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Displaying items by tag: Royal Cork Yacht Club

Anthony O'Leary's Royal Cork team Yacht Club has moved up to fourth overall after yesterday's heavy weather races on Day 3 of Rolex NYYC Invitational Cup.

O'Leary represented the Royal Cork Yacht Club at the first Invitational Cup in 2009, winning two of the first three races sailed in this event. He's been a fixture ever since, bringing along one or more of his three sons to each edition. For the sixth Rolex New York Yacht Club Invitational Cup, Anthony O'Leary has sons Robert and Nicholas with him and the familial dynamic in heavy air was apparent as they were one of the fastest boats on the water all day.

As Afloat reported yesterday, O'Leary's crew for the Big Apple event is: Cliodhna Connolly, Emma Geary, Sophie Browne, Clive O Shea, Robert O Leary, Nicholas O Leary, Ben Field and Timmy Murphy

"It was very enjoyable, plenty of breeze," said the elder O'Leary. "It was a bit like our season at home: dull, the odd bit of rain and plenty of wind. We had a poor start to the first race because there was a lot going on and we were a bit late to get to the line. We didn’t do too badly overall, we pulled ourselves back very well to get to fifth because I think we were worse than 10th at the top mark. Second race, we had a very good start and things just went right for us. We were able to sail our own race for most of it."

RCYC teamRCYC team in New York includes Cliodhna Connolly, Emma Geary, Sophie Browne, Clive O Shea, Robert O Leary, Nicholas O Leary, Ben Field and Timmy Murphy

On the final run of the day, the Royal Cork team (with team mum Sally O'Leary in red above) put on an impressive display of downwind power, turning a solid lead at the final mark into an overwhelming one by the finish. Unfortunately for the Royal Cork crew, there are no bonus points for the margin of victory in sailing. But the speed the team showed today, says O'Leary, is a good sign for the final two days.

"We’re getting used to the boat a bit more every day," he said. "We’ve sailed similar boats, but we’ve not sailed the 37, other than one day at home. We’re getting the knack of it. There’s plenty of races left in this competition."

The IC37 by Melges sailboat may be new to them, but the breezy and lumpy conditions on Rhode Island Sound for Day 3 of the Rolex New York Yacht Club Invitational Cup were old hat for the teams from Australia's Royal Sydney Yacht Club, Ireland's Royal Cork Yacht Club and the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. Those three teams shined brightest on a gloomy, overcast day that saw many crews struggle to keep their feet and their keels under them. Among those licking their wounds this evening at the mid-regatta Lobster Bake were Day 2 leader San Diego Yacht Club, which blew apart their spinnaker on the first downwind leg of the day's second race and struggled to 16th place without the crucial downwind horsepower. As a result, what was a developing blowout yesterday is now a very competitive regatta. San Diego still leads, but by just four points, while only eight points separates first from fourth.

The Rolex New York Yacht Club Invitational Cup is a biennial regatta hosted by the New York Yacht Club Harbour Court in Newport, R.I. Since the event was first run in 2009, it has attracted top amateur sailors from 43 of the world’s most prestigious yacht clubs from 21 countries. After five editions in the Swan 42 class, the 2019 event will be sailed in the IC37 by Melges, designed by Mark Mills and built by Westerly Marine in Santa Ana, Calif., and FIBRE Mechanics in the United Kingdom. The strict one-design nature of this new, purpose-built class combined with the fact that all 20 boats are owned and maintained by the New York Yacht Club, will ensure a level playing field never before seen in amateur big-boat sailing. The regatta will run through September 14.

Guido Belgiorno-Nettis' team representing the Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron  didn't have an emphatic win today, but the Squadron's 3-2 scoreline won the day and significantly strengthened the team's second-place position in the overall standings. Belgiorno-Nettis finished fourth in his first Invitational Cup in 2015 and second in 2017. His rather average start to this regatta—an 11th and ninth—seemed a bit out of character. Since then it's been nothing but top-three finishes for the Aussie crew, and they can now see a clear path to the first overall victory in the regatta for a Southern Hemisphere club.

"This boat is quite an easy boat to handle in heavy air," said Belgiorno-Nettis. "We're comfortable with that and we just keep fiddling around with what makes the boat go faster. We have a great dynamic between the trimmers, main sheet and even our tactician who is working the runners, just trying to figure out what is the mode that the boat is going to go best in as the breeze builds. And we've just been able to find it. Our scoreline in the last few races in this heavier air indicates we've at least been as fast as the other teams and been able to get around the course."

The third star of the day was the Royal Canadian Yacht Club, a two-time winner of the Rolex New York Yacht Club Invitational Cup, which won the first race by a strong margin. In Race 2, the Canadian crew ground back to fifth after a tangle at the pin end of the starting line left skipper Terry McLaughlin and his team staring at a lot of transoms on the first beat. The Canadians are currently third, four points behind the Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron and one point in front of the team from Royal Cork. Rounding out the top five is Japan Sailing Federation, with 40 points.

Former champion Royal Thames Yacht Club, in sixth with 50.4 points, leads a knot of five teams within five points of one another, each with designs on cracking the top five or even making the podium.

