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Displaying items by tag: Kinsale Yacht Club

The number of entries for June's O'Leary Insurance Group Sovereign's Cup exceeded the target of 50 boats over the weekend.

As Afloat reported last month, there was an immediate uptake for the even when entries. The current entry list is available here.

Kinsale's Regatta Director Anthony O'Neill and his organising committee have closed the online entry system until further notice. The Government's Covid-19 Pandemic restrictions and guidelines will now be closely monitored to determine if more boats may be accommodated in the event.

Kinsale Yacht Club says a regatta waiting list has now been set-up and any boat interested should email Anthony O'Neill at [email protected] stating Boat Name, Sail No., Rating, Owners Name and Club.

Kinsale Yacht Club is now operating a waiting list for its June Sovereign's Cup Regatta Photo: Bob BatemanKinsale Yacht Club is now operating a waiting list for its June Sovereign's Cup Regatta Photo: Bob Bateman

KYC say the calibre of boats taking part in June has not been affected by the lower number of entrants necessitated by Covid-19.

Coastal Division

In the Coastal Division, Conor Doyle's Xp50 Freya, the biggest boat in the fleet, along with Tom Roche's Salona 45 Meridian, both from KYC are potential winners.

Ahead of the regatta, Doyle's crew will have honed their boat-handling skills in the Dun Laoghaire to Race earlier in June.

Conor Doyle's Freya from the host clubConor Doyle's Xp50 Freya from the host club Photo: Afloat

Other Sovereign's Cup regatta boats that will also have benefitted from the D2D race will be George Sisk's Xp44 WOW, Denis and Annamarie Murphy's Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo, and the Burke/Lemass/Rigley team's Beneteau First 40 Prima Forte. These bigger boats will be joined by two other smaller boats, also competing in the D2D which are Johnny Treanor's Grand Soleil JustTina and David Riome/Mark Leonard's Valfreya from the host club.

Dublin J109s 

In IRC Zero, Conor Phelan's Ker 37 Jump Juice and Niall Dowling's Ker 40+ Arabella are sure to feature strongly. In IRC 1 the J109's are set to repeat their 2019 'Battle of Kinsale' with Richard Colwell/John Murphy's Outrajeous, Simon Knowles' Indian and the Shanahan Family's Ruth.

Simon Knowles' J109 Indian from Howth Yacht Club will compete in IRC One of the Sovereign's Cup Photo: AfloatSimon Knowles' J109 Indian from Howth Yacht Club will compete in IRC One of the Sovereign's Cup Photo: Afloat

These along with Paul and Deirdre Tingle's X-34 Alpaca will be expected to do well as like the bigger boats in the Coastal Division they are also competing in the D2D race.

Eight Half Tonners will race in the IRC2 division of the 2021 Sovereign's Cup Eight Half Tonners will race in IRC 2 division of the Sovereign's Cup 2021 Photo: Bob Bateman

Eight Half Tonners Sign Up

In IRC 2 no less than eight Half Tonners will be participating. George Radley's Cortegada will be making the trip over to Kinsale from Cobh in Cork Harbour to take on the seven entries from Dublin Bay. Among those will be the 2019 IRC 2 winner Nigel Biggs in Checkmate XVIII and 2019 Irish Half Ton Cup winners Michael Wright and Rick DeNeve in Mata.

Nigel Biggs in Checkmate XVIIINigel Biggs in Checkmate XVIII

White Sails

The White Sail Divisions will be book-ended by KYC's James Matthews' new acquisition Fiscala, a Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 49, and the biggest boat in White Sail.

In White Sail IRC2, will be the smallest boat Shillelagh, a Blazer 23 owned by Kinsale Yacht Club Ex-Commodore and former Sovereign's Cup winner John Twomey.

All in all, there should be intriguing racing in the battles not just for the individual class titles but for The Sovereign's Cup, the Portcullis Trophy and the Michelle Dunn Prix d'Elegance Trophy which are the perpetual trophies awarded for the best overall performing boat in IRC, the best overall performance in Echo and the best-presented boat at the event.

Published in Sovereign's Cup

Registration is now open for the 2021 O'Leary Insurance Group Sovereigns Cup which will take place 23rd to 26th June in Kinsale Yacht Club, click here to enter online.

