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Displaying items by tag: Surfing

#StormDesmond - With many parts of the country still recovering from the effects of Storm Desmond earlier this month – and Galway in particular facing a €12 million clean-up bill – it might be surprising to learn that some people turned the conditions to their advantage.

But that's exactly what a group of intrepid kayakers did in Ennistymon, Co Clare, as the floodwaters turned part of the Cullenagh River into raging rapids – and local TD Timmy Dooley happened to be there to record it all on video, as the Belfast Telegraph reports.

Elsewhere, Northern Irish big wave surfer Al Mennie wasn't about to pass up the opportunity to paddle out to the 20-foot swells generated by the storm, captured in all their glory in a photo gallery on Uproxx.

Published in Kayaking

#Surfing - An Irish wave enthusiast's 'surfing' video on the streets of Manchester has gone viral.

As the Belfast Telegraph reports, Manchester University student Sean-Caio Dos Santos Corr from Derrylaughan made the clip for the craic after spotting traffic splashing barrel waves onto the pavement on a flooded street.

Waiting for another downpour, Corr and his friend Christian Berger pounced with surfboard, camera and Bermuda shorts at the ready – and the results caught the interest of online viewers across Europe.

"We didn't even intend to take a camera with us we just grabbed it on the way out of the house for a laugh," says Corr.

"And now it's quite funny that people are actually interested in seeing eejits on the side of the road getting splashed in the face by a puddle."

In other surfing news, one of Cornwall's most prominent big-wave surfers has set up shop on Ireland's Wild Atlantic Way to be in prime position for the giant walls of water the current stormy season is bound to throw up.

Tom Lowe tells the Western Morning News how chasing the biggest and best waves for a living often means sleeping on friends' floors – and jetting around the world at a moment's notice - while keeping in peak physical and mental condition

“It’s a complete package," he says. "Your heart has to be in it, your mind has to be in it and you have to be physically stable.”

Published in Surfing
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#Surfing - The history of big wave riding at Mullaghmore is the focus of the latest episode of Threading Edges, the new surfing video series from EPIC TV.

As championed by JOE.ie, last week's first episode introduced a number of regular visitors to the Sligo monster describe what makes the swell so special.

But the second part delves more into the relatively recent history of the must-surf destination for the world's most extreme surfers – and one that's helped put Ireland squarely on the world surfing map.

Published in Surfing
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#Surfing - One of big wave surfing's best kept secrets off the Clare coast has seen the area named among the top surf spots in the UK and Ireland, as the Clare Herald reports.

Easkey in Co Sligo and The Peak in Bundoran, Co Donegal also made the grade alongside Aileens, a renowned offshore swell only accessible to those in the know, in the list put together by Surfholidays.com.

The Clare Herald has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing
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#Surfing - Only two surfers retained their titles at a delayed Irish Nationals that saw 13 new champions crowned in Bundoran last weekend, as the Irish Examiner reports.

Marginal surf was forecast for the third of three possible windows for the competition, and indeed the contest director stepped in to move the action to Tullan Strand due to inconsistent waves at The Peak early on Saturday 10 October.

It proved a change for the better, providing "tightly fought" surfing action in the men's final especially, as Sligo's Geared McDaid clinched the title from defending champ Stephen Kilfeather.

The women's division also celebrated a new champion in Sophie Pigot of Lahinch's West Coast Surf Club.

The Irish Examiner has much more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - A new surfing exchange programme for young people is promoting cultural relations between the UK and Ireland.

As the Cornish Guardian reports, up to 15 local teenagers will be selected to take part in the Wave Project exchange with Co Donegal, which has the aim of boosting confidence and reducing anxiety through surfing.

The first exchange takes place over next month's half-term holidays in the UK, when 13 Irish youth will stay in Newquay.

They will return the favour next spring over the Easter break when the Cornish teens will stay at a purpose-built facility on the Donegal coast.

The Cornish Guardian has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - Summer might already be a distant memory, but Ireland's surfing season is only just getting under way.

And beyond the bigger wave hotspots like Sligo, which is set to host record-breaker Garrett McNamara at the second Surf Summit this November, there's a wealth of activity happening all around the Irish coast.