Racing for the 2019 Rolex New York Yacht Club Invitational Cup will continue through Saturday, September 14

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Anthony O'Leary's Ireland team from Royal Cork Yacht Club are up to fifth after a good showing in the second day of the New York Invitational in the new Mark Mills-designed IC 37s.

O'Leary's crew for the Big Apple event are: Cliodhna Connolly, Emma Geary, Sophie Browne, Clive O Shea, Robert O Leary, Nicholas O Leary, Ben Field and Timmy Murphy

It may be a different year, a different boat, but so far it is still the same outstanding performance for San Diego Yacht Club. Through four races in the Cup, the premier Corinthian one-design keelboat championship, the West Coast team has shown the blazing boatspeed, precision teamwork and tactical acumen that qualified them for this prestigious international championship a year ago. With a first, third and first today, San Diego skipper Tyler Sinks has staked his crew to a 17-point lead after just four races. There's a lot of sailing left in this event—up to eight more races over three days—but the early marker by the San Diego Yacht Club (SDYC) has put the rest of the fleet on notice: either find a way to keep Bow No. 7 in the rearview mirror, or start fighting for second place.

RCYC 2

Since the event was first run in 2009, it has attracted top amateur sailors from 43 of the world’s most prestigious yacht clubs from 21 countries. After five editions in the Swan 42 class, the 2019 event will be sailed in the IC37, designed by Mark Mills and built by Westerly Marine in Santa Ana, Calif., and FIBRE Mechanics in the United Kingdom. The strict one-design nature of this new, purpose-built class combined with the fact that all 20 boats are owned and maintained by the New York Yacht Club, will ensure a level playing field never before seen in amateur big-boat sailing. The regatta will run through September 14. 

"We just tried to sail our own boat, keep the boat moving fast," said Sinks of today's sterling performance by the San Diego Yacht Club team. "The team did a great job at minimising mistakes, and our tactician Jake LaDow kept us heading the right direction. The team was sailing really well. It was one of those days we felt the conditions played in our favour; windy, but also very shifty. We just connected the dots and ended up having a really good day."

Thanks to 10 days of practice and racing in the IC37 by Melges over the summer, the San Diego Yacht Club came into the regatta confident in their boat handling and boatspeed, and with a good feel for the local conditions.

"I think when you have speed, you really don’t need to push it," said Sinks. "We feel comfortable starting anywhere on the line so if we have to win a side, we feel good about that. But, in general, we’re just trying to get off the line with speed and have the ability to do what we want."

Three solid, if unremarkable starts today, gave LaDow the ability to play the variable breeze, which he did to perfection.

"It was extremely head out of the boat," says LaDow, who showed wisdom beyond his 26 years during today's sailing. "My head was on a swivel. Also doing runners, I was balancing how much I had to be tuned into the speed versus looking at puff and shift. There were an infinite amount of decisions to be made today with puff and shift on the racecourse, and the current. I was just constantly evaluating other boats, where they’re going fast, where the breeze is and all that."

In the last race, San Diego didn't take over the lead until the final moments of the race.

"That was all Nick Martin, who was trimming the kite and the jib for us all day," said Sinks. "We had a good shift that allowed us to sail up to the top group, and I think we had a couple of better jibes than the other teams. That was really the difference in the end. We were barely able to get across Southern, who was right behind us and got caught up with the other boats, and we were able to shoot out ahead. It’s not how you start the race, it’s how you finish. I think the only point in the race where we were leading was at the very end of the race. So it worked out for us."

While it's hard to find fault in their performance today, LaDow said that legendary sailor Vince Brun, a SDYC member who is serving as the team's coach, won't let them get too cocky.

"Vince has an eye that most people don’t have, and he can always find something we can improve on," said LaDow. "All the teams are good and getting better, so we've got to keep that learning curve steep for us as well. Vince has been a huge part of that, refining our sail shape, crew work on the boat, everything. It’s been huge having his input."

Behind San Diego is a knot of five teams separated by five points. And just 15 points separates 11th from second, where Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron (RSYS) sits after finishing the day with a first and a third.

"It was a really good day," said RSYS skipper Guido Belgiorno-Nettis. "We were very happy with the crew work. We’ve only just stepped onto these boats last week, so we’re still learning. [The IC37 by Melges] is a great boat. Compliments to the New York Yacht Club coming up with this design and commissioning it and doing everything they've done and getting it so even. It really is about crew work and that’s a lot of good fun."

Racing for the 2019 Rolex New York Yacht Club Invitational Cup will continue through Saturday, September 14, with a live broadcast of each race via Facebook and YouTube. Racing is scheduled to start at 11 am each day.