Participants will sail in Classes 0, 1, 2, Coastal and White Sail under PRO Jack Roy and RO Peter Crowley.

Due to the uncertainty around Covid-19 the event will be limited to 50 boats as outlined by Anthony O'Neill, Regatta Director. "Our reason for making this revision to our plans for the event is driven by the potential uncertainty of the Covid-19 pandemic and the restrictions that may be required at different times during 2021. We are taking the prudent approach that will allow maximum flexibility to proceed with the event given the capacity of our clubhouse and marina."

With a limit of 50 boats, early entry is essential.

If KYC have no option but to cancel the event all competitors will be refunded their entry fees in full.

Published in Sovereign's Cup
22nd December 2020

Kinsale & Christmas Go Together

There are only a few harbours in Ireland where you get the feeling that the land is effortlessly embracing the sea rather than endlessly battling it, but Kinsale is undoubtedly one of them.

The picturesque port town provides a gentle interaction which is emphasised at Christmas, when the long nights bring the opportunity for the festive lights afloat and ashore to blend with one another in a maritime display of faith, hope and love.

Boats at Kinsale marina are lit up for Christmas 2020 Boats at Kinsale marina are lit up for Christmas 2020. Photo by KYC Commodore Mike Walsh

Published in Irish Marinas
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The details of a revised plan for the O'Leary Insurance Group Sovereign's Cup 2021 have been published by Kinsale Yacht Club together with a Notice of Race (NOR).

The Notice of Race is downloadable below as a PDF document (2mb)

Sovereign's Cup Regatta Director Anthony O'Neill has outlined how plans for the event, which is to take place from 23rd to 26th June 2021, have been revised and the reasons for doing so.

"We are all only too aware of the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic and the restrictions necessary to curtail the spread of infection. We also know that this has led to the cancellation of many planned events this year. Given the potential uncertainty of the Covid-19 pandemic and the restrictions that may be required at the time of this event, the target number of entries will be 50 boats".

This total number of boats may, at the discretion of the Organising Authority (KYC), be increased in order to have a reasonable number of boats in each division and at the same time remain compliant with Covid-19 guidelines in effect at the time of the event. It is intended that boats will be participating in IRC Classes 0, 1, 2, Coastal and White-sail.

Our reason for making this revision to our plans for the event is driven by the potential uncertainty of the Covid-19 pandemic and the restrictions that may be required at different times during 2021. We are taking the prudent approach that will allow maximum flexibility to proceed with the event given the capacity of our clubhouse and marina.

In addition, our clubhouse may be restricted to booked table service only for food and beverages. Given that our marina is in the town we are confident that the local hotels, restaurants and bars will cater for the participants not accommodated in our clubhouse.

If the prevailing Covid-19 restrictions next June are such that we have no option but to cancel the event all competitors will be refunded their entry fees in full.

Registration opens on January 5th here

Listen to Sovereign's Cup Regatta Director Anthony O'Neill's July podcast with Tom MacSweeney here

Published in Sovereign's Cup

Tralee Bay Sailing Club's Paddy Cunnane leads an 11-strong Standard division at a 60-boat Munster Laser Championships in Kinsale Yacht Club

The Kerry solo sailor leads Royal Cork Yacht Club Master Nick Walsh by dint of his victory in the last race of four sailed yesterday. 

Walsh's clubmate Edward Rice, another Master sailor, lies third.

Significantly, the KYC event, under Race Officer John Stallard, sailed enough races on the first day to constitute a championship in case today's big wind forecast cancels the championships.

The Laser sailors gather for the KYC briefing ahead of the Munster Championships Photo: Bob BatemanThe Laser sailors gather for the KYC briefing ahead of the Munster Championships Photo: Bob Bateman

4.7s

In the 4.7 division, youth James Dwyer tops the leaderboard on three points, the former Optimist ace is the first of nine Royal Cork Yacht Club boats that dominate the 26-boat fleet. Second is Harry Twomey on 6 points with Justin Lucas third on ten points.

Radials

The host club's Micheal O'Suilleabhain on three points leads the Radials by four points from RCYC's Michael Crosbie. Jonathan O'Shaughnessy lies third on nine points. 

As Afloat reported earlier, the dinghy class proceeded with its County Cork Championship on a restricted basis and asked Dublin and Donegal sailors, currently under Level 3 Covid partial lockdown, not to attend.

