

The Feva/200/400 pathway caters for all ages and weights to compete and socialise at the same events.

The Irish season kicks off shortly with the Easterns at Greystones, April 12/13th and a Training event will be announced soon.

The Feva Europeans are on this year in Bruinesse, Holland from May 29th – 31st and the Worlds are on in Carnac, France from 25th July to 1st August.

Two excellent and accessible venues and a great opportunity to get up to speed before the Crewsaver Irish RS Nationals in Galway starting Friday 8th August.

Published in RS Sailing
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#RSsailing – The RS Association has announced its event calendar for 2014. These events include all three RS classes, the Feva, 200 and 400 unless otherwise specified. 

Primary RS circuit events:

April 12/13th Greystones S.C. Eastern Championships.
June 21/22nd Strangford Lough S.C. Northern Championships.
July 19/20th Lough Ree Y.C. Western Championships.
August 8-10th Galway Bay S.C. Crewsaver Irish National Championships.
September 13/14th Kinsale Y.C. Southern Championships.

Sprint events:
May 24/25th Ballyholme Y.C. RS200/400 Sprint event.
June 7th Monkstown Bay RSFeva/200/400 Southern Sprint event.

UK/European events:

July 25 – August 1st Carnac, France Feva Worlds

July 27th – August 1st Fraglia vela Riva, Lake Garda, Italy RS 200/400 Eurocup
August 17th – 21st Hayling Island, UK RS200 UK Nationals
August 24 – 28th Mounts Bay, Cornwall UK RS400 UK Nationals.

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RS – After five races sailed Robert Espey and Mike Gunning won the RS400 Northern championships hosted by Ballyholme Yacht Club this weekend.

Despite the absence of wind forecast, and despite Charlie Horder not showing up, the weekend turned out to be a roaring success, with ever reliable Robin Gray as PRO slotting the perfect duration races into the various wind slots that existed, giving the three fleets great racing.

It was exciting to see some new faces in the RS Fevas, since McCready Sailboats took over dealership, and have been promoting and lending out boats. All 6 of the boats, in the fleet that normally travels from Dublin or Greystones, were from the North. This must augur well for the future, with several parents present realising they could have actually have been sailing in the 400s instead of acting as shore crew.

In the RS200s, Clive Coffey from Newcastle, was dominant in the generally f2-3 conditions, taking first overall from Greystones regulars Frank O'Rourke in second, and Sarah Byrne in fourth, with East Down's Trevor Fisher splitting them in third.

The main event though was in the RS400s, where a super strong line up including current Irish Olympic 49er sailors, and winners of this year's Weymouth Sail for Gold World Cup Series' Championship, Ryan Seaton and Matty McGovern headlined a strong line up of past National and European Championship winners from a multitude of classes. Racing was tight, with the front 6 or 7 generally working through, but with anyone capable of making a podium slot. Overnight it looked to be all about Bob Espey vs Emmet Ryan, but Sunday saw things get a lot tighter, with Gareth Flannigan and Dave Cheyne staying consistent, and nearly turning things around in race two, when Flannigan's lead was slashed on the final run of race two, in what would prove a decisive moment, allowing the Olympic duo a little breathing space as the 3rd,4th and 5th boats rolled the leading pair on the final approach, Espey grabbing an essential win. Race 4 saw Emmet and brother James struggle and take a discard, so it was advantage Espey/ Gunning again.

Race 5 was held in sparkling Ballyholme sea breeze and sunshine, with Dave Cheyne and Stevie Kane from RNIYC breaking clear of the pack, chasing the Ryan brothers. As the two teams extended, it looked like the goose was cooked for Espey, but a last attack on the right corner gybe allowed the fat old boys from Royal North to roll Ryan, and take the win. This instantly threw the result back to Espey and Gunning, who were suddenly back level on points, but with a pair of bullets, to the Ryans only one now, the title went to Espey in dramatic fashion, and past Irish Champions Emmet and James left to lick their wounds. Awesome racing as ever, with some new faces feeling the heat, as those new in last season starting to move up the leader board after a year of hard racing under their belts.

Lots of new boats arriving by the week, with several more expected in Ballyholme in time for the Autumn Grange Wine Merchants Series at Bangor on Sundays from the 8th September, before the fleets head to Crosshaven on September 21/22nd. The hope is the 4 or 5 potential new 400 owners in Monkstown SC in Cobh will have boat boats in time, to compliment the new arrival of Aidan Macsweeney, and also Dave Doherty who currently have boats in the area.