1. San Diego Yacht Club, 2, 1, 3, 1; 7 points; 2. Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron, 11, 9, 1, 3; 24 points; 3. Japan Sailing Federation, 1, 4, 9, 11; 25 points; 4. Royal Canadian Yacht Club, 7, 3, 12, 5; 27 points;. 5. Royal Cork Yacht Club, 6, 6, 14, 2; 28 points; 6. Yacht Club Italiano, 4, 12, 5, 8; 29 points; 7. Yacht Club Costa Smeralda, 3, 7, 13, 9; 32 points; 8. Royal Thames Yacht Club, 5, 5, 6, 19; 35 points; 9. New York Yacht Club, 8, 14, 7, 7; 36 points; 10. Royal Swedish Yacht Club, 9, 2, 8, 18; 37 points; 11. Southern Yacht Club, 14, 19, 2, 4; 39 points; 12. Yacht Club Argentino, 13, 15, 4, 16; 48 points; 13. Royal Hong Kong Yacht Club, 19, 8, 15, 6; 48 points; 14. Itchenor Sailing Club, 16, 13, 10, 10; 49 points; 15. Royal New Zealand Yacht Club, 12, 11, 11, 17; 51 points; 16. Real Club Náutico de Barcelona, 15, 10, 17, 13; 55 points; 17. Norddeutscher Regatta Verein, 10, 18, 18, 15; 61 points; 18. Royal Yacht Squadron, 17, 16, 19, 12; 64 points; 19. Royal Freshwater Bay Yacht Club, 18, 17, 16, 14; 65 points; 20. Yacht Club de France, 20, 20, 20, 20; 80 points.

Full Results here

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Although the New York Yacht Club was founded as “recently” as 1844, it’s regarded in the senior yacht club in the USA, as is the Royal Cork in Ireland - and the world too, come to that, with the RCYC’s unrivalled foundation in 1720 writes W M Nixon. But in England things aren’t so simple (as we’ve been learning only too well during the past three years), for although the Royal Thames in London dates back to 1775, it’s regarded as the senior club, while the ever-so-grand Royal Yacht Squadron in Cowes – not founded until 1815 – is regarded as the premier club.

Be that as it may, when the New York YC set up its International Invitational Series for amateur crews six years ago, it cast around to make it truly international and simply went straight to the senior clubs in each country for the crew selection, though the lineup would suggest there’s some flexibility in the final assembly.

rcyc invite2In recent years, the NYYC Invitational Series used Club Swan 42s
The outcome is that today in Newport Rhode Island there are 20 crews from almost every continent taking to the water off the NYYC’s rather splendid out-station of Harbour Court. And after some years of racing in the relative comfort of Club Swan 42s, for the first time they’re going to be sailing the new Melges IC37, pretty much an out-and-out raceboat designed by Mark Mills of Wicklow, and now well into a building programme with Westerly Marine in California, and FIBRE Mechanics in the UK.

rcyc invite3Anothny O’Leary was already one of Ireland’s top sailors when he became one of the youngest-ever Admirals of the Royal Cork in 2000, but since then he has continued to notch many successes afloat, including captaining two International Commodore’s Cup team wins

The Royal Cork’s crew will be headed by Anthony O’Leary, who became the one of the youngest-ever RCYC Admirals back in 2000, but has put in much prodigious sailing achievement ever since. Although he’s best known these days for 1720 campaigning – both in the straight class and with the “cruiserfied” version Antix Bheag for IRC racing – he has cut the mustard internationally with major success in larger craft.

So who knows, but maybe the next five days of top end international Corinthian sport off Newport might be one of the first steps towards getting an IC37 class off the ground at Crosshaven, although we’d expect advocates of that notion to have been busy already.

rcyc invite4The O’Leary-led RCYC crew in mid-gybe during 2018’s NYYC series with a satisfactory number of renowned international clubs tucked in astern

Published in Royal Cork YC
30th August 2019

Douglas Deane 1937-2019

The world of sailing in Ireland and internationally is much diminished by the sad passing of Douglas “Dougie” Deane of Crosshaven at the age of 82, after a very fully-lived life in which he contributed much to the sports with which he was involved, both in personal involvement and in several administrative roles, while at the same time being a life-enhancing and active member of the larger Crosshaven community in which he and his wife Liz had an extraordinarily generous family role.

Dougie Deane was the embodiment of all that is best in Cork life. He was excellent company with an infectious enjoyment of the moment, he was an able performer both as an individual and team player, and he quietly did much good work as he progressed through life.

Like many of his friends and family, he was deeply into sailing and rugby. His father Harry was Vice-Admiral of the Royal Cork Yacht Club from 1973 to 1975, and President of the legendary Cork Constitution Rugby Club, so-called because it was founded by staff members of the now long-defunct Cork newspaper of that name. But while Dougie was sufficiently involved with rugby to become a founder and later President of Crosshaven Rugby Club in which all of his five sons played, sailing was his special passion.

dusk 1960 cork harbour2Dougie Deane crewed by Donal McClement racing Dusk in Cork Harbour in 1960

He became a junior member of the Royal Munster YC in Crosshaven in 1952, racing the IDRA 14 Maybe with Donal McClement, who was one of his many good friends - in Donal’s case, it was a lifelong camaraderie. They soon realised that while the O’Brien Kennedy-designed IDRA 14s were theoretically one-design, some boats were undoubtedly “more one-design than others”, and when they managed to move on from the appropriately-named Maybe to the legendary Dusk, major prizes started coming their way, with the prestigious Dognose Trophy being taken by the pair in 1959.