Entertainment.ie brings us a round-up of some of the best places for surfing action for all ability levels, including perhaps lesser-known haunts like the Sunny South East.

But the biggest attraction this month is surely the Battle for the Lake kitesurfing festival on Achill Island next weekend (25-27 September), with its entertaining mix of live music from up-and-coming homegrown acts and dazzling displays by Ireland's top kitesurfers.

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - Strandhill in Co Sligo is the number one spot for surfing in Ireland, according to a new celebration of the best towns to catch waves along the Wild Atlantic Way.

In the words of SurfHolidays.com, the small village just six kilometres from Sligo town "is an eclectic mix of surfers, locals and travellers who have now made [it] their home. If you’re looking for a surf trip in Ireland you have found the perfect spot."

It also helps that it's not far from the northwest surfing mecca of Bundoran – which features third on this selection – not to mention the fearsome big waves off Mullaghmore Head.

Running a close second on the list is Lahinch in Co Clare, which splits the difference between the challenging Aileens big wave spot off the coast to the surf at the beach itself, which is "perfect for beginners".

Further north, just to the east of the Wild Atlantic Way's starting point, the quality surfing at Portrush gets a shout-out, as does the "mythical" wave of Inch reef near Ballybunion in Co Clare.

SurfHolidays.com has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing
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#StandUpPaddle - Jason Conniry is set to make it a first for Cork's An Rás Mór during the Ocean to City Cork Harbour Festival this coming June bank holiday weekend - plying the long-distance rowing course by stand-up paddle board.

As the Irish Examiner reports, the former US lifeguard and longtime surfer, who now resides in Clonakilty, will attempt the shorter 13km race route on his 14ft paddle board just months after surgery for cancer.

He'll be the only 'stand-up guy' among hundreds of rowing boats, kayaks, canoes and even dragon boat teams in the annual race that stretched from Monkstown to the heart of the city in its full 28km length.

“If this goes well, next year I would love to open the race up to prone paddle boarders and we could see up to 100 entries," he said.

The Irish Examiner has more on the story HERE – and also carries news of an incredible encounter with a killer whale by a stand-up paddle boarder in New Zealand this week.

Like Reilly was lucky enough to have his GoPro to hand when the inquisitive orca swam right up to his board for a nose around.

"This one bee-lined it for me," he said of the cetacean in the video above. "He popped up about 10cm away from the back of my board. I was a bit nervous thinking, 'what's this guy going to do?'"

Published in Surfing

#Surfing - Two enterprising surfing brothers are one step closer to a £50,000 business grant from Virgin boss Richard Branson.

According to the Belfast Telegraph, Ricky and Chris Martin secured enough votes through the online 'Pitch to Rich' campaign to come first out of 897 businesses in the initial round.

And if they make it through to the final, they could present their Skunk Works Surfboards company to Branson himself, with the chance to persuade him to back their idea.

The Portrush brothers were profiled earlier this year for making the most of Ireland's growing thirst for surfing with their key concept - a custom method for manufacturing much more durable foam surfboards, or 'foamies'.

Already the duo have a manufacturing set-up in place and orders for 200 boards on the books.

But Ricky Martin, who also owns the Alive Surf School in Portrush, says pitching to Branson "could ultimately change how we do things".

The Belfast Telegraph has more on the story HERE.

Published in Surfing
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Page 4 of 24

Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard is Ireland's 4th Blue Light service (along with An Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service). It provides a nationwide maritime emergency organisation as well as a variety of services to shipping and other government agencies.

The purpose of the Irish Coast Guard is to promote safety and security standards, and by doing so, prevent as far as possible, the loss of life at sea, and on inland waters, mountains and caves, and to provide effective emergency response services and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The Irish Coast Guard has responsibility for Ireland's system of marine communications, surveillance and emergency management in Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and certain inland waterways.

It is responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue and counter-pollution and ship casualty operations. It also has responsibility for vessel traffic monitoring.

Operations in respect of maritime security, illegal drug trafficking, illegal migration and fisheries enforcement are co-ordinated by other bodies within the Irish Government.