Full results for all divisions are downloadable below as an attached html file.

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#feva – Ireland's Laura Gilmore and Molly Fekkes have finished 41st overall, a drop of eight places in the closing stages of the regatta, counting a poor result in the penultimate race in a massive 171–boat fleet. There was a splendid final day's racing at the Compagnia della vela Grosseto dell'RS Feva Worlds 2013 with Great Britain sweeping the boards with all three podium positions. Bristow/Hewitt are new World Champions. Italy fourth with former winners Stocchero/Virgenti, while Porro/Dall'Ora take All Girls title. 

It was an all-British finale today at the Compagnia della vela Grosseto-hosted RS Feva World Championship 2013 with all three steps of the podium occupied by duos from across the English Channel. The new World Champions after 14 races are young Hanna Bristow and Bobby Hewitt (GBR 4610) of Leigh and Lowton YC who controlled their nearest rivals' every move in a 240° wind blowing at 10 knots. They took home a seventh and a 12th-place finish that saw them end the week with a total score of 34 points.

A good 21 points behind them in second place are their fellow countrymen Wells/Todd (GBR 4332), who take the silver medal on 55 points, just one ahead of Brown/Davies (GBR 4768), on the third step on 56 points. Unfortunately, the Italian former World Champions Stocchero/Virgenti did not make it to the podium and, as a result of a 16th and a 3rd place on this final day's racing, had to content themselves with the wooden medal on a score of 75 points. Brits Grade/Prescott also ended up 5th on 77 points ahead of the Italians Porro/Dall'Ora. The winners of the qualifiers, however, can rejoice in having taken the All Girls prize for female crews while the Family prize went to Will and Matt Taylor.

The standings for the other two fleets were also British-dominated with Vennis-Ozanne/Lewis topping the Silver standings ahead of Italians Tognoni/Quilici and Mulcahy/Lindsay-Brown dominating the Bronze.

RS Feva World Championship – Final Standings Gold - Top 5
Complete standings available from: www.sailwave.com/results/RSFevaWorlds2013.htm
The first score awarded for the qualifiers (cannot be discarded)

1. GBR 4610 - Hannah Bristow / Bobby Hewitt - Leigh and Lowton - 3, 3, 1, 6, 1, 1, (14), 7, 12 - 34 points
2. GBR 4332 - Elliot Wells / Jake Todd - Hayling Island Sailing Club - 2, 2, 2, (23), 3, 5, 7, 20, 14 - 55 pt
3. GBR 4768 - Arthur Brown / Niamh Davies - Royal Burnham YC - 9, 1, (17), 10, 6, 6, 1, 6, 17 - 56 pt
4. ITA 4698 - Leonardo Stocchero / Gianluca Virgenti - CV Toscolano Maderno - 5, 7, 9, 13, (58 BDF), 14, 8, 16, 3 - 75 pt
5. GBR 4924 - Samuel Grade / Katie Prescott - Lymington Town/Hayling Island - 25, 6, 4, 1, (58 BFD), 4, 6, 11, 20 - 77 pt

Full results here

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#Feva – On the final day of the RS Feva World Championship 2013, Ireland's Laura Gilmore and Molly Fekkes from Northern Ireland lie 33rd over all in the 171–boat fleet. 

The penultimate day of racing at the RS Feva World Championship 2013 at the Compagnia della vela Grosseto was dominated by the British teams. With four races held for each fleet (260° wind, 8 knots rising to 14 in the afternoon), there are now four British teams in the top four positions in the Gold standings which will decide the new World Champions.

The new leaders are Hannah Bristow and Bobby Hewitt (GBR 4610) on 15 points as a result of two wins and a 14th-place finish delivered today. Their performance pushed fellow Brits Wells/Todd (BGR 4332) back to second with 21 points (3,5,7) ahead of fellow countrymen Brown/Davies (GBR 4768) in third on 33 points (6,6,1).

This edged the Italian teams off the podium with Margherita Porro and Francesca Andrea Dall'Ora (Associazione Nautica Sebina) slipping into 4th position (46 points) after taking an 8th, a 10th and a 2nd position today, although they are solidly placed at the top of the women's standings. Behind them in 5th are still more British sailors, Grade/Prescott (46 points) followed for now by the reigning World Champions Leonardo Stocchero and Gianluca Virgenti (CV Toscolano Maderno), on 56 points after a very up-and-down day indeed (BDF,14,8).