sam thompson etc3 Leading Crosshaven sailors Sam Thompson (left) and Charlie Dwyer, with the new winners of the Dognose Trophy in 1959, Douglas Deane and Donal McClement (right)idra14 dusk4Dusk as she is today, restored in a WEST project by the father-and-son team of Tom and David O’Brien, and being raced here by Andy Sargent in the 2016 IDRA 14 70th Anniversary Race at Clontarf, when she finished second. Photo: W M Nixon
But the young Dougie’s talents had already been well-recognised as early as 1955 when, with George Henry, he formed part of the Ireland team in the International Junior Regatta at Dun Laoghaire, a pioneering effort at a time when junior sailing as a category on its own was only beginning to be developed in Ireland.

henry deane5Dougie Deane (right) with George Henry of Dun Laoghaire preparing to race in Mermaids at the International Junior Regatta in Dun Laoghaire in 1955.
dougie deane 1964 baltimore6Press cutting from Baltimore in 1964 – it took the Cork Examiner a day or two to recover from that spelling of Dinghy Week……  
His dinghy interests went on to take in busy campaigns as an owner with an International 505 and a National 18. But in classic Crosshaven style, his sailing abilities were readily transferred to cruising and offshore racing, and in 1965 he became a member of the Irish Cruising Club mainly on the strength of a voyage to Spain with Stan Roche, Joe Fitzgerald and Charlie Howlett on Stan Roche’s characterful 29-ton ketch Nancy Bet.

nancy bet7Stan Roche’s 29-ton ketch Nancy Bet, in which the young Dougie Deane cruised to Spain
deane fitzgerald roche8Offshore sailing, with any hardship minimized by appropriate medication…(left to right) Dougie Deane with Charlie Howlett almost invisible behind him, Joe Fitzgerald and Stan Roche at sea on board the latter’s Nancy Bet.
In the work side of life, he had started early with what was to become Irish Distillers in their Cork administrative centre, where he went on to become Manager, and those managerial and administrative skills were quickly recognized in the sailing world, where he was a youthful member of the Royal Munster committee, rising to become Rear Commodore in 1965.

Then when the Royal Munster and the Royal Cork amalgamated in 1966-67 to become the Royal Cork Yacht Club in time for the Quarter Millennium in 1970, he was on the new RCYC General Committee when it first met in March 1967.

Thus he was to play a key role in the complex yet very successful Quarter Millennial Celebrations of 1969-70, and was much looked up to, as one who had actively been there for the Quarter Millennium, in order to give highly-valued advice for the up-coming Royal Cork Tricentenary next year. When his final illness struck with extreme rapidity, this made his sudden loss particularly painful in Crosshaven, where his eldest son Gavin is CEO of the Royal Cork YC, and had already been drawing on his helpful father’s exceptional experience in planning the very special year ahead.

For Douglas Deane - in addition to his many other attributes - was a wonderful father and family man. He married Liz Lucey in 1972 with Brian Cudmore as his Best Man in a perfect example of the inter-linking of Cork sailing families - when Brian in turn went on to marry Eleanor, Douglas was their Best Man.

liz dougie deane9A wonderful couple – a recent photo of Liz and Dougie Deane
Douglas and Liz went on to have five sons and a daughter Lucy, Crosshaven youngsters through and through, yet with a much larger breadth of vision than their strong sense of belonging to one locality might suggest.

And there was generosity and love too – when Lucy was 16 and their family virtually raised, Dougie and Liz were faced with the sudden death of Liz’s sister who left two sons younger than Lucy - Andrew and James. They were simply taken into the generous Deane household in Crosshaven, and in the end Dougie and Liz raised a family of eight.

They were a wonderful pair together, yet Dougie was able to continue his sailing, going into cruiser-racer ownership for a while with a share in the 37ft Dalcassian, and then being a regular member of the O’Leary crew on several boats with the family name of Irish Mist, particularly the two Tonner Irish Mist III which, under a subsequent owner, was seriously damaged on a stranding in the entrance to Cork Harbour after a steering failure. When she was beautifully restored by Jim McCarthy, Dougie transferred to the McCarthy crew, and stayed with him when he sought a new direction with an X99.

When the new 26ft 1720 Cork Sportsboat concept to a design by Tony Castro was being developed in time for the 1994 season, Dougie Deane was an enthusiastic supporter, so much so that he was able to persuade his directors in Cork Gin to back him in buying 1720 Sportsboat Hull No 1, which very conspicuously became Cork Dry Gin, for this was a quarter of a century ago, and such advertising seemed the most natural thing in the world.

Today, Gavin Deane vividly remembers his first sail with his father in this new boat. While his father was not particularly athletic in appearance, like Dennis Conner he became something different at the helm of a sailing boat, particularly one with a performance edge. All his experience with IDRA 14s, the 505, and the National 18 came to the fore, and the new sports machine zapped across Cork Harbour at a prodigious speed with Dougie Deane serenely at the helm and everything under control.

cork dry gin10Pioneering in 1994. The new Cork 1720 Sportsboat Cork Dry Gin – No 1 out of the hull mould – at smooth speed in Cork Harbour with Dougie Deane at the helm. He liked all his boats, but this was a special favourite.