Results are here

Bob Bateman's Laser Munsters Photo Slideshow

Published in Laser
Tagged under

Finbarr O'Regan's Elan 333 leads IRC One in the Kinsale Yacht Club 'Mary P' September Saturday Series for cruisers after yesterday's first light airs race. O'Regan leads Thomas Roche's Salona 45 Meridien in second. Third from four starters is Conor Doyle's Xp 50, Freya. 

In IRC Two, the Sigma 33 Valfreya (Riome & Leonard) leads Padraig O'Donovan's Fastnet 34 Chameleon. 

The ECHO White Sail division is led by John Twomey's Blazer 23, Shillelagh.

Dave Sullivan sailing the XC42 Cimarron is second in the White Sail Fleet in the Mary P September league Photo: Bob BatemanDave Sullivan sailing the XC42 Cimarron is second in the White Sail Fleet in the Mary P September league Photo: Bob Bateman

The results are here

Bob Bateman's Kinsale Yacht Club September Series Day One Slideshow below

Published in Kinsale
Tagged under

Kinsale Yacht Club has announced that the Cantor Fitzgerald Dragon Week, which was scheduled to take place in lieu of the earlier Gold Cup event has now also been cancelled.

Speaking of the announcement, Matthias Hellstern, Rear Commodore of Kinsale Yacht Club stated "It's a real shame that we have to cancel another Dragon event in Kinsale, however, we looked closely at the new Government restrictions and felt that we really couldn't work within the guidelines and still provide an exceptional event, which Kinsale is noted for. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Cantor Fitzgerald for their support and of our decision. We very much look forward to working with them again in the near future".

Daniel Murphy of Cantor Fitzgerald added "As a Dragon sailor, I am really disappointed that Dragon Week is cancelled. I know Kinsale Yacht Club had put so much plans in place for the week and its volunteers had once again come to the fore, to ensure its success. However, given where we are with regard to this Covid-19 pandemic, we fully support Kinsale Yacht Club's decision".

Published in Dragon
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A nine boat fleet started tonight off the Charles Fort line in the SCORA and Kinsale Yacht Club 100-mile Fastnet Race.

As previously reported, the fleet was a mix of south coast cruisers, including three from Royal Cork, mixed with some high powered entries that had their sights on next month's now-cancelled Round Ireland Race.

Annamarie and Denis Murphy's Grand Soliel 40, Nieulargo was first out of the harbour in a 10-12 knot south-westerly breeze.

Download the full entry list below for the UK Sailmakers Ireland sponsored race.

Among the front runners for the 100-mile race is Nieulargo that was also racing last night in Royal Cork's July league in Cork Harbour. Also starting as a contender was Cian McCarthy's new Sunfast 3300, Cinnamon Girl that attracted a lot of interest from spectators.

Making the trip from Dublin Bay was John Treanor's Grand Soleil 34 Justina from the National Yacht Club.

KYC will award the Fastnet Trophy to the yacht with the lowest corrected time in IRC. The Ocean Trophy shall be awarded to the yacht with the second-lowest corrected time in IRC. The Minihane Trophy shall be awarded to the yacht with the lowest corrected time in Echo.

The race time limit is 1500 hours on Saturday.

Published in Kinsale
Tagged under

Following the recent announcement of the Cantor Fitzgerald Dragon Week, enquires and interest has steadily been making their way back to the Kinsale fleet in West Cork.

Kinsale Yacht Club is hopeful that the “green list” will allow UK travel by September as several UK teams have indicated their intention to travel.

Kinsale Yacht Club dragon sailors should have seven boats competing with long time Dragon campaigner Cameron Good along with his crew on “Little Fella” will be hoping to lift the National title, the one championship that has eluded this team over their illustrious career

Other Kinsale hopefuls will be the Goggin/ Murphy team on “Serafina” along with “TBD” made up of experienced campaigners James Matthews, Dave Good and Fergal O’Hanlon.

Glandore Harbour has indicated that five teams are hopeful of making the short journey down the coast and no doubt multiple national championship winners “Phanton” from Dublin will be in Kinsale to defend their crown. The class rumour mill has also been in overdrive recently with suggestions that Royal St. George's Michael Cotter together with Belfast Lough's Simon Brien and Davy Gomes are to sail the Dragon, “Whisper” for the week!