The Brits are also dominating the other two fleets with Ozanne/Lewis leading in the Silver and Strauss/Mitchell in the Bronze.

Tomorrow will see the two final Gold races being staged (along with three for the Silver and the Bronze), starting at 11:55. Once the racing on the water is over, the prize-giving ceremony for the Bronze, Silver and Gold winners will take place on the Compagnia della vela Grosseto with the announcement of the new RS Feva World Champion.

RS Feva World Championship – Provisional Gold standings after 6 finals- Top 5
Complete provisional standings* available from: www.sailwave.com/results/RSFevaWorlds2013.htm
The first points figure was awarded after qualifiers (cannot be discarded)

1. GBR 4610 - Hannah Bristow / Bobby Hewitt - Leigh and Lowton - 3, 3, 1, 6, 1, 1, (14) - 15 points
2. GBR 4332 - Elliot Wells / Jake Todd - Hayling Island Sailing Club - 2, 2, 2, (23), 3, 5, 7 - 21 pt
3. GBR 4768 - Arthur Brown / Niamh Davies - Royal Burnham YC - 9, 1, (17), 10, 6, 6, 1 - 33 pt
4. ITA 2592 - Margherita Porro / Francesca Andrea Dall'Ora - A.N. Sebina - 1, 4, 21, (49), 8, 10, 2 - 46 pt
5. GBR 4924 - Samuel Grade / Katie Prescott - Lymington Town/Hayling Island - 25, 6, 4, 1, (58 BFD), 4, 6 - 46 pt

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The Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard is Ireland's fourth 'Blue Light' service (along with An Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service). It provides a nationwide maritime emergency organisation as well as a variety of services to shipping and other government agencies.

The purpose of the Irish Coast Guard is to promote safety and security standards, and by doing so, prevent as far as possible, the loss of life at sea, and on inland waters, mountains and caves, and to provide effective emergency response services and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The Irish Coast Guard has responsibility for Ireland's system of marine communications, surveillance and emergency management in Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and certain inland waterways.

It is responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue and counter-pollution and ship casualty operations. It also has responsibility for vessel traffic monitoring.

Operations in respect of maritime security, illegal drug trafficking, illegal migration and fisheries enforcement are co-ordinated by other bodies within the Irish Government.

On average, each year, the Irish Coast Guard is expected to:

  • handle 3,000 marine emergencies
  • assist 4,500 people and save about 200 lives
  • task Coast Guard helicopters on missions

The Coast Guard has been around in some form in Ireland since 1908.

Coast Guard helicopters

The Irish Coast Guard has contracted five medium-lift Sikorsky Search and Rescue helicopters deployed at bases in Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo.

The helicopters are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours and 45 minutes at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice based at Waterford.

These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties).

They can also be used for assistance in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations as authorised by the Coast Guard within appropriate regulations.

Irish Coastguard FAQs

The Irish Coast Guard provides nationwide maritime emergency response, while also promoting safety and security standards. It aims to prevent the loss of life at sea, on inland waters, on mountains and in caves; and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The main role of the Irish Coast Guard is to rescue people from danger at sea or on land, to organise immediate medical transport and to assist boats and ships within the country's jurisdiction. It has three marine rescue centres in Dublin, Malin Head, Co Donegal, and Valentia Island, Co Kerry. The Dublin National Maritime Operations centre provides marine search and rescue responses and coordinates the response to marine casualty incidents with the Irish exclusive economic zone (EEZ).

Yes, effectively, it is the fourth "blue light" service. The Marine Rescue Sub-Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for the coastal area between Ballycotton, Co Cork and Clifden, Co Galway. At the same time, the MRSC Malin Head covers the area between Clifden and Lough Foyle. Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC) Dublin covers Carlingford Lough, Co Louth to Ballycotton, Co Cork. Each MRCC/MRSC also broadcasts maritime safety information on VHF and MF radio, including navigational and gale warnings, shipping forecasts, local inshore forecasts, strong wind warnings and small craft warnings.