It was a metaphor for the way he lived his life. Donal McClement says of him: “He was a gentleman in every possible sense of the word. Quiet spoken yet effective in communication, and very highly-respected and well-liked by all who knew him. And they were many”.

For the last ten years of his life, Dougie owned a Sea Ray 22 fast power-cruiser, built in Cork, capable of 20-25 knots, with a couple of bunks in a little cabin should the urge come on him for a night or two of convenient cruising, and handy for viewing the occasional race. But sailing continued to be his favourite way of being afloat, and he was day sailing with friends and family well into the summer of 2019.

Then there was a family holiday in the south of France, where at the age of 82 he was seen diving with enthusiasm into the blue Mediterranean, to the amazement of his grandchildren. On returning home, his illness quickly manifested itself, and for his friends, he was gone in five weeks. It was a shock, a great sadness, but with the healing help of time, we can see that here was a truly great man who led an exemplary life.

Our heartfelt condolences are with his extensive family and his many close friends.

WMN

Published in Royal Cork YC

Ronan and John Downing's Half Tonner Miss Whiplash was the winner of the IRC Spinnaker Division of Royal Cork Yacht Club's 'At Home' Regatta on Sunday writes Bob Bateman.

The two-day event featured light winds on both days. Keelboats had two races on Saturday and one on Sunday. The National 18s, Mixed Dinghies, Lasers, Toppers and Optimists all raced on the Curlane Bank.

In the White Sail IRC division, Ria Lyden's X332 Ellida was declared the overall winner in the 11-boat fleet.

Full results in all divisions are here

 DSC9512Former Admiral’s attended for the RCYC 'At Home' Boules match. (from left to right) John Roche, Michael McCarthy, Bill Walsh, Current Admiral Pat Farnan, David O’Brien, Paddy Mc Glade, Barry Rose, Bill O’Mahony, Tony O’Connor and Ted Crosbie. (Hugh Mockler was also present but absent due to RNLI shout).

 DSC9638Mike McCarthy Winner IHS receives the trophy from Admiral Pat Farnan

George RadleyGeorge Radley, Winner, Club Echo Spinnaker Division

 DSC9696The Downing Family, Miss Whiplash, overall winner of IRC overall IRC division

 DSC9693Mary Jones, Jelly Baby, second overall in the IRC Spinnaker Division

 DSC9707Ria Lyden and crew Winner of both IRC and Echo Divisions

Ewan BarryEwan Barry winner of Saturday's National 18’s race

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Published in Royal Cork YC
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It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Douglas Deane of Crosshaven, for many years one of Cork Harbour’s best-known sailing figures afloat and ashore.

His funeral will take place tomorrow (Tuesday) at 11.30am in St Brigid’s Church, Crosshaven.

Afloat will publish a full appreciation of Dougie Deane in due course, meanwhile, our thoughts are with his family and many friends, and particularly with his son Gavin, CEO of the Royal Cork YC

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Claiming to be the 'largest stand-alone dinghy festival event in the country', the official launch of Cork Dinghy Fest took place in the Royal Cork Yacht Club last week.

Royal Cork Yacht Club Rear Admiral Brian Jones was joined by volunteers and sailors as they marked the announcement of the continued sponsorship and support from CH Marine and the Port of Cork for the popular biennial event.

As Afloat reported previously, Event chairman Alex Barry is looking forward to another great event and was very excited to announce that DinghyFest ’19 will play host to three national championships, four Southern Championships and even a world championships.

2019 is gearing up to be a great event, according to Barry, who says it was great to have such support from our sponsors this year. Barry is a strong advocate for dinghy sailing of any type, recently moving to a GP14 in advance of the Worlds in Skerries in 2020.

This year’s event will see boats of all shapes and sizes race over the two days with National Championships for Multihulls, National 18’s and RS Fevas, Southern Championships for RS 200s, 400s, 29ers and Mirrors and a world championships for the clinker-built Rankins of Cork Harbour. Strangely enough, the international entries have been slow to date for the Rankin, says Barry, but he’s holding out hope.

The event will take place on September 14th and 15th in the Royal Cork Yacht Club with entry and NOR available on the website here

Published in Royal Cork YC

There were jubilant scenes at Royal Cork Yacht Club on Sunday evening when Paul Smith, President of the Mermaid Sailing Association presented the Foynes Yacht Club triplets Darragh, Noel and Mark McCormack with the National Championship trophy writes Bob Bateman.

The trio successfully defended their title on the last day of the Championships coming from third overall with two races left to sail in the ten race series, as Afloat reported here.

It was the first time the Mermaid Class has raced for National Honours in Cork Harbour.

