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Displaying items by tag: MGM Boats

Ireland's MGM Boats have received the 'Prestige Yachts Dealer of the Year Award' at the Jeanneau Dealer Conference in Turkey last weekend.

MGM Boats, who are headquartered in Dun Laoghaire Harbour but who have bases in Cork and Belfast and on the River Shannon, have represented the brand since 2002 and have been part of the consulting team to assist in design concepts and market research for the brand. In April, they delivered a new Prestige 620 Sport to The Conway Club, a beds–on–board concept company in St Kathrines Dock in London's docklands.

The firm's Martin Salmon told Afloat.ie 'it is a great achievement for us to win this award. We have had a very close relationship with the Prestige team for the past 15 years and are looking forward to future sales and many of them'.

Prestige 620sA Prestige 620, similar to one sold by MGM Boats in April Photo: Jeanneau
The Prestige range is available in three distinct model lines: Flybridge, Express, and Sport Top in size range 42 to 75 feet.

Created over 20 years ago, Prestige is now an internationally recognised brand, present on four continents through a network of specialised dealers trained by the shipyard. There are currently over 2,500 Prestige owners worldwide.

Published in MGM Boats
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A new Lagoon catamaran 40 model will be available this Autumn.

Builders say the new size represents a combining of two Lagoon generations, the 39 and 400. The new yacht has aft rigging for greater performance and a self-tacking jib for easier manoeuvring.

The cockpit, like the highly successful 42, has a well-thought out interior by Nauta Design. The new 40 is available with three or four cabins.

Lagoon is also offering a new 50–footer. With its two new models, Lagoon now offers a full line of catamarans from 38 to 77 feet.

The model is available from yacht brokers MGM Boats Ltd in Ireland.

Published in Boat Sales
Tagged under

“I’m busier now than I was in June or July” is the cheerful response from John McDonald down in Kinsale at the south coast MGM Boats boats for sale office writes W M Nixon. Normally there’s a slowing down of sales as Autumn draws in, or brokers might find their time being taken up by the perennial tyre-kickers who will only move if an absolute bargain is in the offing. But September 2016 has been different.

The affable and informative McDonald reckons it’s the post-Brexit effect. Much and all as Brexit on June 23rd was only an electoral decision, and nothing concrete has as yet flowed from it – indeed, it could take years for any significant changes to kick in – the feeling is that when a major decision is coming down the line, every other decision is deferred. So the fact that a decision has been made, whatever about its longterm consequences, is better than a state of uncertainty.

For Irish boat buyers and sellers, the main interest lay in the effect on the euro-sterling rate of exchange, and we’ve reported on Afloat.ie about the way Howth YC maximised on the initial plunge in sterling by sending off a very focused procurement team to the Solent area in search of four good J/80s for use in the club’s sailing development programme. They hit the ground running to find the exchange rate in such such a sweet place that they came back with five J/80s.

But now things have stabilised, rates of exchange seem to have settled down with sterling at a lower level, and boat buyers can move with a clear idea of the true comparable prices between boats in the Euro zone and across the water.

This Westerly Fulmar 32 is back on the market with MGM Boats through a change in the owner’s circumstances. The significance is that an already good example of the noted collaboration between leading designer Ed Dubois and volume boatbuilders Westerly Marine is available at a price of €33,950 which seems even more attractive when you factor in the impressive array of new equipment and sails she has acquired during the past year.

The Westerly Fulmar 32 is the very epitome of a “sensible” boat. She’s a big 32–footer, yet the designer didn’t try to shoehorn in more accommodation than there was comfortably room for, and the result is she actually seems even bigger than she really is.

But this doesn’t come with an impairment of performance. On the contrary, the Fulmar achieves the ideal of a more-than-respectable average speed when sailing on a cruising passage, and it’s all done in a sea-kindly boat in which the miles slip effortlessly by. In this case, the high standard of equipment is matched by a very good general level of maintenance, providing the ideal package in a very attractive size range, details here

Published in Boat Sales

The 48th Southampton Boat Show kicked off to a fantastic first four days over the weekend with strong sales results being reported and Irish boat firms are among the winners in boat brokerage business.

