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Displaying items by tag: Kinsale Yacht Club

It was a one, two overall for the J109 design in this weekend's Kinsale Yacht Club SCORA Fastnet Race. 

Royal Cork yacht Jelly Baby claimed a victory in a corrected time of 21 hours:13 minutes: 26 seconds from the host club's Artful Dodger (Finbarr O'Regan) on 21:24:34 corrected in a race that was shortened due to light winds.

The defending champion Nieulargo, a Grand Soleil 40, finished third on a corrected time of 21:36:02

Artful DodJer (IRL1713) from Kinsale Yacht Club skippered by Finbarr O'ReganArtful DodJer (IRL1713) from Kinsale Yacht Club skippered by Finbarr O'Regan Photo: Bob Bateman

As Afloat reported yesterday, after a well-timed postponement the nine-boat Kinsale Yacht Club SCORA Fastnet Race got away in a great breeze at 10 am on Saturday morning for its annual offshore race.

Royal Cork's Nieulargo (IRL2129) skippered by Denis Murphy Photo: Bob BatemanRoyal Cork's Nieulargo (IRL2129) skippered by Denis Murphy Photo: Bob Bateman

The fleet, sponsored by UK Sailmakers Ireland, rounded the much closer Kowloon Bridge south cardinal buoy instead of the Fastnet rock.

Full results are here

Bob Bateman's Kinsale/SCORA Fastnet Race Photo Gallery

Published in Kinsale

Kinsale Yacht Club is hosting the Squib South Coast Championships this weekend.

Racing on Saturday and Sunday will be between the Old Head and the Sovereign Islands of Kinsale Harbour.

As Afloat reported previously, the Squib Northern Championships on Belfast Lough was won last month by locals Greg Bell and Jayne Kearney in Prodigal who stamped their authority on the 17 strong fleet.

Meanwhile, the Squibs Summer Series at Kinsale YC has ten boats racing and is being led by Michael O'Sullivan's Mucky Duck on 16 points, followed by Bobby Nash and Dave Ross in Flora on 22 and Kevin Downing's Grey Matter on 30.

Published in Squib

Due to the light winds forecast for Friday night, Kinsale Yacht Club has postponed the SCORA Kinsale Fastnet race until Saturday morning. 

Sailing secretary David Cullinane told Afloat "We have decided to postpone until Saturday 17th July. First Gun will be 10:55"

As Afloat reported previously, Kinsale has increased interest in the UK Sailmakers sponsored event this year with boats from Dublin, Waterford as well as the Cork clubs taking part.

Kinsale Yacht Club has increased interest in this weekend's Fastnet race in association with SCORA Photo: Bob BatemanKinsale Yacht Club has increased interest in this weekend's Fastnet race in association with SCORA Photo: Bob Bateman

The arrival of two Half Tonners into the fleet, namely George Radley's Cortegada and Ronan Downing’s Miss Whiplash, will add extra spice to Saturday's race against some of the larger cruiser racers, especially if the forecasted light winds prevail.

The latest KYC amendment is detailed here

South coast J109 sisterships Artful Dodjer (above) and Jelly Baby (below) are both racing round the Fastnet Rock this SaturdaySouth coast J109 sisterships Artful Dodjer (above) and Jelly Baby (below) are both racing round the Fastnet Rock this Saturday

South coast J109 sisterships Artful Dodjer (above) and Jelly Baby (below) are both racing round the Fastnet Rock this Saturday   

Published in SCORA
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An estimated fleet of ten boats is contemplating a light air forecast for Friday evening's SCORA Kinsale Yacht Club Fastnet Race.

Sponsored by UK Sailmakers Ireland, the fleet includes the on form host club J109 entry of Artful Dodjer (Finnbarr O'Regan). 

Update: The race has been postponed to Saturday. Read more here

Forecasts are for south easterlies at only 3-5 knots at 7.25 pm start time, a big change on last year's race that started in much stronger winds as Afloat reported here.  

Last year's winner the Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo (Denis and Annamarie Murphy2020 winner - the Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo (Denis and Annamarie Murphy Photo: Bob Bateman

Also lining up for what looks like it will be a slow race, are Cian McCarthy's Sunfast 300 Cinnamon Girl, the J/109 Jelly Baby (Brian Jones) from Royal Cork.

Last year's winner the Grand Soleil 40 Nieulargo (Denis and Annamarie Murphy) is also entered along with the Grand Soleil 34 Justina (John Treanor ) from the National Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire Harbour as well as other cruiser racers, Reavra Too, White Tiger, Valfreya and Flyover from Dunmore East in County Waterford.