Oisin Finucane Chris McDaid Sean FinucaneThe Under 25 winners trophy was presented by Patrick Finucane to Oisin Finucane, Chris McDaid and Sean Finucane. They were also winners of the Designer Trophy (below) for the biggest improvement in the fleet

 DSC8682

 DSC8691Daphne Trophy Winner (Jill134) Roisin McCormack presents to Paul Smith and crew Anne Smith and Pat Mangan

See all Bob Bateman's reports and photos on the 2019 Mermaid Championships in one handy link here

The Championship prizegiving in the RCYC dining room also included day prize presentations by RCYC Rear Admiral Dinghies, Brian Jones and MSA President Paul Smith. See selection of photos below

Mermaid Prizes Royal Cork1MSA President Paul Smith...

Mermaid Prizes Royal Cork1...with Race Officer Scorie Walls

Mermaid Prizes Royal Cork1RCYC Rear Admiral Dinghies, Brian Jones addresses the Mermaid fleet

Mermaid Prizes Royal Cork1Mermaid Prizes Royal Cork1Mermaid Prizes Royal Cork1Mermaid Prizes Royal Cork1Mermaid Prizes Royal Cork1Mermaid Prizes Royal Cork1

Published in Mermaid

For the first time, The DBSC Mermaids are holding their annual Championship in Crosshaven over 4 days from 1st - 4th August hosted by the Royal Cork Yacht Club. The fleet has enjoyed numbers in excess of 25 to 30 boats at its most recent championships but this year’s event is shaping up to be something special with a fistful of former champions deciding to rejoin the fray and relive old memories and try to put the current crop of recent younger winners under a little pressure.

Current form would have to recognise Daragh Mc Cormack, last year’s champion on home waters, in his exceptional boat Innocence no 188, as the firm favourite. He won the Munster’s earlier this year and dominated the Skerries regatta last weekend. In the hands his club mate Vincent Mc Cormack Innocence was also a clear winner in a competitive fleet at the Leinster’s during the Volvo Regatta earlier this month.

Innocence MermaidMermaid National Champions 188 – Innocence helmed by Darragh McCormack and crew Mark McCormack and Johnny Dillon Photo: Ted Kelly

Regular winner Jonathan O'Rourke in Tiller Girl 77 will be certain to be in the hunt as will Mark Boylan, the youngest ever winner a few years ago in a very windy Galway Bay.

Sam Shields, twice winner, has bought the famous Helen 76 and completely rebuilt her and would have high expectations of being in the frame with his experienced crew.

Also returning is the noted Rush sailor Paddy Dillon, another former winner, in Wild Wind 131 who will be anxious to build on his experience with the outstandingly successful J 109 Storm Team over the last couple of years. A solid 2nd in Skerries as his first outing in years consolidates his credentials for consideration as a serious contender.

Mermaid Clinker 100 and 119 2Mermaid racing comes to Cork Harbour in August Photo: Afloat

Long-time Mermaid stalwart, Derek Joyce has refurbished his unbeatable steed from the 2000s, Zeila 187 and he will be attempting to match Roger Bannon’s record of six wins over the years. It is also expected that Roger Bannon might be there with rumours circulating that Kate Grimes is returning from Dubai especially for the event to crew for him.

News is also circulating of several rebuilding projects around the country with the hope that some may make it to the starting line in Crosshaven, including Nichapando 114 and Perhaps 111.

Exciting times for this iconic class!

Published in Mermaid

In the first race of the Ronan Enright Solicitors July League at Royal Cork Yacht Club last night, Ronan and John Downing's Half Tonner Miss Whiplash was the winner of the 19-boat IRC Spinnaker division writes Bob Bateman.

It was a light wind race with the breeze from a Westerly direction in Cork Harbour. From a Committee Boat start, the fleet sailed to Cage then to Corkbeg, with a beat to 8, a run to 7 and a beat again to 10.

Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League Committee Boat Photo: Bob Bateman

Second overall was the Bolero Bandit with the Jones Family J109, Jelly Baby third. Results are here.

Royal Cork July Sailing League1The Half Tonner Miss Whiplash was the winner of the first race of the Royal Cork July Sailing League Photo: Bob Bateman

Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1Royal Cork July Sailing League1

Published in Royal Cork YC
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Page 10 of 46

The Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard is Ireland's fourth 'Blue Light' service (along with An Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service). It provides a nationwide maritime emergency organisation as well as a variety of services to shipping and other government agencies.

The purpose of the Irish Coast Guard is to promote safety and security standards, and by doing so, prevent as far as possible, the loss of life at sea, and on inland waters, mountains and caves, and to provide effective emergency response services and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The Irish Coast Guard has responsibility for Ireland's system of marine communications, surveillance and emergency management in Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and certain inland waterways.

It is responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue and counter-pollution and ship casualty operations. It also has responsibility for vessel traffic monitoring.

Operations in respect of maritime security, illegal drug trafficking, illegal migration and fisheries enforcement are co-ordinated by other bodies within the Irish Government.

On average, each year, the Irish Coast Guard is expected to:

  • handle 3,000 marine emergencies
  • assist 4,500 people and save about 200 lives
  • task Coast Guard helicopters on missions

The Coast Guard has been around in some form in Ireland since 1908.