An impressive 23 brands made their World debut on opening day, Friday 16 September, from the likes of global brands Oyster Yachts, Princess Yachts, Bavaria Power, Sunseeker International and Haines Marine. Seven others will have made their European debuts, with 72 UK debuts and 33 new boats being welcomed to the Show over the next seven days.

Over 1,500 have already got out on the water for free with the Show’s Try-A-Boat attraction which sees visitors climb onboard the latest RIBs and luxury yachts, and the Get Afloat! area, where 8-16 year olds can try out dinghy sailing and Stand Up Paddleboarding.

Murray Ellis, Managing Director of British Marine Boat Shows, comments: “We’ve had a terrific start to the 2016 Show. We are already hearing of strong sales reports from our exhibitors with many reporting an increase compared to this time last year. As a global Show, attracting exhibitors and visitors from around the world, this is an important aspect of retaining the strong business reputation of the Southampton Boat Show.”

'It has been very busy so far on this stand and we are up 10% on last year in listings and enquiries' Martin Salmon of MGM Boats told Afloat.ie. 'We have just shy of 200 boats on the wall and the customer feedback has been excellent'.

MGM Boats have been consistent exhibitors at the UK show throughout the recession and appear to be reaping some rewards. 'There is definitely an appreciation from the public of the effort and consistency of our boat show presentations', Salmon said. 'A lot of people have remarked about the half hearted efforts of their local brokerage companies just listing on the web and sitting back waiting on the phone to ring'  'I am very confident that we will achieve multiple sales and sign up plenty of new listings as a result of this show', he added.

Kiran Haslam, Marketing Director at Princess Yachts, comments: "Fantastic feeling; the sun has been shining today, and our hospitality area as well as our yachts on display are buzzing with show visitors and invited guests. The right conversations are taking place and we are delighted with the organisation of the show this year."

Commenting on the strong retail sales figures, Sean Robertson, Sunseeker International’s Sales Director, said: “The first weekend at Southampton Boat Show has been extraordinary and we are pleased that the Manhattan 52 has commanded so much interest; testament to our substantial investment in new model development which is having broad appeal from both existing clients and customers new to the brand, keen to join the Sunseeker family. The show has predicted to attract over 110,000 people over the ten day period and we look forward to welcoming even more visitors to the stand.”

Sebastian Hirst, Head of Sales for Sunsail and The Moorings, said: “It has been a great Southampton Boat Show so far for us. We have taken more bookings so far this show than we would usually expect, with more people committing to booking here and now, rather than taking the quote and contacting us later. We are also impressed with the busy buzz about the Show and we are very happy with the new layout of Ocean Hall and our stand position – it feels much more open and welcoming.”

Paul Martin of BHG Marine, said: “The start of the Southampton Boat Show 2016 has been promising, with great interest in our new products and higher levels of interest than we anticipated. We are confident that by the end of the week the enthusiasm will continue.”

The Show opened to the British Sailing Team, including Olympic medallists, Giles Scott, Saskia Clark, Hannah Mills and Nick Dempsey alongside award-winning actress, Michelle Keegan. Gold medal winner, Giles said: “The Southampton Boat Show is a highlight on any sailor’s calendar and is a great place to spend time with family and friends. It’s something everyone should experience”.

Featuring one of Europe’s largest purpose-built marinas, the event will play host to lots more activity over the next seven days. Today, Tuesday 20 September, saw nearly 60 apprentices celebrating their graduation whilst British Marine’s new careers video was also launched on the Show’s Festival Stage powered by Datatag & the COMPASS scheme. The Show will also welcome the Rt Hon John Hayes MP, Minister of State for Transport, on Wednesday, 21 September.

Published in Marine Trade

The Southampton Boat Show kicked off this weekend with special guests, Michelle Keegan and the British Sailing Team in attendance. Running until Sunday 25 September, the Show will showcase the very best that the international boating world has to offer. With hundreds of boats on display, including 330 on the stunning marina itself, the Southampton Boat Show is a festival of boating fun for all the family.

Already there has been a boost for Irish exhibitor MGM Boats with its agency for the Lagoon Catamaran voted best by UK Sailing title, Sailing Today.