Download the NOR for the Kinsale Fastnet Race (with amendment) below

Published in Kinsale
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Sovereign's Cup competitors can expect a mix of light to medium conditions over the next four days at Kinsale Yacht Club tempting pundits to predict that it might be the all-round performance of cruiser-racers types such as the J109 (that make up 15% of the fleet) that might come out on top by Saturday.

Light winds for this morning's opening day of the O'Leary Life & Pensions Sovereign's Cup at Kinsale Yacht Club looks like a tricky scenario but fresher conditions with sun and breeze from Thursday offer the prospect of some 'champagne sailing' for the fleet of 62 boats now gathered in the West Cork port. 

As Afloat reported previously, the event is split across five divisions with the biggest boats competing in the Coastal series which also features the biggest turnout.

In the Sovereign's Cup offshore line-up is Denis and Annamarie Murphy's Champion Grand Soleil Nieulargo from the Royal Cork Yacht ClubIn the Sovereign's Cup offshore line-up is Denis and Annamarie Murphy's Champion Grand Soleil Nieulargo from the Royal Cork Yacht Club

Included in the offshore line-up is Denis and Annamarie Murphy's Nieulargo from the Royal Cork Yacht Club in Crosshaven and Kinsale's own Conor Doyle on Freya. George Sisk's WOW! from the Royal Irish Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire is also back as one of the original entries for this course.

George Sisk's WOW! from the Royal Irish Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire is competing in this week's Sovereign's Cup at Kinsale Yacht ClubGeorge Sisk's WOW! from the Royal Irish Yacht Club in Dun Laoghaire is competing in this week's Sovereign's Cup at Kinsale Yacht Club 

The four-day series is being staged at nearly half its normal size due to the Covid-19 pandemic and no indoor activities have been organised with restrictions on numbers ashore in place. Overseas entries are unable to attend due to travel restrictions.

"While we are unable to have festival conditions ashore this year, there's still a mood of celebration as we're all set for great racing afloat," commented Anthony O'Neill, Regatta Director at Kinsale Yacht Club. "The competitors have closely followed the Covid guidelines and our precautions have been widely welcomed; people just want to get out sailing at last."

The four-day O'Leary Insurance Group Sovereign's Cup is the first of the regular Irish regattas on the national fixtures list to resume.

Published in Sovereign's Cup

Kinsale Yacht Club rivals its South coast Royal Cork neighbour with four offshore entries into Wednesday's 280-mile Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race

It's a strong turnout for the West Cork club that also has the biggest entry into the race in the form of Conor Doyle's fifty-foot X-yacht Freya. 

Kinsale also has a potent double-handed entry from Cian McCarthy sailing his Sunfast 3300, Cinnamon Girl (stratospherically rated at 1.026)

Cian McCarthy is sailing his Sunfast 3300, Cinnamon Girl double-handed in the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race Photo: Bob BatemanKinsale's Cian McCarthy is sailing his Sunfast 3300, Cinnamon Girl double-handed in the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race Photo: Bob Bateman

Finbarr O'Regan's new J109 Artful Dodger will make its debut in the race and with one favourite J109 now out of the race and O'Regan's successful track record in his former Elan 333, this new Kinsale combination may be something of a dark horse in a race that will be raced along largely familiar south coast waters for the KYC crew.

The Dublin J109 Wakey Wakey has been sold to the south coast is now known as Artful Dodger and makes its racing debut under the Kinsale Yacht club burgee this week in the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle RacePhoto: AfloatThe Dublin J109 Wakey Wakey has been sold to the south coast, is now known as Artful Dodger and makes her racing debut under the Kinsale Yacht Club burgee this week in the Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race Photo: Afloat

As Afloat's WM Nixon visualises here there could be a scenario where the Xp50 and the Xp44 WOW (George Sisk, RIYC) – along with other biggies like Robert Rendell's new Grand Soleil 44 Samatom – will get themselves clear ahead in a separate group and keep piling on the lead in increasingly different conditions from the rest of the fleet.