The “Cantor Fitzgerald Dragon Week” will run in the following format:

  • South Coat Championships - Saturday 5th – Monday 7th September
  • Lay Day – Tuesday 8th September
  • National Championships – Wednesday 9th – Saturday 12th September
Published in Dragon
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Yachts that were aiming to compete in the now-cancelled Round Ireland Race are among an expected 12-boat line-up that will contest tonight's Kinsale Yacht Club Fastnet Race sponsored by UK Sailmakers Ireland.

Among the front runners for the 100-mile race are Annamarie and Denis Murphy's Grand Soliel 40, Nieulargo that was also racing last night in Royal Cork's July league in Cork Harbour. Also starting as a contender is Cian McCarthy's new Sunfast 3300, Cinnamon Girl.

Making the trip from Dublin Bay is John Treanor's Grand Soleil 34 Justina from the National Yacht Club.

John Treanor's Justina has made the trip from Dublin Bay for the KYC Fastnet RaceJohn Treanor's Justina has made the trip from Dublin Bay for the KYC Fastnet Race Photo: Afloat

Kinsale entries are expected to include Finbarr O'Regan's Artful Dodger and Tom Roche's Meridian.

The race will have an all-in start with the first gun at 6.25 pm off the Charles Fort line.

KYC will award the Fastnet Trophy to the yacht with the lowest corrected time in IRC. The Ocean Trophy shall be awarded to the yacht with the second-lowest corrected time in IRC. The Minihane Trophy shall be awarded to the yacht with the lowest corrected time in Echo. If

The forecast is for light to medium south-west winds.

Published in Kinsale
Page 1 of 17

The Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard is Ireland's fourth 'Blue Light' service (along with An Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service). It provides a nationwide maritime emergency organisation as well as a variety of services to shipping and other government agencies.

The purpose of the Irish Coast Guard is to promote safety and security standards, and by doing so, prevent as far as possible, the loss of life at sea, and on inland waters, mountains and caves, and to provide effective emergency response services and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The Irish Coast Guard has responsibility for Ireland's system of marine communications, surveillance and emergency management in Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and certain inland waterways.

It is responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue and counter-pollution and ship casualty operations. It also has responsibility for vessel traffic monitoring.

Operations in respect of maritime security, illegal drug trafficking, illegal migration and fisheries enforcement are co-ordinated by other bodies within the Irish Government.

On average, each year, the Irish Coast Guard is expected to:

  • handle 3,000 marine emergencies
  • assist 4,500 people and save about 200 lives
  • task Coast Guard helicopters on missions

The Coast Guard has been around in some form in Ireland since 1908.

Coast Guard helicopters

The Irish Coast Guard has contracted five medium-lift Sikorsky Search and Rescue helicopters deployed at bases in Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo.

The helicopters are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours and 45 minutes at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice based at Waterford.

These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties).

They can also be used for assistance in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations as authorised by the Coast Guard within appropriate regulations.

Irish Coastguard FAQs

The Irish Coast Guard provides nationwide maritime emergency response, while also promoting safety and security standards. It aims to prevent the loss of life at sea, on inland waters, on mountains and in caves; and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The main role of the Irish Coast Guard is to rescue people from danger at sea or on land, to organise immediate medical transport and to assist boats and ships within the country's jurisdiction. It has three marine rescue centres in Dublin, Malin Head, Co Donegal, and Valentia Island, Co Kerry. The Dublin National Maritime Operations centre provides marine search and rescue responses and coordinates the response to marine casualty incidents with the Irish exclusive economic zone (EEZ).

Yes, effectively, it is the fourth "blue light" service. The Marine Rescue Sub-Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for the coastal area between Ballycotton, Co Cork and Clifden, Co Galway. At the same time, the MRSC Malin Head covers the area between Clifden and Lough Foyle. Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC) Dublin covers Carlingford Lough, Co Louth to Ballycotton, Co Cork. Each MRCC/MRSC also broadcasts maritime safety information on VHF and MF radio, including navigational and gale warnings, shipping forecasts, local inshore forecasts, strong wind warnings and small craft warnings.

The Irish Coast Guard handles about 3,000 marine emergencies annually, and assists 4,500 people - saving an estimated 200 lives, according to the Department of Transport. In 2016, Irish Coast Guard helicopters completed 1,000 missions in a single year for the first time.