Key Irish Marine Industry figures are expected to the show this week including Irish Marine Federation Chairman Damien Offer, Paal Janson of Dun Laoghaire Marina, Brian O'Sullivan from O'Sullivan's Marine in Tralee. Also exhibiting at the show is Conor Fanning with the X-Yacht brand. Bernard Gallagher and James Kirwan of BJ Marine in Greystones will be on the Beneteau stand.

MGM Boats is celebrating after the Lagoon 42 was announced as the winner in the Multihull category in the 2016 awards, which were presented at a champagne reception on Friday , the opening day of the Show. MGM Boats is the Irish dealer for Lagoon Catamarans.

southampton boat showSouthampton boat show is attracting the crowds. Photo: World Wide Images

On the back of her new hit BBC show, Our Girl, multi-award winning actress Michelle Keegan officially opened the Southampton Boat Show 2016. Michelle said “I’m so excited to be a part of this year’s Show. I’ve been fortunate enough to spend time onboard boats around the world, but there’s nothing like seeing all these spectacular boats displayed together in one place here in the UK. It’s an incredible experience.”

The Show also played host to the British Sailing Team, which included Olympic medallists, Giles Scott, Saskia Clark, Hannah Mills and Nick Dempsey. Gold medal winner, Giles Scott said: “The Southampton Boat Show is a highlight on any sailor’s calendar and is a great place to spend time with family and friends. It’s something everyone should experience”. Saskia Clark, Women’s 470 sailing gold medallist, said: “Having an annual event like the Southampton Boat Show that gives the opportunities for people to try out different types of water activities is crucial for the sport of sailing. Who knows, maybe the next generations of Olympic medallists are among us here today?”

Featuring one of Europe’s largest purpose-built marinas, and as one of the world’s top 10 Boat Shows, the event plays host to lots of family-friendly attractions, including:

• Plenty of free on-water experiences, including Try-a-Boat, offering unique opportunities onboard the latest RIBs to luxury yachts, and the Get Afloat! attraction, where 8-16 year olds can try out dinghy sailing and Stand Up Paddleboarding
• The Festival Stage, powered by Datatag & the COMPASS scheme, hosting live music, talks from boating professionals and fashion shows across the 10-day event
• A number of spectacular air displays over the Marina, powered by KUBE, including performances from the Royal Navy Parachute Display Team and renowned British fighter aircraft, the Supermarine Spitfire and Hawker Hurricane
• The magnificent Artemis tall ship, with visitors being able to climb aboard her stunning deck
• Bumper Boats, sponsored by Sunseeker in support of Macmillan Cancer Trust, offering the younger Show visitors the opportunity to master steering

Over the course of the Show, visitors will be able to explore over 130 debuting boats. Among them are the World debuting Hanse 588, Cormate U23 Racing Edition and Greenline Hybrid 36, and the UK launch of the Azimut 55S and Sunseeker Predator 68 MK II.

There’s close to 600 brands exhibiting at the Show this year, with nearly 30 of these making their first appearance, including powerboat manufacturers BIC Aluminium and Alpha-Centauri and sail yacht brands North Carolina (EDPNC) and Nautor’s Swan.

Flights from Dublin to Southampton include handy day return schedules with Flybe

Published in Marine Trade

Prizes in 14 divisions plus were presented at Dublin Bay Sailing Club's (DBSC) MGM Cruiser Challenge on Sunday after two days of competition at the annual end–of–season regatta hosted this year by the Royal St. George Yacht Club

Race results for all classes are here and below are photos from the well attended prizegiving at the Royal St. George YC by Joe Fallon. Scroll down to the end of the page for a photo gallery. 