Kinsale Yacht Club Entries in the 2021 Dun Laoghaire to Dingle Race

  • Artful Dodger J109, IRL1713, Skipper: Finbarr O'Regan, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 1.006
  • Cinnamon Girl SUNFAST 3300, IRL 1627, Skipper: Cian McCarthy, Class: Double handed Racing, Rating: 1.026
  • Freya Xp50 IRL 5077, Skipper: Conor Doyle, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 1.084
  • Meridian Salona 45, IRL 4076, Skipper: Thomas Roche, Class: IRC Racing, Rating: 1.094

Tom Roche's Meridian Salona 45 Photo: Bob BatemanTom Roche's Meridian Salona 45 from Kinsale Photo: Bob Bateman

As Afloat reported, the race is shaping up to be a highlight of the sailing season and has attracted a formidable line-up of Irish offshore sailing talent.

38 boats are lined up for Wednesday's start at 2 pm, a date that WM Nixon is calling a Clarion Call for Ireland's 2021 Sailing Season.

Published in Dun Laoghaire Dingle

The Notice of Race has been published for the Squib South Coast Championships taking place on 17 & 18 July at Kinsale Yacht Club.

With a return to racing expected for 7th June, Kinsale hopes to attract entries from Glandore to Killyleagh and all the Irish Squib fleets in between. 

Racing will take place in the waters outside Kinsale Harbour between the Old Head and the Sovereign Islands.

Competition, say organisers, is expected to be 'extremely high' as the Irish National Championships are scheduled just three weeks later in Killyleagh Yacht Club in Northern Ireland.

Entries will be accepted up until 12th July 2021.

Download the NOR and entry form below.

Published in Squib
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Kinsale Yacht Club has confirmed its O'Leary Insurance Group Sovereign's Cup from 23rd to 26th June 2021.

"Having considered the recent announcement on the easing of government restrictions and after consulting all stakeholders, we have agreed that we can hold our reduced size Sovereign's Cup", said Regatta director Anthony O'Neill.

"We believe that there is a pent-up demand among all sailors to get back racing and that this year's event, albeit a more 'on the water' regatta, will cater very well for that demand".

Anthony O'Neill, Sovereigns Cup Regatta Director Anthony O'Neill, Sovereigns Cup Regatta Director

"We are very happy to be in the position that our early decision to plan for a smaller event with a target of 50 boats has now been proven to have been a prudent one. While the government announcement last Friday has effectively given the 'green-light' to sailing in controlled situations, there still remains many uncertainties and challenges for event organisers. Not least among those are restrictions and measures that may be required ashore", O'Neill said. 

"All of us at Kinsale Yacht Club are working hard to provide the best possible racing in June"

For that reason, a final decision on the level of social activity in Kinsale Yacht Club will not be made until closer to the event.

"We will be guided at that time by the guidelines in place with regards to numbers allowed at Events and Social Gatherings" he added.

"If the expected clarifications/alterations to the guidelines do not allow for the use of our Club facilities, then we are confident that participant's needs can be accommodated at the outdoor facilities of the Restaurants, Cafes and Bars in the town".

In addition, all Hotels and Guesthouses will have indoor dining available for those participants who are residents.

"All of us at Kinsale Yacht Club are working hard to provide the best possible racing in June", ONeill concluded.

Published in Sovereign's Cup

There was good news from Kinsale this week as a yacht club member, Stephen McCarthy and his construction company Astra Construction have become the Gold sponsor to back the yacht clubs' hosting of the Dragon Gold Cup in 2024.

After the disappointment of having to cancel the 2020 event, Kinsale has been rewarded with the hosting of the 2024 edition, an exceptionally prestigious event that has in the past attracted royalty and Olympic winners.

Speaking of the sponsorship Stephen McCarthy, himself a keen sailor and father to offshore supremo Cian McCarthy, wanted to support Kinsale Yacht Club, and the Gold Cup was the perfect match for him.

Stephen commented, "Astra Construction are delighted to be on board for the 2024 Dragon Gold Cup. Although we are the title sponsor, our primary aim is to promote our wonderful Yacht Club and have the event called the Kinsale Yacht Club Gold Cup 2024. I am excited to be involved so early in the cycle and look forward to working with the organisers to ensure a truly memorable and successful event."

Michael Walsh Commodore of Kinsale Yacht Club welcomed the announcement by adding, "Stephen has been incredibly generous, not only by becoming the Gold sponsor of the event but also offering his time and energy to help in any way with the other volunteers in running the event to the exacting detail required of the Gold Cup Deed of Gift. Kinsale Yacht Club's success is based around its volunteers, and Stephen has absolutely defined what the Yacht Club is all about by not only sponsoring the event but also volunteering to help out."