The Irish Coast Guard handles about 3,000 marine emergencies annually, and assists 4,500 people - saving an estimated 200 lives, according to the Department of Transport. In 2016, Irish Coast Guard helicopters completed 1,000 missions in a single year for the first time.

Yes, Irish Coast Guard helicopters evacuate medical patients from offshore islands to hospital on average about 100 times a year. In September 2017, the Department of Health announced that search and rescue pilots who work 24-hour duties would not be expected to perform any inter-hospital patient transfers. The Air Corps flies the Emergency Aeromedical Service, established in 2012 and using an AW139 twin-engine helicopter. Known by its call sign "Air Corps 112", it airlifted its 3,000th patient in autumn 2020.

The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the British Maritime and Coastguard Agency, which is responsible for the Northern Irish coast.

The Irish Coast Guard is a State-funded service, with both paid management personnel and volunteers, and is under the auspices of the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport. It is allocated approximately 74 million euro annually in funding, some 85 per cent of which pays for a helicopter contract that costs 60 million euro annually. The overall funding figure is "variable", an Oireachtas committee was told in 2019. Other significant expenditure items include volunteer training exercises, equipment, maintenance, renewal, and information technology.

The Irish Coast Guard has four search and rescue helicopter bases at Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo, run on a contract worth 50 million euro annually with an additional 10 million euro in costs by CHC Ireland. It provides five medium-lift Sikorsky S-92 helicopters and trained crew. The 44 Irish Coast Guard coastal units with 1,000 volunteers are classed as onshore search units, with 23 of the 44 units having rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) and 17 units having cliff rescue capability. The Irish Coast Guard has 60 buildings in total around the coast, and units have search vehicles fitted with blue lights, all-terrain vehicles or quads, first aid equipment, generators and area lighting, search equipment, marine radios, pyrotechnics and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Community Rescue Boats Ireland also provide lifeboats and crews to assist in search and rescue. The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the Garda Siochána, National Ambulance Service, Naval Service and Air Corps, Civil Defence, while fishing vessels, ships and other craft at sea offer assistance in search operations.

The helicopters are designated as airborne from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours, and 45 minutes at night. The aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, on inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains and cover the 32 counties. They can also assist in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and can transport offshore firefighters and ambulance teams. The Irish Coast Guard volunteers units are expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time of departing from the station house in ten minutes from notification during daylight and 20 minutes at night. They are also expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time to the scene of the incident in less than 60 minutes from notification by day and 75 minutes at night, subject to geographical limitations.

Units are managed by an officer-in-charge (three stripes on the uniform) and a deputy officer in charge (two stripes). Each team is trained in search skills, first aid, setting up helicopter landing sites and a range of maritime skills, while certain units are also trained in cliff rescue.

Volunteers receive an allowance for time spent on exercises and call-outs. What is the difference between the Irish Coast Guard and the RNLI? The RNLI is a registered charity which has been saving lives at sea since 1824, and runs a 24/7 volunteer lifeboat service around the British and Irish coasts. It is a declared asset of the British Maritime and Coast Guard Agency and the Irish Coast Guard. Community Rescue Boats Ireland is a community rescue network of volunteers under the auspices of Water Safety Ireland.

No, it does not charge for rescue and nor do the RNLI or Community Rescue Boats Ireland.

The marine rescue centres maintain 19 VHF voice and DSC radio sites around the Irish coastline and a digital paging system. There are two VHF repeater test sites, four MF radio sites and two NAVTEX transmitter sites. Does Ireland have a national search and rescue plan? The first national search and rescue plan was published in July, 2019. It establishes the national framework for the overall development, deployment and improvement of search and rescue services within the Irish Search and Rescue Region and to meet domestic and international commitments. The purpose of the national search and rescue plan is to promote a planned and nationally coordinated search and rescue response to persons in distress at sea, in the air or on land.

Yes, the Irish Coast Guard is responsible for responding to spills of oil and other hazardous substances with the Irish pollution responsibility zone, along with providing an effective response to marine casualties and monitoring or intervening in marine salvage operations. It provides and maintains a 24-hour marine pollution notification at the three marine rescue centres. It coordinates exercises and tests of national and local pollution response plans.