Coast Guard helicopters

The Irish Coast Guard has contracted five medium-lift Sikorsky Search and Rescue helicopters deployed at bases in Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo.

The helicopters are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours and 45 minutes at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice based at Waterford.

These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties).

They can also be used for assistance in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations as authorised by the Coast Guard within appropriate regulations.

Irish Coastguard FAQs

The Irish Coast Guard provides nationwide maritime emergency response, while also promoting safety and security standards. It aims to prevent the loss of life at sea, on inland waters, on mountains and in caves; and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The main role of the Irish Coast Guard is to rescue people from danger at sea or on land, to organise immediate medical transport and to assist boats and ships within the country's jurisdiction. It has three marine rescue centres in Dublin, Malin Head, Co Donegal, and Valentia Island, Co Kerry. The Dublin National Maritime Operations centre provides marine search and rescue responses and coordinates the response to marine casualty incidents with the Irish exclusive economic zone (EEZ).

Yes, effectively, it is the fourth "blue light" service. The Marine Rescue Sub-Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for the coastal area between Ballycotton, Co Cork and Clifden, Co Galway. At the same time, the MRSC Malin Head covers the area between Clifden and Lough Foyle. Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC) Dublin covers Carlingford Lough, Co Louth to Ballycotton, Co Cork. Each MRCC/MRSC also broadcasts maritime safety information on VHF and MF radio, including navigational and gale warnings, shipping forecasts, local inshore forecasts, strong wind warnings and small craft warnings.

The Irish Coast Guard handles about 3,000 marine emergencies annually, and assists 4,500 people - saving an estimated 200 lives, according to the Department of Transport. In 2016, Irish Coast Guard helicopters completed 1,000 missions in a single year for the first time.

Yes, Irish Coast Guard helicopters evacuate medical patients from offshore islands to hospital on average about 100 times a year. In September 2017, the Department of Health announced that search and rescue pilots who work 24-hour duties would not be expected to perform any inter-hospital patient transfers. The Air Corps flies the Emergency Aeromedical Service, established in 2012 and using an AW139 twin-engine helicopter. Known by its call sign "Air Corps 112", it airlifted its 3,000th patient in autumn 2020.

The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the British Maritime and Coastguard Agency, which is responsible for the Northern Irish coast.

The Irish Coast Guard is a State-funded service, with both paid management personnel and volunteers, and is under the auspices of the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport. It is allocated approximately 74 million euro annually in funding, some 85 per cent of which pays for a helicopter contract that costs 60 million euro annually. The overall funding figure is "variable", an Oireachtas committee was told in 2019. Other significant expenditure items include volunteer training exercises, equipment, maintenance, renewal, and information technology.

The Irish Coast Guard has four search and rescue helicopter bases at Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo, run on a contract worth 50 million euro annually with an additional 10 million euro in costs by CHC Ireland. It provides five medium-lift Sikorsky S-92 helicopters and trained crew. The 44 Irish Coast Guard coastal units with 1,000 volunteers are classed as onshore search units, with 23 of the 44 units having rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) and 17 units having cliff rescue capability. The Irish Coast Guard has 60 buildings in total around the coast, and units have search vehicles fitted with blue lights, all-terrain vehicles or quads, first aid equipment, generators and area lighting, search equipment, marine radios, pyrotechnics and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Community Rescue Boats Ireland also provide lifeboats and crews to assist in search and rescue. The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the Garda Siochána, National Ambulance Service, Naval Service and Air Corps, Civil Defence, while fishing vessels, ships and other craft at sea offer assistance in search operations.

The helicopters are designated as airborne from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours, and 45 minutes at night. The aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, on inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains and cover the 32 counties. They can also assist in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and can transport offshore firefighters and ambulance teams. The Irish Coast Guard volunteers units are expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time of departing from the station house in ten minutes from notification during daylight and 20 minutes at night. They are also expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time to the scene of the incident in less than 60 minutes from notification by day and 75 minutes at night, subject to geographical limitations.

Units are managed by an officer-in-charge (three stripes on the uniform) and a deputy officer in charge (two stripes). Each team is trained in search skills, first aid, setting up helicopter landing sites and a range of maritime skills, while certain units are also trained in cliff rescue.

Volunteers receive an allowance for time spent on exercises and call-outs. What is the difference between the Irish Coast Guard and the RNLI? The RNLI is a registered charity which has been saving lives at sea since 1824, and runs a 24/7 volunteer lifeboat service around the British and Irish coasts. It is a declared asset of the British Maritime and Coast Guard Agency and the Irish Coast Guard. Community Rescue Boats Ireland is a community rescue network of volunteers under the auspices of Water Safety Ireland.

No, it does not charge for rescue and nor do the RNLI or Community Rescue Boats Ireland.

The marine rescue centres maintain 19 VHF voice and DSC radio sites around the Irish coastline and a digital paging system. There are two VHF repeater test sites, four MF radio sites and two NAVTEX transmitter sites. Does Ireland have a national search and rescue plan? The first national search and rescue plan was published in July, 2019. It establishes the national framework for the overall development, deployment and improvement of search and rescue services within the Irish Search and Rescue Region and to meet domestic and international commitments. The purpose of the national search and rescue plan is to promote a planned and nationally coordinated search and rescue response to persons in distress at sea, in the air or on land.