Chris Moore congratulates John Counihan Regatta Director 2DBSC Commodore Chris Moore (right) congratulates John Counihan Cruiser Challenge Regatta Director. Photo: Joe Fallon

DBSC MGM Cruiser Challenge 2MGM Cruiser Challenge prizes

Henry Leonard Sigma 33 Winner 2Jonathan Nicholson of DBSC with Henry Leonard, Sigma 33 Winner Photo: Joe FallonFrank Heath and Cillian MeldonFrank Heath and Cillian Meldon from the Beneteau 31.7s Photo: Joe FallonFlor O Driscoll and the J24sFlor O Driscoll and the J24s Photo: Joe Fallon

J24 TeamAbove and below J24 teamsJ24 Winners

Howard KnotWhite Sail's Howard Knot (left) with Jonathan Nicholson

Lorcan Balfe and cillian MeldonLorcan Balfe and Cillian Meldon from the 31.7s Photo: Joe FallonLeslie Parnell and Jonathan NicholsonLeslie Parnell (left) and DBSC's Jonathan NicholsonMyles KellyDBSC's Jonathan Nicholson (left) with Myles Kelly

Terese Tyrell and Jonathan NicholsonTerese Tyrrell and DBSC's Jonathan Nicholson Photo: Joe Fallon

Sandra Race Office 1Sandra Moore of the DBSC Race Office with Jonathan NicholsonSome of the Committee boat teamsSome of the DBSC Committee boat teams

Jonathan Nicholson with Tim Costello PROJonathan Nicholson (left) with Tim Costello DBSC PRO

 
Published in DBSC

Quarter Tonner Cartoon from the Royal Irish Yacht Club was the class three IRC winner of this weekend's MGM Boats sponsored DBSC Cruiser Challenge. In two days of very contrasting weather, the 14 divisions concluded this evening in light winds and bright sunshine. Saturday's racing was dominated by heavy downpours. The all–black quarter–tonner owned by Sybil McCormack and Ken Lawless was four points clear of Asterix from the DMYC. Third was RIYC yacht Barry Cunningham's Quest. 

Tim Goodbody's J109 White Mischief was the winner of the biggest fleet in the DBSC Challenge. The Royal Irish sailor was the winner by one point from club mate Colin Byrne in the XP–33 Bon Exemple. The 15–boat IRC one division also featured new J109 entry on the bay, Chimaera, sailed by Royal St. George's Andrew Craig.

Up to five races were sailed in some classes but others sailed only two.

Full results for all classes are downloadable below.

Published in DBSC

Irish Jeanneau dealers MGM Boats have announced details of the latest Jeanneau yacht, the Jeanneau 51 that is designed to complement the existing 'Yacht line' as an entry crossover from the regular Sun Odyssey line. The new model joins the 54, 57 and 64. 

According to MGM's John McDonald based at the firm's Kinsale office 'the new model draws on the design cues of the 54 yacht (30+ ordered already in 12 months) with chaise lounges on either side of he companionway forward sun pad, large cockpit area, luxurious interior and master cabin forward with VIP cabin aft.

 

 

Published in Boat Sales
Tagged under

Most folk will think of sailing boats when they dream of breaking away from everyday life, and voyaging towards the distant horizon with all those exotic places and ports beyond writes W M Nixon. But some very special motor-cruisers evoke the same feelings, and when you contemplate the potential of this twelve-year-old Trader 535 from MGM Boats in Dun Laoghaire, you can almost see the palm trees waving gently in the breeze beside some secluded and sheltered paradise island anchorage, and this handsome craft set in the midst of it riding gently to her cable.

Yet you don’t need to be in the world’s warmer cruising zones to appreciate this Tarquin Marine design’s attractions. She has been created with all-weather comfort in mind in a successful hybrid concept. There’s just enough of a hint of the trawler yacht about her to give the reassurance of rugged seagoing ability, while at the same time there’s a sweeping elegance to her lines which means she still looks well in the most stylish company.

Be warned, however, that this is not a boat for the casual sailor. By that I don’t mean you have to be a complete techie to run her – she is conceived and organized very much with the reasonably competent owner-skipper in mind, and you don’t have to be a fully qualified marine engineer to get confident use of her. But the point I’m trying to make is that to do justice to a boat of this calibre, you should be thinking of frequent use, and living aboard for long periods as you make leisurely voyages along fascinating coastlines – as she’s currently based in Dun Laoghaire, a proper and detailed round Ireland cruise would be a good start.

She’s pushing towards 55ft in overall length, so it’s reassuring to know that in addition to 510hp provided through the main power plant, she has both bow and stern thruster to assist with berthing in tricky corners. For the fact is, the Trader 535 is a proper little ship. She’s laid out for civilised adult living with sleeping space for just six with two double cabins, two bathrooms, plus a twin.