Yes, Irish Coast Guard helicopters evacuate medical patients from offshore islands to hospital on average about 100 times a year. In September 2017, the Department of Health announced that search and rescue pilots who work 24-hour duties would not be expected to perform any inter-hospital patient transfers. The Air Corps flies the Emergency Aeromedical Service, established in 2012 and using an AW139 twin-engine helicopter. Known by its call sign "Air Corps 112", it airlifted its 3,000th patient in autumn 2020.

The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the British Maritime and Coastguard Agency, which is responsible for the Northern Irish coast.

The Irish Coast Guard is a State-funded service, with both paid management personnel and volunteers, and is under the auspices of the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport. It is allocated approximately 74 million euro annually in funding, some 85 per cent of which pays for a helicopter contract that costs 60 million euro annually. The overall funding figure is "variable", an Oireachtas committee was told in 2019. Other significant expenditure items include volunteer training exercises, equipment, maintenance, renewal, and information technology.

The Irish Coast Guard has four search and rescue helicopter bases at Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo, run on a contract worth 50 million euro annually with an additional 10 million euro in costs by CHC Ireland. It provides five medium-lift Sikorsky S-92 helicopters and trained crew. The 44 Irish Coast Guard coastal units with 1,000 volunteers are classed as onshore search units, with 23 of the 44 units having rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) and 17 units having cliff rescue capability. The Irish Coast Guard has 60 buildings in total around the coast, and units have search vehicles fitted with blue lights, all-terrain vehicles or quads, first aid equipment, generators and area lighting, search equipment, marine radios, pyrotechnics and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Community Rescue Boats Ireland also provide lifeboats and crews to assist in search and rescue. The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the Garda Siochána, National Ambulance Service, Naval Service and Air Corps, Civil Defence, while fishing vessels, ships and other craft at sea offer assistance in search operations.

The helicopters are designated as airborne from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours, and 45 minutes at night. The aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, on inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains and cover the 32 counties. They can also assist in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and can transport offshore firefighters and ambulance teams. The Irish Coast Guard volunteers units are expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time of departing from the station house in ten minutes from notification during daylight and 20 minutes at night. They are also expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time to the scene of the incident in less than 60 minutes from notification by day and 75 minutes at night, subject to geographical limitations.

Units are managed by an officer-in-charge (three stripes on the uniform) and a deputy officer in charge (two stripes). Each team is trained in search skills, first aid, setting up helicopter landing sites and a range of maritime skills, while certain units are also trained in cliff rescue.

Volunteers receive an allowance for time spent on exercises and call-outs. What is the difference between the Irish Coast Guard and the RNLI? The RNLI is a registered charity which has been saving lives at sea since 1824, and runs a 24/7 volunteer lifeboat service around the British and Irish coasts. It is a declared asset of the British Maritime and Coast Guard Agency and the Irish Coast Guard. Community Rescue Boats Ireland is a community rescue network of volunteers under the auspices of Water Safety Ireland.

No, it does not charge for rescue and nor do the RNLI or Community Rescue Boats Ireland.

The marine rescue centres maintain 19 VHF voice and DSC radio sites around the Irish coastline and a digital paging system. There are two VHF repeater test sites, four MF radio sites and two NAVTEX transmitter sites. Does Ireland have a national search and rescue plan? The first national search and rescue plan was published in July, 2019. It establishes the national framework for the overall development, deployment and improvement of search and rescue services within the Irish Search and Rescue Region and to meet domestic and international commitments. The purpose of the national search and rescue plan is to promote a planned and nationally coordinated search and rescue response to persons in distress at sea, in the air or on land.

Yes, the Irish Coast Guard is responsible for responding to spills of oil and other hazardous substances with the Irish pollution responsibility zone, along with providing an effective response to marine casualties and monitoring or intervening in marine salvage operations. It provides and maintains a 24-hour marine pollution notification at the three marine rescue centres. It coordinates exercises and tests of national and local pollution response plans.