The first Irish Coast Guard volunteer to die on duty was Caitriona Lucas, a highly trained member of the Doolin Coast Guard unit, while assisting in a search for a missing man by the Kilkee unit in September 2016. Six months later, four Irish Coast Guard helicopter crew – Dara Fitzpatrick, Mark Duffy, Paul Ormsby and Ciarán Smith -died when their Sikorsky S-92 struck Blackrock island off the Mayo coast on March 14, 2017. The Dublin-based Rescue 116 crew were providing "top cover" or communications for a medical emergency off the west coast and had been approaching Blacksod to refuel. Up until the five fatalities, the Irish Coast Guard recorded that more than a million "man hours" had been spent on more than 30,000 rescue missions since 1991.

Several investigations were initiated into each incident. The Marine Casualty Investigation Board was critical of the Irish Coast Guard in its final report into the death of Caitriona Lucas, while a separate Health and Safety Authority investigation has been completed, but not published. The Air Accident Investigation Unit final report into the Rescue 116 helicopter crash has not yet been published.

The Irish Coast Guard in its present form dates back to 1991, when the Irish Marine Emergency Service was formed after a campaign initiated by Dr Joan McGinley to improve air/sea rescue services on the west Irish coast. Before Irish independence, the British Admiralty was responsible for a Coast Guard (formerly the Water Guard or Preventative Boat Service) dating back to 1809. The West Coast Search and Rescue Action Committee was initiated with a public meeting in Killybegs, Co Donegal, in 1988 and the group was so effective that a Government report was commissioned, which recommended setting up a new division of the Department of the Marine to run the Marine Rescue Co-Ordination Centre (MRCC), then based at Shannon, along with the existing coast radio service, and coast and cliff rescue. A medium-range helicopter base was established at Shannon within two years. Initially, the base was served by the Air Corps.

The first director of what was then IMES was Capt Liam Kirwan, who had spent 20 years at sea and latterly worked with the Marine Survey Office. Capt Kirwan transformed a poorly funded voluntary coast and cliff rescue service into a trained network of cliff and sea rescue units – largely voluntary, but with paid management. The MRCC was relocated from Shannon to an IMES headquarters at the then Department of the Marine (now Department of Transport) in Leeson Lane, Dublin. The coast radio stations at Valentia, Co Kerry, and Malin Head, Co Donegal, became marine rescue-sub-centres.

The current director is Chris Reynolds, who has been in place since August 2007 and was formerly with the Naval Service. He has been seconded to the head of mission with the EUCAP Somalia - which has a mandate to enhance Somalia's maritime civilian law enforcement capacity – since January 2019.

  • Achill, Co. Mayo
  • Ardmore, Co. Waterford
  • Arklow, Co. Wicklow
  • Ballybunion, Co. Kerry
  • Ballycotton, Co. Cork
  • Ballyglass, Co. Mayo
  • Bonmahon, Co. Waterford
  • Bunbeg, Co. Donegal
  • Carnsore, Co. Wexford
  • Castlefreake, Co. Cork
  • Castletownbere, Co. Cork
  • Cleggan, Co. Galway
  • Clogherhead, Co. Louth
  • Costelloe Bay, Co. Galway
  • Courtown, Co. Wexford
  • Crosshaven, Co. Cork
  • Curracloe, Co. Wexford
  • Dingle, Co. Kerry
  • Doolin, Co. Clare
  • Drogheda, Co. Louth
  • Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
  • Dunmore East, Co. Waterford
  • Fethard, Co. Wexford
  • Glandore, Co. Cork
  • Glenderry, Co. Kerry
  • Goleen, Co. Cork
  • Greencastle, Co. Donegal
  • Greenore, Co. Louth
  • Greystones, Co. Wicklow
  • Guileen, Co. Cork
  • Howth, Co. Dublin
  • Kilkee, Co. Clare
  • Killala, Co. Mayo
  • Killybegs, Co. Donegal
  • Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
  • Knightstown, Co. Kerry
  • Mulroy, Co. Donegal
  • North Aran, Co. Galway
  • Old Head Of Kinsale, Co. Cork
  • Oysterhaven, Co. Cork
  • Rosslare, Co. Wexford
  • Seven Heads, Co. Cork
  • Skerries, Co. Dublin Summercove, Co. Cork
  • Toe Head, Co. Cork
  • Tory Island, Co. Donegal
  • Tramore, Co. Waterford
  • Waterville, Co. Kerry
  • Westport, Co. Mayo
  • Wicklow
  • Youghal, Co. Cork

Sources: Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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