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Displaying items by tag: Piers

This beautifully illustrated book explores the history of the fishery piers and harbours of Galway and North Clare. A testament to these structures as feats of engineering, it is also a riveting account of the human aspect that shadowed their construction; a beautiful rendering of the maritime activities that gave life to the Wild Atlantic Way – kelp-making, fishing, turf distribution, and sea-borne trade.

Humble Works for Humble People nurtures the retelling of human stories surrounding the piers, giving voice to the unacknowledged legacy of the lives that were their making. Foreign financial support, humanitarian efforts, controversies and conflict – these are all features of the piers and harbours’ development and preservation. Humble Works for Humble People is a vital contribution to the maritime history of Galway, Clare and of Ireland in general; an overlooked but culturally rich facet of Irish history.

Buy the book online from Afloat.ie's Marine Market here.

Published in Book Review
Tagged under
#piers – The Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Simon Coveney TD, today announced details of a €23m package for the repair of public owned piers, harbours and slipways damaged during the winter storms and for investment in the ongoing development of Ireland's public harbour network.In announcing this initiative, the Minister said "We are all too well aware of the damage wreaked on our harbour network during the winter storms.
 
I am delighted to announce as part of an extended capital programme for 2014, this significant funding for the immediate repair of piers and harbours across the country".
 
€8.5m for 115 storm damaged piers and harbours to assist 11 Local Authorities and the Department of Agriculture, Food & Marine to repair this storm damaged infrastructure. (see tables 1&2 below for details)
 
Funding of €7m for 111 projects to repair Local Authority owned storm damaged harbours, piers and slipways and €1.5m for remediation work at four Department owned, non-Fishery Harbour Centres including €1.3m for North Harbour Cape Clear.

"In addition, a further €14.63m of funding is being provided for harbour development in 2014 and this represents a significant increase on the level of funding provided in 2013. This is an indication of the Government's commitment to developing our fishery harbours for the benefit of our fishing industry, seafood processing sector, other ancillary marine industries, tenants and the wider community. It is part of an ongoing and long term strategy to develop and improve the facilities at our Fishery Harbour Centres and other public harbours around our coast." (see table 3 below for details).

€11.63m of this is allocated towards safety, maintenance and new development works at six Fishery Harbour Centres at Howth, Dunmore East, Castletownbere, Dingle, Ros a Mhíl and Killybegs, in addition to infrastructural improvement works at "bull nose" pier, North Harbour, Cape Clear. This works also includes €4m for dredging works at Dunmore East.

€3m is being allocated for Local Authority Harbour Development and Marine Leisure programmes. The Department is contacting the relevant Local Authorities in relation to applications under this element of the Programme.

Flagship projects in the 2014 Capital Programme include the works at "bull nose" pier Cape Clear, major dredging works at Dunmore East, electrical upgrading in Howth, slipway works at Ros a Mhíl, Castletownbere and Dingle, and a small craft harbour in Killybegs.

The Minister commented that "the projects consisting of €23m in total capital expenditure will repair the storm damage to our vitally important fisheries piers and harbours network and will develop our harbours for the benefit of our seafood industry and the coastal communities dependent on this infrastructure. This package will help to ensure that this important infrastructure is fit for purpose in the modern era and will bring significant added value to local communities and much welcome jobs and economic activity".

 
 
   

Table 1 Departmental owned Non-Fishery Harbour Centres approved for funding under the Storm Damage Programme.

 

Location

Structure Type

DAFM Approved Funding

Cape Clear, Co.Cork.

North Harbour

€1,300,000

Dooagh, Co Mayo

Pier (PLB)

€115,000

Westcove, Co. Kerry

Navigation Beacon (PLB)

€60,000

Gun Rock, Co. Galway

Beacon (PLB)

€40,000

TOTAL

€1,515,000

 

Table 2 Local Authority Projects approved for funding under the Storm Damage Programme

Location

DAFM Approved 2014

90% funding

Cork County Council

 

Pallas Sea Wall, Ardgroom

€36,000

 

Glandore Pier

€180,000

 

Courtmacsherry Harbour

€9,000

 

Letter Pier, Kilcrohane

€27,000

 

Dursey Island Pier

€9,450

 

Travarra Pier

€13,500

 

Cleanderry Slip, Ardgroom

€22,500

 

Gorteen Pier

€9,000

 

Deelish Pier, Skibbereen

€27,000

 

McDonald's Quay Youghal

€72,000

 

Baltimore Pier

€36,000

 

Barleycove Beach

€45,000

Total Cork Co. Co.