Yes, the Irish Coast Guard is responsible for responding to spills of oil and other hazardous substances with the Irish pollution responsibility zone, along with providing an effective response to marine casualties and monitoring or intervening in marine salvage operations. It provides and maintains a 24-hour marine pollution notification at the three marine rescue centres. It coordinates exercises and tests of national and local pollution response plans.

The first Irish Coast Guard volunteer to die on duty was Caitriona Lucas, a highly trained member of the Doolin Coast Guard unit, while assisting in a search for a missing man by the Kilkee unit in September 2016. Six months later, four Irish Coast Guard helicopter crew – Dara Fitzpatrick, Mark Duffy, Paul Ormsby and Ciarán Smith -died when their Sikorsky S-92 struck Blackrock island off the Mayo coast on March 14, 2017. The Dublin-based Rescue 116 crew were providing "top cover" or communications for a medical emergency off the west coast and had been approaching Blacksod to refuel. Up until the five fatalities, the Irish Coast Guard recorded that more than a million "man hours" had been spent on more than 30,000 rescue missions since 1991.

Several investigations were initiated into each incident. The Marine Casualty Investigation Board was critical of the Irish Coast Guard in its final report into the death of Caitriona Lucas, while a separate Health and Safety Authority investigation has been completed, but not published. The Air Accident Investigation Unit final report into the Rescue 116 helicopter crash has not yet been published.

The Irish Coast Guard in its present form dates back to 1991, when the Irish Marine Emergency Service was formed after a campaign initiated by Dr Joan McGinley to improve air/sea rescue services on the west Irish coast. Before Irish independence, the British Admiralty was responsible for a Coast Guard (formerly the Water Guard or Preventative Boat Service) dating back to 1809. The West Coast Search and Rescue Action Committee was initiated with a public meeting in Killybegs, Co Donegal, in 1988 and the group was so effective that a Government report was commissioned, which recommended setting up a new division of the Department of the Marine to run the Marine Rescue Co-Ordination Centre (MRCC), then based at Shannon, along with the existing coast radio service, and coast and cliff rescue. A medium-range helicopter base was established at Shannon within two years. Initially, the base was served by the Air Corps.

The first director of what was then IMES was Capt Liam Kirwan, who had spent 20 years at sea and latterly worked with the Marine Survey Office. Capt Kirwan transformed a poorly funded voluntary coast and cliff rescue service into a trained network of cliff and sea rescue units – largely voluntary, but with paid management. The MRCC was relocated from Shannon to an IMES headquarters at the then Department of the Marine (now Department of Transport) in Leeson Lane, Dublin. The coast radio stations at Valentia, Co Kerry, and Malin Head, Co Donegal, became marine rescue-sub-centres.

The current director is Chris Reynolds, who has been in place since August 2007 and was formerly with the Naval Service. He has been seconded to the head of mission with the EUCAP Somalia - which has a mandate to enhance Somalia's maritime civilian law enforcement capacity – since January 2019.

  • Achill, Co. Mayo
  • Ardmore, Co. Waterford
  • Arklow, Co. Wicklow
  • Ballybunion, Co. Kerry
  • Ballycotton, Co. Cork
  • Ballyglass, Co. Mayo
  • Bonmahon, Co. Waterford
  • Bunbeg, Co. Donegal
  • Carnsore, Co. Wexford
  • Castlefreake, Co. Cork
  • Castletownbere, Co. Cork
  • Cleggan, Co. Galway
  • Clogherhead, Co. Louth
  • Costelloe Bay, Co. Galway
  • Courtown, Co. Wexford
  • Crosshaven, Co. Cork
  • Curracloe, Co. Wexford
  • Dingle, Co. Kerry
  • Doolin, Co. Clare
  • Drogheda, Co. Louth
  • Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
  • Dunmore East, Co. Waterford
  • Fethard, Co. Wexford
  • Glandore, Co. Cork
  • Glenderry, Co. Kerry
  • Goleen, Co. Cork
  • Greencastle, Co. Donegal
  • Greenore, Co. Louth
  • Greystones, Co. Wicklow
  • Guileen, Co. Cork
  • Howth, Co. Dublin
  • Kilkee, Co. Clare
  • Killala, Co. Mayo
  • Killybegs, Co. Donegal
  • Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
  • Knightstown, Co. Kerry
  • Mulroy, Co. Donegal
  • North Aran, Co. Galway
  • Old Head Of Kinsale, Co. Cork
  • Oysterhaven, Co. Cork
  • Rosslare, Co. Wexford
  • Seven Heads, Co. Cork
  • Skerries, Co. Dublin Summercove, Co. Cork
  • Toe Head, Co. Cork
  • Tory Island, Co. Donegal
  • Tramore, Co. Waterford
  • Waterville, Co. Kerry
  • Westport, Co. Mayo
  • Wicklow
  • Youghal, Co. Cork

Sources: Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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