A feature which genuine seagoing types will appreciate is that the galley is aft of the saloon, which minimises motion for that most valuable crewmember the ship’s cook, while maximizing space with the aft chines in the hull facilitating exceptionally large stowage lockers.

Although she was built in Taiwan and has the inevitable Taiwanese teak in preponderance on deck and round the cockpit, below it’s refreshing to find the featured timber in the luxurious accommodation is solid maple, which thanks to its paler hue provides an additional and very real impression of welcome airiness.

At a practical level, her hull below the waterline was Coppercoated in 2010, and this is still providing a most effective anti-foulant, as well as indicating that she has been in a caring ownership. The quoted price of €317,750.00 is indicative of the size and quality of the vessel under consideration, though it compares well with comparable craft elsewhere. More details from John McDonald of MGM Boats and the full advert here.

Published in Boat Sales
Tagged under

Dun Laoghaire Marina, MGM Boats and Frank Keane BMW celebrated the start of the 2016 boating season at the weekend, showcasing a range of 'the finest' boats and cars available in Dublin.

A number of both new and used craft were available to view off the gangway at the country's largest marina, including an impressive Lagoon catamaran, Jeanneau power and sail craft, all resplendent in the weekend's summer sunshine.

Page 5 of 9

The Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard is Ireland's fourth 'Blue Light' service (along with An Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service). It provides a nationwide maritime emergency organisation as well as a variety of services to shipping and other government agencies.

The purpose of the Irish Coast Guard is to promote safety and security standards, and by doing so, prevent as far as possible, the loss of life at sea, and on inland waters, mountains and caves, and to provide effective emergency response services and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The Irish Coast Guard has responsibility for Ireland's system of marine communications, surveillance and emergency management in Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and certain inland waterways.

It is responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue and counter-pollution and ship casualty operations. It also has responsibility for vessel traffic monitoring.

Operations in respect of maritime security, illegal drug trafficking, illegal migration and fisheries enforcement are co-ordinated by other bodies within the Irish Government.

On average, each year, the Irish Coast Guard is expected to:

  • handle 3,000 marine emergencies
  • assist 4,500 people and save about 200 lives
  • task Coast Guard helicopters on missions

The Coast Guard has been around in some form in Ireland since 1908.

Coast Guard helicopters

The Irish Coast Guard has contracted five medium-lift Sikorsky Search and Rescue helicopters deployed at bases in Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo.

The helicopters are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours and 45 minutes at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice based at Waterford.

These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties).

They can also be used for assistance in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations as authorised by the Coast Guard within appropriate regulations.

Irish Coastguard FAQs

The Irish Coast Guard provides nationwide maritime emergency response, while also promoting safety and security standards. It aims to prevent the loss of life at sea, on inland waters, on mountains and in caves; and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The main role of the Irish Coast Guard is to rescue people from danger at sea or on land, to organise immediate medical transport and to assist boats and ships within the country's jurisdiction. It has three marine rescue centres in Dublin, Malin Head, Co Donegal, and Valentia Island, Co Kerry. The Dublin National Maritime Operations centre provides marine search and rescue responses and coordinates the response to marine casualty incidents with the Irish exclusive economic zone (EEZ).

Yes, effectively, it is the fourth "blue light" service. The Marine Rescue Sub-Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for the coastal area between Ballycotton, Co Cork and Clifden, Co Galway. At the same time, the MRSC Malin Head covers the area between Clifden and Lough Foyle. Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC) Dublin covers Carlingford Lough, Co Louth to Ballycotton, Co Cork. Each MRCC/MRSC also broadcasts maritime safety information on VHF and MF radio, including navigational and gale warnings, shipping forecasts, local inshore forecasts, strong wind warnings and small craft warnings.

The Irish Coast Guard handles about 3,000 marine emergencies annually, and assists 4,500 people - saving an estimated 200 lives, according to the Department of Transport. In 2016, Irish Coast Guard helicopters completed 1,000 missions in a single year for the first time.