€486,450

Waterford County Council

 

Tramore Seawall

€135,000

 

Boatstrand Pier

€315,000

 

Dunmore East Stormwall

€18,000

Total Waterford Co. Co.

€468,000

Wexford County Council

 

Courtown Harbour 1

€477,000

 

Cahore Harbour

€49,500

 

Wexford Harbour

€9,000

 

Kilmore Quay, Harbour 2

€180,000

 

Courtown Harbour 2

€630,000

 

Fethard Harbour

€9,000

 

Slade Harbour

€54,000

 

St Helens Harbour

€45,900

 

Ballyhack Harbour

€45,000

 

Carne Harbour

€13,500

Total Wexford Co. Co.

€1,512,900

Mayo County Council

 

Roonagh Pier

€18,000

 

Porturlin Harbour

€135,000

 

Purtoon, Inishturk Pier

€27,000

 

Kilcummin Harbour

€63,000

 

Killala Harbour

€63,000

 

Inishbiggle Pontoon

€27,000

 

Clare Island Pier & Slipway

€76,500

 

Islandmore Pontoon

€18,000

 

Mulranny Pier

€67,500

 

Old Head Pier

€12,600

 

Blackshod Pier

€72,000

 

Carramore Pier

€47,700

 

Killerduff Harbour

€135,000

 

Rathlacken Harbour

€135,000

 

Saleen Harbour

€90,000

 

Lecanvey Pier

€10,800

 

Bunlough Slipway

€9,000

 

Faulmore Slipway

€45,000

 

Belderrigh Pier, Ballycastle

€90,000

 

Inishkea Island Pier

€45,000

 

Frenchport Pier, Belmullet

€18,000

 

Westport Quay

€27,000

Total Mayo Co. Co.

€1,232,100

Sligo County Council

 

Mullaghmore Harbour

€89,100

 

Enniscrone Pier

€61,200

Total Sligo Co. Co.

€150,300

Galway County Council

 

Cé na Trá Ban, Lettermore

€198,000

 

Cé an Mace, Carna

€90,000

 

Cé Cora Point, Inis Meáin

€135,000

 

Cé Sruthan Pier, An Cheathru Rua

€216,000

 

Cé Inis Oírr Slipway, Inis Oírr

€108,000

 

Cé Annaghvaan, Lettermore

€180,000

 

Seán Céibh Spideál

€135,000

 

Cé Spideál Nua

€90,000

 

Cé Inis Oírr Slipway, Inis Oírr

€90,000

 

Cé Dolan

€108,000

 

Cé Pointe, An Ceathru Rua

€180,000

 

Cé Sruthan Bui, Rosmuc

€135,000

 

Cé Caladh Thaidh

€108,000

 

Cé Finnis, Finnis Island

€135,000

 

Cé Rossadilisk

€108,000

Total Galway Co. Co.

€2,016,000

Kerry County Council

 

Local Aids to Navigation

€19,350

 

Kilmakilogue Pier

€18,675

 

Tahilla Pier

€5,850

 

Blackwater Pier

€675

 

Cuan Pier

€2,700

 

Coonanna Pier

€1,125

 

Cooscrome Pier

€7,650

 

Fenit Pier

€7,740

 

Knightstown Pier

€6,750

 

Dromatoor Pier

€7,650

 

Bunnavalla Pier

€4,500

 

Dunquin Pier

€27,000

 

Brandon Pier

€4,500

Total Kerry Co. Co.

€114,165

Wicklow County Council

 

Arklow Harbour South Pier

€5,400

Total Wicklow Co. Co.

€5,400

Donegal County Council

 

Mountcharles Pier

€36,000

 

Magherarorty Harbour

€45,000

 

Buncrana Harbour

€45,000

 

Arranmore, Rannagh Pier Slip

€27,000

 

Bundoran Pier

€7,200

 

Malinmore Pier

€6,750

 

Doonalt Pier (near Glencolmcille)

€6,750

 

Bruckless Pier

€16,200

 

Port Inver

€18,000

 

Cladnageeragh Pier (near Kilcar)

€22,500

 

Portsalon Pier

€22,500

 

Bunaniver Pier

€31,500

 

Wyon Point & Rinnalea Navigation Lights

€9,000

 

Nancy's Rock Navigation Perch

€31,500

 