Daniel Murphy of the 2024 organising committee and current Dragon class captain commented that "Work has already begun here in Kinsale for 2024. We are delighted to welcome Stephen and thank him for his support and faith in us to run a world-class event. The Dragon class in Kinsale is certainly enjoying a rejuvenation at present, with a growing fleet of active and competitive boats and more on the horizon. The attraction to the fleet in Kinsale is the fun and camaraderie within the group and being able to sail in a beautiful venue like Kinsale."

It is fair to say that all in Kinsale Yacht Club already have their eye firmly on running a spectacular event in 2024, the yacht clubs' third time welcoming the Gold Cup to Kinsale.

Published in Kinsale

The latest Marine Notice from the Department of Transport reminds seafarers of the important of passage planning and regular weather forecast checks during voyages.

It comes following the recommendations in the Marine Casualty Investigation Board (MCIB) report into the rescue of five sailors from the yacht Loa Zour amid severe storm conditions off the Spanish coast in June 2019.

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, a crew from Kinsale Yacht Club were rescued from the 40ft yacht on 6 June 2019 just days after they had set out from West Cork for the Spanish port of A Coruña, after experiencing extreme conditions amid the surprise Storm Miguel.

The MCIB report found that while the storm was “an unusual and unexpected weather event”, and the skipper of the Loa Our “showed good judgement in his decision and actions in broadcasting a Mayday distress VHF transmission and activating the vessel’s EPIRB”, he was also unaware of the details of the Code of Practice for the Safe Operation of Recreational Craft and the requirement to submit a passage plan to a shore-based authority.

“If the basic tenets of the passage plan had been observed in detail with respect to updated weather forecasting during the voyage, observing the limitations of the boat design capability and staying within reach of a safe haven by taking a more circuitous route around the coastline of the Bay of Biscay, then the crew of yacht Loa Zour may have been better prepared before encountering Storm Miguel 85 [nautical miles] north of A Coruña,” the report states.

Marine Notice No 19 of 2021 highlights the relevant advice contained within the Code of Practice and related Marine Notices, and can be downloaded below.

Published in MCIB
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The Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard is Ireland's fourth 'Blue Light' service (along with An Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service). It provides a nationwide maritime emergency organisation as well as a variety of services to shipping and other government agencies.

The purpose of the Irish Coast Guard is to promote safety and security standards, and by doing so, prevent as far as possible, the loss of life at sea, and on inland waters, mountains and caves, and to provide effective emergency response services and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The Irish Coast Guard has responsibility for Ireland's system of marine communications, surveillance and emergency management in Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and certain inland waterways.

It is responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue and counter-pollution and ship casualty operations. It also has responsibility for vessel traffic monitoring.

Operations in respect of maritime security, illegal drug trafficking, illegal migration and fisheries enforcement are co-ordinated by other bodies within the Irish Government.

On average, each year, the Irish Coast Guard is expected to:

  • handle 3,000 marine emergencies
  • assist 4,500 people and save about 200 lives
  • task Coast Guard helicopters on missions

The Coast Guard has been around in some form in Ireland since 1908.

Coast Guard helicopters

The Irish Coast Guard has contracted five medium-lift Sikorsky Search and Rescue helicopters deployed at bases in Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo.

The helicopters are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours and 45 minutes at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice based at Waterford.

These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties).

They can also be used for assistance in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations as authorised by the Coast Guard within appropriate regulations.

Irish Coastguard FAQs

The Irish Coast Guard provides nationwide maritime emergency response, while also promoting safety and security standards. It aims to prevent the loss of life at sea, on inland waters, on mountains and in caves; and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The main role of the Irish Coast Guard is to rescue people from danger at sea or on land, to organise immediate medical transport and to assist boats and ships within the country's jurisdiction. It has three marine rescue centres in Dublin, Malin Head, Co Donegal, and Valentia Island, Co Kerry. The Dublin National Maritime Operations centre provides marine search and rescue responses and coordinates the response to marine casualty incidents with the Irish exclusive economic zone (EEZ).

Yes, effectively, it is the fourth "blue light" service. The Marine Rescue Sub-Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for the coastal area between Ballycotton, Co Cork and Clifden, Co Galway. At the same time, the MRSC Malin Head covers the area between Clifden and Lough Foyle. Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC) Dublin covers Carlingford Lough, Co Louth to Ballycotton, Co Cork. Each MRCC/MRSC also broadcasts maritime safety information on VHF and MF radio, including navigational and gale warnings, shipping forecasts, local inshore forecasts, strong wind warnings and small craft warnings.