Yes, Irish Coast Guard helicopters evacuate medical patients from offshore islands to hospital on average about 100 times a year. In September 2017, the Department of Health announced that search and rescue pilots who work 24-hour duties would not be expected to perform any inter-hospital patient transfers. The Air Corps flies the Emergency Aeromedical Service, established in 2012 and using an AW139 twin-engine helicopter. Known by its call sign "Air Corps 112", it airlifted its 3,000th patient in autumn 2020.

The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the British Maritime and Coastguard Agency, which is responsible for the Northern Irish coast.

The Irish Coast Guard is a State-funded service, with both paid management personnel and volunteers, and is under the auspices of the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport. It is allocated approximately 74 million euro annually in funding, some 85 per cent of which pays for a helicopter contract that costs 60 million euro annually. The overall funding figure is "variable", an Oireachtas committee was told in 2019. Other significant expenditure items include volunteer training exercises, equipment, maintenance, renewal, and information technology.

The Irish Coast Guard has four search and rescue helicopter bases at Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo, run on a contract worth 50 million euro annually with an additional 10 million euro in costs by CHC Ireland. It provides five medium-lift Sikorsky S-92 helicopters and trained crew. The 44 Irish Coast Guard coastal units with 1,000 volunteers are classed as onshore search units, with 23 of the 44 units having rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) and 17 units having cliff rescue capability. The Irish Coast Guard has 60 buildings in total around the coast, and units have search vehicles fitted with blue lights, all-terrain vehicles or quads, first aid equipment, generators and area lighting, search equipment, marine radios, pyrotechnics and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Community Rescue Boats Ireland also provide lifeboats and crews to assist in search and rescue. The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the Garda Siochána, National Ambulance Service, Naval Service and Air Corps, Civil Defence, while fishing vessels, ships and other craft at sea offer assistance in search operations.

The helicopters are designated as airborne from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours, and 45 minutes at night. The aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, on inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains and cover the 32 counties. They can also assist in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and can transport offshore firefighters and ambulance teams. The Irish Coast Guard volunteers units are expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time of departing from the station house in ten minutes from notification during daylight and 20 minutes at night. They are also expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time to the scene of the incident in less than 60 minutes from notification by day and 75 minutes at night, subject to geographical limitations.

Units are managed by an officer-in-charge (three stripes on the uniform) and a deputy officer in charge (two stripes). Each team is trained in search skills, first aid, setting up helicopter landing sites and a range of maritime skills, while certain units are also trained in cliff rescue.

Volunteers receive an allowance for time spent on exercises and call-outs. What is the difference between the Irish Coast Guard and the RNLI? The RNLI is a registered charity which has been saving lives at sea since 1824, and runs a 24/7 volunteer lifeboat service around the British and Irish coasts. It is a declared asset of the British Maritime and Coast Guard Agency and the Irish Coast Guard. Community Rescue Boats Ireland is a community rescue network of volunteers under the auspices of Water Safety Ireland.

No, it does not charge for rescue and nor do the RNLI or Community Rescue Boats Ireland.

The marine rescue centres maintain 19 VHF voice and DSC radio sites around the Irish coastline and a digital paging system. There are two VHF repeater test sites, four MF radio sites and two NAVTEX transmitter sites. Does Ireland have a national search and rescue plan? The first national search and rescue plan was published in July, 2019. It establishes the national framework for the overall development, deployment and improvement of search and rescue services within the Irish Search and Rescue Region and to meet domestic and international commitments. The purpose of the national search and rescue plan is to promote a planned and nationally coordinated search and rescue response to persons in distress at sea, in the air or on land.

Yes, the Irish Coast Guard is responsible for responding to spills of oil and other hazardous substances with the Irish pollution responsibility zone, along with providing an effective response to marine casualties and monitoring or intervening in marine salvage operations. It provides and maintains a 24-hour marine pollution notification at the three marine rescue centres. It coordinates exercises and tests of national and local pollution response plans.

The first Irish Coast Guard volunteer to die on duty was Caitriona Lucas, a highly trained member of the Doolin Coast Guard unit, while assisting in a search for a missing man by the Kilkee unit in September 2016. Six months later, four Irish Coast Guard helicopter crew – Dara Fitzpatrick, Mark Duffy, Paul Ormsby and Ciarán Smith -died when their Sikorsky S-92 struck Blackrock island off the Mayo coast on March 14, 2017. The Dublin-based Rescue 116 crew were providing "top cover" or communications for a medical emergency off the west coast and had been approaching Blacksod to refuel. Up until the five fatalities, the Irish Coast Guard recorded that more than a million "man hours" had been spent on more than 30,000 rescue missions since 1991.