Cassan Sound Pier

€9,000

 

Malinbeg, Ballyederlan, Gortalia, Tawney (Piers & Slipways)

€18,000

 

Donegal Town Pier

€3,600

 

Bunagee Pier

€135,000

 

Ballysaggart Pier

€13,500

 

Owey Island Pier

€27,000

 

Rathmullan Pier

€27,000

 

Leabgarrow Harbour, Arranmore

€45,000

 

Ballyshannon Harbour

€45,000

 

Curransport Slipway

€9,000

 

Arranmore,Stackamore, Slipway

€6,750

 

Cruit Island Slipway

€6,750

 

Inis Caoraigh Slipway

€18,000

 

Killybegs Harbour, Shore Road

€63,000

Total Donegal Co. Co.

€751,500

Clare County Council

 

Liscannor Pier

€130,950

 

Ballyvaughan Pier

€65,700

 

Seafield Pier

€18,000

 

Kilbaha Pier

€18,000

Total Clare Co. Co.

€232,650

Louth County Council

 

Carlingford Harbour

€4,500

Total Louth Co. Co.

€4,500

   

GRAND TOTAL

€6,973,965

Table 3   2014 Fishery Harbour and Coastal Infrastructure Capital Programme

Location

Project

DAFM Approved Funding

 

Cape Clear, Co. Cork.

Bull Nose Development

€3,000,000

 

Safety & Maintenance Works

€50,000

 

Disability Access Works

€10,000

 
 

Piers, Lights & Beacons

€27,000

 

All Fishery Harbour Centres

Safety & Maintenance

€1,260,000

 

Disability Access

€100,000

 

Howth FHC

Design & Planning for Pontoons between Middle and West Pier

€100,000

 

Syncrolift Platform Painting & Repairs

€80,000

 

Upgrading of Navigational Lights & Markers

€20,000

 

Upgrading Electrical System

€500,000

 

East Pier Repairs

€150,000

 

Castletownbere FHC

Power points & Electrical Upgrade Mainland Quay

€200,000

 

Mainland Quay Perimeter Fencing/Wall

€200,000

 

Harbour Slipway

€300,000

 

Welfare facilities for harbour users (Dinish)

€100,000

 

Syncrolift drainage  – Design & Planning

€150,000

 

An Daingean FHC

CCTV Upgrade

€40,000

 

Main Pier sheet pile condition survey

€40,000

 

Boatyard Slipway Removal

€200,000

 

Ros a Mhíl FHC

Design & Planning for Phase 2 Small Craft Harbour

€31,000

 

Commencement of New Slipway

€133,000

 

Dunmore East FHC

Construction of Harbour Building Extension

€220,000

 

Dredging Works

€4,000,000

 

Killybegs FHC

Safety Mooring (Department Craft)

€20,000

 

Landing Pier Fendering

€30,000

 

Floating work platform

€9,000

 

Synchrolift Carriage

€10,000

 

Repairs to Blackrock Pier

€150,000

 

Small Craft Harbour – Phase 1

€500,000

 

Local Authority Development

Local Authority Programme (excluding storm damage projects)

€3,000,000

 
 

Marine Leisure & Marine Tourism

Local Authorities

 

TOTAL

€14,630,000

 

 

 

   

 

Published in Coastal Notes

#IRISH HARBOURS - Protesters took to the water off Kerry's piers last month in an organised swim drawing attention to proposed harbour bylaws designed to regulate the activities of water users.

“We need to make the public aware they have to make submissions,” Denise Collins told The Irish Times from Kells, which hosted one of the largest swims. “Traditional activities such as swimming will be over-regulated, we fear.”

The proposed bylaws would give Kerry County Council greater control over 16 of the county's 57 harbours and piers, including Kells, Kenmare, Portmagee, Brandon and Ventry.

Under the new bylaws, strict regulations would be placed on the use of loudhailers, landing and unloading passengers and freight, waste and even movement around the harbour.

"Draconian" charges are also set to be imposed on fishermen and other harbour users, while campaingers also feel that a ban on swimming and diving could also be added to the list.

The proposed bylaws already suffered a set-back earlier this year when Kerry County Councillors decided to restart the consultation process to allow the fishing industry, tourism operators and other interests more time to make submissions.

According to the Irish Examiner, only two submissions had been received by the council as of its January monthly meeting, despite senior council officials working for months on the draft proposals.