The Irish Coast Guard handles about 3,000 marine emergencies annually, and assists 4,500 people - saving an estimated 200 lives, according to the Department of Transport. In 2016, Irish Coast Guard helicopters completed 1,000 missions in a single year for the first time.

Yes, Irish Coast Guard helicopters evacuate medical patients from offshore islands to hospital on average about 100 times a year. In September 2017, the Department of Health announced that search and rescue pilots who work 24-hour duties would not be expected to perform any inter-hospital patient transfers. The Air Corps flies the Emergency Aeromedical Service, established in 2012 and using an AW139 twin-engine helicopter. Known by its call sign "Air Corps 112", it airlifted its 3,000th patient in autumn 2020.

The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the British Maritime and Coastguard Agency, which is responsible for the Northern Irish coast.

The Irish Coast Guard is a State-funded service, with both paid management personnel and volunteers, and is under the auspices of the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport. It is allocated approximately 74 million euro annually in funding, some 85 per cent of which pays for a helicopter contract that costs 60 million euro annually. The overall funding figure is "variable", an Oireachtas committee was told in 2019. Other significant expenditure items include volunteer training exercises, equipment, maintenance, renewal, and information technology.

The Irish Coast Guard has four search and rescue helicopter bases at Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo, run on a contract worth 50 million euro annually with an additional 10 million euro in costs by CHC Ireland. It provides five medium-lift Sikorsky S-92 helicopters and trained crew. The 44 Irish Coast Guard coastal units with 1,000 volunteers are classed as onshore search units, with 23 of the 44 units having rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) and 17 units having cliff rescue capability. The Irish Coast Guard has 60 buildings in total around the coast, and units have search vehicles fitted with blue lights, all-terrain vehicles or quads, first aid equipment, generators and area lighting, search equipment, marine radios, pyrotechnics and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Community Rescue Boats Ireland also provide lifeboats and crews to assist in search and rescue. The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the Garda Siochána, National Ambulance Service, Naval Service and Air Corps, Civil Defence, while fishing vessels, ships and other craft at sea offer assistance in search operations.

The helicopters are designated as airborne from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours, and 45 minutes at night. The aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, on inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains and cover the 32 counties. They can also assist in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and can transport offshore firefighters and ambulance teams. The Irish Coast Guard volunteers units are expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time of departing from the station house in ten minutes from notification during daylight and 20 minutes at night. They are also expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time to the scene of the incident in less than 60 minutes from notification by day and 75 minutes at night, subject to geographical limitations.

Units are managed by an officer-in-charge (three stripes on the uniform) and a deputy officer in charge (two stripes). Each team is trained in search skills, first aid, setting up helicopter landing sites and a range of maritime skills, while certain units are also trained in cliff rescue.

Volunteers receive an allowance for time spent on exercises and call-outs. What is the difference between the Irish Coast Guard and the RNLI? The RNLI is a registered charity which has been saving lives at sea since 1824, and runs a 24/7 volunteer lifeboat service around the British and Irish coasts. It is a declared asset of the British Maritime and Coast Guard Agency and the Irish Coast Guard. Community Rescue Boats Ireland is a community rescue network of volunteers under the auspices of Water Safety Ireland.

No, it does not charge for rescue and nor do the RNLI or Community Rescue Boats Ireland.

The marine rescue centres maintain 19 VHF voice and DSC radio sites around the Irish coastline and a digital paging system. There are two VHF repeater test sites, four MF radio sites and two NAVTEX transmitter sites. Does Ireland have a national search and rescue plan? The first national search and rescue plan was published in July, 2019. It establishes the national framework for the overall development, deployment and improvement of search and rescue services within the Irish Search and Rescue Region and to meet domestic and international commitments. The purpose of the national search and rescue plan is to promote a planned and nationally coordinated search and rescue response to persons in distress at sea, in the air or on land.

Yes, the Irish Coast Guard is responsible for responding to spills of oil and other hazardous substances with the Irish pollution responsibility zone, along with providing an effective response to marine casualties and monitoring or intervening in marine salvage operations. It provides and maintains a 24-hour marine pollution notification at the three marine rescue centres. It coordinates exercises and tests of national and local pollution response plans.