Several investigations were initiated into each incident. The Marine Casualty Investigation Board was critical of the Irish Coast Guard in its final report into the death of Caitriona Lucas, while a separate Health and Safety Authority investigation has been completed, but not published. The Air Accident Investigation Unit final report into the Rescue 116 helicopter crash has not yet been published.

The Irish Coast Guard in its present form dates back to 1991, when the Irish Marine Emergency Service was formed after a campaign initiated by Dr Joan McGinley to improve air/sea rescue services on the west Irish coast. Before Irish independence, the British Admiralty was responsible for a Coast Guard (formerly the Water Guard or Preventative Boat Service) dating back to 1809. The West Coast Search and Rescue Action Committee was initiated with a public meeting in Killybegs, Co Donegal, in 1988 and the group was so effective that a Government report was commissioned, which recommended setting up a new division of the Department of the Marine to run the Marine Rescue Co-Ordination Centre (MRCC), then based at Shannon, along with the existing coast radio service, and coast and cliff rescue. A medium-range helicopter base was established at Shannon within two years. Initially, the base was served by the Air Corps.

The first director of what was then IMES was Capt Liam Kirwan, who had spent 20 years at sea and latterly worked with the Marine Survey Office. Capt Kirwan transformed a poorly funded voluntary coast and cliff rescue service into a trained network of cliff and sea rescue units – largely voluntary, but with paid management. The MRCC was relocated from Shannon to an IMES headquarters at the then Department of the Marine (now Department of Transport) in Leeson Lane, Dublin. The coast radio stations at Valentia, Co Kerry, and Malin Head, Co Donegal, became marine rescue-sub-centres.

The current director is Chris Reynolds, who has been in place since August 2007 and was formerly with the Naval Service. He has been seconded to the head of mission with the EUCAP Somalia - which has a mandate to enhance Somalia's maritime civilian law enforcement capacity – since January 2019.

  • Achill, Co. Mayo
  • Ardmore, Co. Waterford
  • Arklow, Co. Wicklow
  • Ballybunion, Co. Kerry
  • Ballycotton, Co. Cork
  • Ballyglass, Co. Mayo
  • Bonmahon, Co. Waterford
  • Bunbeg, Co. Donegal
  • Carnsore, Co. Wexford
  • Castlefreake, Co. Cork
  • Castletownbere, Co. Cork
  • Cleggan, Co. Galway
  • Clogherhead, Co. Louth
  • Costelloe Bay, Co. Galway
  • Courtown, Co. Wexford
  • Crosshaven, Co. Cork
  • Curracloe, Co. Wexford
  • Dingle, Co. Kerry
  • Doolin, Co. Clare
  • Drogheda, Co. Louth
  • Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
  • Dunmore East, Co. Waterford
  • Fethard, Co. Wexford
  • Glandore, Co. Cork
  • Glenderry, Co. Kerry
  • Goleen, Co. Cork
  • Greencastle, Co. Donegal
  • Greenore, Co. Louth
  • Greystones, Co. Wicklow
  • Guileen, Co. Cork
  • Howth, Co. Dublin
  • Kilkee, Co. Clare
  • Killala, Co. Mayo
  • Killybegs, Co. Donegal
  • Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
  • Knightstown, Co. Kerry
  • Mulroy, Co. Donegal
  • North Aran, Co. Galway
  • Old Head Of Kinsale, Co. Cork
  • Oysterhaven, Co. Cork
  • Rosslare, Co. Wexford
  • Seven Heads, Co. Cork
  • Skerries, Co. Dublin Summercove, Co. Cork
  • Toe Head, Co. Cork
  • Tory Island, Co. Donegal
  • Tramore, Co. Waterford
  • Waterville, Co. Kerry
  • Westport, Co. Mayo
  • Wicklow
  • Youghal, Co. Cork

Sources: Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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