Cllr Toiréasa Ferris commented that the proposed charges in particular "would have huge implications for fishermen, some of whom might currently be earning only between €40 and €50 for a 14-hour day."

As previously reported on Afloat.ie, charges may also soon be hiked on yachts berthing at Ireland's main fishing harbours, a list that includes Dingle in Co Kerry.

Irish Marine Federation chairman David O'Brien expressed concern at the potential for such charges to damage "the good tourism dividend for coastal towns", noting that for every euro spent on a harbour berth, €10 was normally spent in the locality.

Published in Irish Harbours
4th December 2009

Warrenpoint Harbour Authority

Warrenpoint Harbour Authority

Warrenpoint Harbour Authority seeks to operate profitably within fair and competitive tariff arrangements so that the Port is economically sustainable. Its aim is to contribute as much as possible to the generation of economic wealth within the Port and its regional hinterland.

warrenpoint.jpg

Consequently, profit optimisation, to achieve its primary mission rather than profit maximisation, will be pursued.

 

History

The original Port of Warrenpoint, consisting of a wet dock and piers, was constructed in the late 1770s by Roger Hall, Robert Ross and Isaac Corry with the assistance of £500 of public funds. In 1919 the heirs of Roger Hall sold the Port to John Kelly and Sons for the sum of £16,000. John Kelly continued to operate the Port until 1971 when it was sold to Warrenpoint Harbour Authority for £369,000.

The Port was substantially enlarged with an initial total investment of approximately £6.7million to create the modern Port of Warrenpoint. Until 1971 the Port of Warrenpoint acted as a lightering port for the Port of Newry and jointly these ports handled approximately half a million tonnes of cargo annually. Subsequently the modern Port of Warrenpoint has handled 5 times as much cargo on an annual basis.

Warrenpoint Harbour Authority, The Docks, Warrenpoint, Co. Down, N. Ireland BT34 3JR. Administration/General Enquiries – Tel: 028 417 73381 • Fax: 028 417 52875. Operations – Tel: 028 417 52878 • Fax: 028 417 73962• Email: [email protected]

Published in Warrenpoint Port

The Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard is Ireland's fourth 'Blue Light' service (along with An Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service). It provides a nationwide maritime emergency organisation as well as a variety of services to shipping and other government agencies.

The purpose of the Irish Coast Guard is to promote safety and security standards, and by doing so, prevent as far as possible, the loss of life at sea, and on inland waters, mountains and caves, and to provide effective emergency response services and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The Irish Coast Guard has responsibility for Ireland's system of marine communications, surveillance and emergency management in Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and certain inland waterways.

It is responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue and counter-pollution and ship casualty operations. It also has responsibility for vessel traffic monitoring.

Operations in respect of maritime security, illegal drug trafficking, illegal migration and fisheries enforcement are co-ordinated by other bodies within the Irish Government.

On average, each year, the Irish Coast Guard is expected to:

  • handle 3,000 marine emergencies
  • assist 4,500 people and save about 200 lives
  • task Coast Guard helicopters on missions

The Coast Guard has been around in some form in Ireland since 1908.

Coast Guard helicopters

The Irish Coast Guard has contracted five medium-lift Sikorsky Search and Rescue helicopters deployed at bases in Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo.

The helicopters are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours and 45 minutes at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice based at Waterford.

These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties).

They can also be used for assistance in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations as authorised by the Coast Guard within appropriate regulations.

Irish Coastguard FAQs

The Irish Coast Guard provides nationwide maritime emergency response, while also promoting safety and security standards. It aims to prevent the loss of life at sea, on inland waters, on mountains and in caves; and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The main role of the Irish Coast Guard is to rescue people from danger at sea or on land, to organise immediate medical transport and to assist boats and ships within the country's jurisdiction. It has three marine rescue centres in Dublin, Malin Head, Co Donegal, and Valentia Island, Co Kerry. The Dublin National Maritime Operations centre provides marine search and rescue responses and coordinates the response to marine casualty incidents with the Irish exclusive economic zone (EEZ).

Yes, effectively, it is the fourth "blue light" service. The Marine Rescue Sub-Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for the coastal area between Ballycotton, Co Cork and Clifden, Co Galway. At the same time, the MRSC Malin Head covers the area between Clifden and Lough Foyle. Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC) Dublin covers Carlingford Lough, Co Louth to Ballycotton, Co Cork. Each MRCC/MRSC also broadcasts maritime safety information on VHF and MF radio, including navigational and gale warnings, shipping forecasts, local inshore forecasts, strong wind warnings and small craft warnings.