The first Irish Coast Guard volunteer to die on duty was Caitriona Lucas, a highly trained member of the Doolin Coast Guard unit, while assisting in a search for a missing man by the Kilkee unit in September 2016. Six months later, four Irish Coast Guard helicopter crew – Dara Fitzpatrick, Mark Duffy, Paul Ormsby and Ciarán Smith -died when their Sikorsky S-92 struck Blackrock island off the Mayo coast on March 14, 2017. The Dublin-based Rescue 116 crew were providing "top cover" or communications for a medical emergency off the west coast and had been approaching Blacksod to refuel. Up until the five fatalities, the Irish Coast Guard recorded that more than a million "man hours" had been spent on more than 30,000 rescue missions since 1991.

Several investigations were initiated into each incident. The Marine Casualty Investigation Board was critical of the Irish Coast Guard in its final report into the death of Caitriona Lucas, while a separate Health and Safety Authority investigation has been completed, but not published. The Air Accident Investigation Unit final report into the Rescue 116 helicopter crash has not yet been published.

The Irish Coast Guard in its present form dates back to 1991, when the Irish Marine Emergency Service was formed after a campaign initiated by Dr Joan McGinley to improve air/sea rescue services on the west Irish coast. Before Irish independence, the British Admiralty was responsible for a Coast Guard (formerly the Water Guard or Preventative Boat Service) dating back to 1809. The West Coast Search and Rescue Action Committee was initiated with a public meeting in Killybegs, Co Donegal, in 1988 and the group was so effective that a Government report was commissioned, which recommended setting up a new division of the Department of the Marine to run the Marine Rescue Co-Ordination Centre (MRCC), then based at Shannon, along with the existing coast radio service, and coast and cliff rescue. A medium-range helicopter base was established at Shannon within two years. Initially, the base was served by the Air Corps.

The first director of what was then IMES was Capt Liam Kirwan, who had spent 20 years at sea and latterly worked with the Marine Survey Office. Capt Kirwan transformed a poorly funded voluntary coast and cliff rescue service into a trained network of cliff and sea rescue units – largely voluntary, but with paid management. The MRCC was relocated from Shannon to an IMES headquarters at the then Department of the Marine (now Department of Transport) in Leeson Lane, Dublin. The coast radio stations at Valentia, Co Kerry, and Malin Head, Co Donegal, became marine rescue-sub-centres.

The current director is Chris Reynolds, who has been in place since August 2007 and was formerly with the Naval Service. He has been seconded to the head of mission with the EUCAP Somalia - which has a mandate to enhance Somalia's maritime civilian law enforcement capacity – since January 2019.

  • Achill, Co. Mayo
  • Ardmore, Co. Waterford
  • Arklow, Co. Wicklow
  • Ballybunion, Co. Kerry
  • Ballycotton, Co. Cork
  • Ballyglass, Co. Mayo
  • Bonmahon, Co. Waterford
  • Bunbeg, Co. Donegal
  • Carnsore, Co. Wexford
  • Castlefreake, Co. Cork
  • Castletownbere, Co. Cork
  • Cleggan, Co. Galway
  • Clogherhead, Co. Louth
  • Costelloe Bay, Co. Galway
  • Courtown, Co. Wexford
  • Crosshaven, Co. Cork
  • Curracloe, Co. Wexford
  • Dingle, Co. Kerry
  • Doolin, Co. Clare
  • Drogheda, Co. Louth
  • Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
  • Dunmore East, Co. Waterford
  • Fethard, Co. Wexford
  • Glandore, Co. Cork
  • Glenderry, Co. Kerry
  • Goleen, Co. Cork
  • Greencastle, Co. Donegal
  • Greenore, Co. Louth
  • Greystones, Co. Wicklow
  • Guileen, Co. Cork
  • Howth, Co. Dublin
  • Kilkee, Co. Clare
  • Killala, Co. Mayo
  • Killybegs, Co. Donegal
  • Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
  • Knightstown, Co. Kerry
  • Mulroy, Co. Donegal
  • North Aran, Co. Galway
  • Old Head Of Kinsale, Co. Cork
  • Oysterhaven, Co. Cork
  • Rosslare, Co. Wexford
  • Seven Heads, Co. Cork
  • Skerries, Co. Dublin Summercove, Co. Cork
  • Toe Head, Co. Cork
  • Tory Island, Co. Donegal
  • Tramore, Co. Waterford
  • Waterville, Co. Kerry
  • Westport, Co. Mayo
  • Wicklow
  • Youghal, Co. Cork

Sources: Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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