The first Irish Coast Guard volunteer to die on duty was Caitriona Lucas, a highly trained member of the Doolin Coast Guard unit, while assisting in a search for a missing man by the Kilkee unit in September 2016. Six months later, four Irish Coast Guard helicopter crew – Dara Fitzpatrick, Mark Duffy, Paul Ormsby and Ciarán Smith -died when their Sikorsky S-92 struck Blackrock island off the Mayo coast on March 14, 2017. The Dublin-based Rescue 116 crew were providing "top cover" or communications for a medical emergency off the west coast and had been approaching Blacksod to refuel. Up until the five fatalities, the Irish Coast Guard recorded that more than a million "man hours" had been spent on more than 30,000 rescue missions since 1991.

Several investigations were initiated into each incident. The Marine Casualty Investigation Board was critical of the Irish Coast Guard in its final report into the death of Caitriona Lucas, while a separate Health and Safety Authority investigation has been completed, but not published. The Air Accident Investigation Unit final report into the Rescue 116 helicopter crash has not yet been published.

The Irish Coast Guard in its present form dates back to 1991, when the Irish Marine Emergency Service was formed after a campaign initiated by Dr Joan McGinley to improve air/sea rescue services on the west Irish coast. Before Irish independence, the British Admiralty was responsible for a Coast Guard (formerly the Water Guard or Preventative Boat Service) dating back to 1809. The West Coast Search and Rescue Action Committee was initiated with a public meeting in Killybegs, Co Donegal, in 1988 and the group was so effective that a Government report was commissioned, which recommended setting up a new division of the Department of the Marine to run the Marine Rescue Co-Ordination Centre (MRCC), then based at Shannon, along with the existing coast radio service, and coast and cliff rescue. A medium-range helicopter base was established at Shannon within two years. Initially, the base was served by the Air Corps.

The first director of what was then IMES was Capt Liam Kirwan, who had spent 20 years at sea and latterly worked with the Marine Survey Office. Capt Kirwan transformed a poorly funded voluntary coast and cliff rescue service into a trained network of cliff and sea rescue units – largely voluntary, but with paid management. The MRCC was relocated from Shannon to an IMES headquarters at the then Department of the Marine (now Department of Transport) in Leeson Lane, Dublin. The coast radio stations at Valentia, Co Kerry, and Malin Head, Co Donegal, became marine rescue-sub-centres.

The current director is Chris Reynolds, who has been in place since August 2007 and was formerly with the Naval Service. He has been seconded to the head of mission with the EUCAP Somalia - which has a mandate to enhance Somalia's maritime civilian law enforcement capacity – since January 2019.

  • Achill, Co. Mayo
  • Ardmore, Co. Waterford
  • Arklow, Co. Wicklow
  • Ballybunion, Co. Kerry
  • Ballycotton, Co. Cork
  • Ballyglass, Co. Mayo
  • Bonmahon, Co. Waterford
  • Bunbeg, Co. Donegal
  • Carnsore, Co. Wexford
  • Castlefreake, Co. Cork
  • Castletownbere, Co. Cork
  • Cleggan, Co. Galway
  • Clogherhead, Co. Louth
  • Costelloe Bay, Co. Galway
  • Courtown, Co. Wexford
  • Crosshaven, Co. Cork
  • Curracloe, Co. Wexford
  • Dingle, Co. Kerry
  • Doolin, Co. Clare
  • Drogheda, Co. Louth
  • Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
  • Dunmore East, Co. Waterford
  • Fethard, Co. Wexford
  • Glandore, Co. Cork
  • Glenderry, Co. Kerry
  • Goleen, Co. Cork
  • Greencastle, Co. Donegal
  • Greenore, Co. Louth
  • Greystones, Co. Wicklow
  • Guileen, Co. Cork
  • Howth, Co. Dublin
  • Kilkee, Co. Clare
  • Killala, Co. Mayo
  • Killybegs, Co. Donegal
  • Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
  • Knightstown, Co. Kerry
  • Mulroy, Co. Donegal
  • North Aran, Co. Galway
  • Old Head Of Kinsale, Co. Cork
  • Oysterhaven, Co. Cork
  • Rosslare, Co. Wexford
  • Seven Heads, Co. Cork
  • Skerries, Co. Dublin Summercove, Co. Cork
  • Toe Head, Co. Cork
  • Tory Island, Co. Donegal
  • Tramore, Co. Waterford
  • Waterville, Co. Kerry
  • Westport, Co. Mayo
  • Wicklow
  • Youghal, Co. Cork

Sources: Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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