The Irish Coast Guard handles about 3,000 marine emergencies annually, and assists 4,500 people - saving an estimated 200 lives, according to the Department of Transport. In 2016, Irish Coast Guard helicopters completed 1,000 missions in a single year for the first time.

Yes, Irish Coast Guard helicopters evacuate medical patients from offshore islands to hospital on average about 100 times a year. In September 2017, the Department of Health announced that search and rescue pilots who work 24-hour duties would not be expected to perform any inter-hospital patient transfers. The Air Corps flies the Emergency Aeromedical Service, established in 2012 and using an AW139 twin-engine helicopter. Known by its call sign "Air Corps 112", it airlifted its 3,000th patient in autumn 2020.

The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the British Maritime and Coastguard Agency, which is responsible for the Northern Irish coast.

The Irish Coast Guard is a State-funded service, with both paid management personnel and volunteers, and is under the auspices of the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport. It is allocated approximately 74 million euro annually in funding, some 85 per cent of which pays for a helicopter contract that costs 60 million euro annually. The overall funding figure is "variable", an Oireachtas committee was told in 2019. Other significant expenditure items include volunteer training exercises, equipment, maintenance, renewal, and information technology.

The Irish Coast Guard has four search and rescue helicopter bases at Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo, run on a contract worth 50 million euro annually with an additional 10 million euro in costs by CHC Ireland. It provides five medium-lift Sikorsky S-92 helicopters and trained crew. The 44 Irish Coast Guard coastal units with 1,000 volunteers are classed as onshore search units, with 23 of the 44 units having rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) and 17 units having cliff rescue capability. The Irish Coast Guard has 60 buildings in total around the coast, and units have search vehicles fitted with blue lights, all-terrain vehicles or quads, first aid equipment, generators and area lighting, search equipment, marine radios, pyrotechnics and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Community Rescue Boats Ireland also provide lifeboats and crews to assist in search and rescue. The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the Garda Siochána, National Ambulance Service, Naval Service and Air Corps, Civil Defence, while fishing vessels, ships and other craft at sea offer assistance in search operations.

The helicopters are designated as airborne from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours, and 45 minutes at night. The aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, on inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains and cover the 32 counties. They can also assist in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and can transport offshore firefighters and ambulance teams. The Irish Coast Guard volunteers units are expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time of departing from the station house in ten minutes from notification during daylight and 20 minutes at night. They are also expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time to the scene of the incident in less than 60 minutes from notification by day and 75 minutes at night, subject to geographical limitations.

Units are managed by an officer-in-charge (three stripes on the uniform) and a deputy officer in charge (two stripes). Each team is trained in search skills, first aid, setting up helicopter landing sites and a range of maritime skills, while certain units are also trained in cliff rescue.

Volunteers receive an allowance for time spent on exercises and call-outs. What is the difference between the Irish Coast Guard and the RNLI? The RNLI is a registered charity which has been saving lives at sea since 1824, and runs a 24/7 volunteer lifeboat service around the British and Irish coasts. It is a declared asset of the British Maritime and Coast Guard Agency and the Irish Coast Guard. Community Rescue Boats Ireland is a community rescue network of volunteers under the auspices of Water Safety Ireland.

No, it does not charge for rescue and nor do the RNLI or Community Rescue Boats Ireland.

The marine rescue centres maintain 19 VHF voice and DSC radio sites around the Irish coastline and a digital paging system. There are two VHF repeater test sites, four MF radio sites and two NAVTEX transmitter sites. Does Ireland have a national search and rescue plan? The first national search and rescue plan was published in July, 2019. It establishes the national framework for the overall development, deployment and improvement of search and rescue services within the Irish Search and Rescue Region and to meet domestic and international commitments. The purpose of the national search and rescue plan is to promote a planned and nationally coordinated search and rescue response to persons in distress at sea, in the air or on land.

Yes, the Irish Coast Guard is responsible for responding to spills of oil and other hazardous substances with the Irish pollution responsibility zone, along with providing an effective response to marine casualties and monitoring or intervening in marine salvage operations. It provides and maintains a 24-hour marine pollution notification at the three marine rescue centres. It coordinates exercises and tests of national and local pollution response plans.

The first Irish Coast Guard volunteer to die on duty was Caitriona Lucas, a highly trained member of the Doolin Coast Guard unit, while assisting in a search for a missing man by the Kilkee unit in September 2016. Six months later, four Irish Coast Guard helicopter crew – Dara Fitzpatrick, Mark Duffy, Paul Ormsby and Ciarán Smith -died when their Sikorsky S-92 struck Blackrock island off the Mayo coast on March 14, 2017. The Dublin-based Rescue 116 crew were providing "top cover" or communications for a medical emergency off the west coast and had been approaching Blacksod to refuel. Up until the five fatalities, the Irish Coast Guard recorded that more than a million "man hours" had been spent on more than 30,000 rescue missions since 1991.

Several investigations were initiated into each incident. The Marine Casualty Investigation Board was critical of the Irish Coast Guard in its final report into the death of Caitriona Lucas, while a separate Health and Safety Authority investigation has been completed, but not published. The Air Accident Investigation Unit final report into the Rescue 116 helicopter crash has not yet been published.

The Irish Coast Guard in its present form dates back to 1991, when the Irish Marine Emergency Service was formed after a campaign initiated by Dr Joan McGinley to improve air/sea rescue services on the west Irish coast. Before Irish independence, the British Admiralty was responsible for a Coast Guard (formerly the Water Guard or Preventative Boat Service) dating back to 1809. The West Coast Search and Rescue Action Committee was initiated with a public meeting in Killybegs, Co Donegal, in 1988 and the group was so effective that a Government report was commissioned, which recommended setting up a new division of the Department of the Marine to run the Marine Rescue Co-Ordination Centre (MRCC), then based at Shannon, along with the existing coast radio service, and coast and cliff rescue. A medium-range helicopter base was established at Shannon within two years. Initially, the base was served by the Air Corps.

The first director of what was then IMES was Capt Liam Kirwan, who had spent 20 years at sea and latterly worked with the Marine Survey Office. Capt Kirwan transformed a poorly funded voluntary coast and cliff rescue service into a trained network of cliff and sea rescue units – largely voluntary, but with paid management. The MRCC was relocated from Shannon to an IMES headquarters at the then Department of the Marine (now Department of Transport) in Leeson Lane, Dublin. The coast radio stations at Valentia, Co Kerry, and Malin Head, Co Donegal, became marine rescue-sub-centres.

The current director is Chris Reynolds, who has been in place since August 2007 and was formerly with the Naval Service. He has been seconded to the head of mission with the EUCAP Somalia - which has a mandate to enhance Somalia's maritime civilian law enforcement capacity – since January 2019.

  • Achill, Co. Mayo
  • Ardmore, Co. Waterford
  • Arklow, Co. Wicklow
  • Ballybunion, Co. Kerry
  • Ballycotton, Co. Cork
  • Ballyglass, Co. Mayo
  • Bonmahon, Co. Waterford
  • Bunbeg, Co. Donegal
  • Carnsore, Co. Wexford
  • Castlefreake, Co. Cork
  • Castletownbere, Co. Cork
  • Cleggan, Co. Galway
  • Clogherhead, Co. Louth
  • Costelloe Bay, Co. Galway
  • Courtown, Co. Wexford
  • Crosshaven, Co. Cork
  • Curracloe, Co. Wexford
  • Dingle, Co. Kerry
  • Doolin, Co. Clare
  • Drogheda, Co. Louth
  • Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
  • Dunmore East, Co. Waterford
  • Fethard, Co. Wexford
  • Glandore, Co. Cork
  • Glenderry, Co. Kerry
  • Goleen, Co. Cork
  • Greencastle, Co. Donegal
  • Greenore, Co. Louth
  • Greystones, Co. Wicklow
  • Guileen, Co. Cork
  • Howth, Co. Dublin
  • Kilkee, Co. Clare
  • Killala, Co. Mayo
  • Killybegs, Co. Donegal
  • Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
  • Knightstown, Co. Kerry
  • Mulroy, Co. Donegal
  • North Aran, Co. Galway
  • Old Head Of Kinsale, Co. Cork
  • Oysterhaven, Co. Cork
  • Rosslare, Co. Wexford
  • Seven Heads, Co. Cork
  • Skerries, Co. Dublin Summercove, Co. Cork
  • Toe Head, Co. Cork
  • Tory Island, Co. Donegal
  • Tramore, Co. Waterford
  • Waterville, Co. Kerry
  • Westport, Co. Mayo
  • Wicklow
  • Youghal, Co. Cork

Sources: Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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