Introduction

On average, each year, the Irish Coast Guard is expected to:

  • handle 3,000 marine emergencies
  • assist 4,500 people and save about 200 lives
  • task Coast Guard helicopters on missions around 2000 times (40 times to assist mountain rescues and 200 times to carry out aeromedical HEMS missions on behalf of the HSE), Coast Guard volunteer units will respond 1000 times and RNLI and community lifeboats will be tasked by our Coordination Centres about 950 times
  • evacuate medical patients off our Islands to hospital on 100 occasions
  • assist other nations' Coast Guards about 200 times
  • make around 6,000 maritime safety broadcasts to shipping, fishing and leisure craft users
  • carry out a safety on the water campaign that targets primary schools and leisure craft users, including at sea and beach patrols
  • investigate approximately 50 maritime pollution reports

The Coast Guard has been around in some form in Ireland since 1908.

List of Coast Guard Units in Ireland

  • Achill, Co. Mayo
  • Ardmore, Co. Waterford
  • Arklow, Co. Wicklow
  • Ballybunion, Co. Kerry
  • Ballycotton, Co. Cork
  • Ballyglass, Co. Mayo
  • Bonmahon, Co. Waterford
  • Bunbeg, Co. Donegal
  • Carnsore, Co. Wexford
  • Castlefreake, Co. Cork
  • Castletownbere, Co. Cork
  • Cleggan, Co. Galway
  • Clogherhead, Co. Louth
  • Costelloe Bay, Co. Galway
  • Courtown, Co. Wexford
  • Crosshaven, Co. Cork
  • Curracloe, Co. Wexford
  • Dingle, Co. Kerry
  • Doolin, Co. Clare
  • Drogheda, Co. Louth
  • Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
  • Dunmore East, Co. Waterford
  • Fethard, Co. Wexford
  • Glandore, Co. Cork
  • Glenderry, Co. Kerry
  • Goleen, Co. Cork
  • Greencastle, Co. Donegal
  • Greenore, Co. Louth
  • Greystones, Co. Wicklow
  • Guileen, Co. Cork
  • Howth, Co. Dublin
  • Kilkee, Co. Clare
  • Killala, Co. Mayo
  • Killybegs, Co. Donegal
  • Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
  • Knightstown, Co. Kerry
  • Mulroy, Co. Donegal
  • North Aran, Co. Galway
  • Old Head Of Kinsale, Co. Cork
  • Oysterhaven, Co. Cork
  • Rosslare, Co. Wexford
  • Seven Heads, Co. Cork
  • Skerries, Co. Dublin
  • Summercove, Co. Cork
  • Toe Head, Co. Cork
  • Tory Island, Co. Donegal
  • Tramore, Co. Waterford
  • Waterville, Co. Kerry
  • Westport, Co. Mayo
  • Wicklow
  • Youghal, Co. Cork

The roles of the Irish Coast Guard

The main roles of the Irish Coast Guard are to rescue people from danger at sea or on land, to organise immediate medical transport and to assist boats and ships within the country's jurisdiction.

Each year the Irish Coast Guard co-ordinates the response to thousands of incidents at sea and on the cliffs and beaches of Ireland. It does this through its Marine Rescue Centres which are currently based in:

  • Dublin
  • Malin Head (Co Donegal)
  • Valentia Island (Co Kerry).

Each centre is responsible for search and rescue operations.

The Dublin National Maritime Operations Centre (NMOC) provides marine search and rescue response services and co-ordinates the response to marine casualty incidents within the Irish Pollution Responsibility Zone/EEZ.

The Marine Rescue Sub Centre (MRSC) Valentia and MRSC Malin Head are 24/7 centres co-ordinating search and rescue response in their areas of responsibility.

The Marine Rescue Sub Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for routine operational matters in the area between Ballycotton and Clifden.

MRSC Malin Head is the contact point for routine operational matters in the area between Clifden and Lough Foyle.

MRCC Dublin is the contact point for routine operational matters in the area between Carlingford Lough and Ballycotton.

Each MRCC/MRSC broadcasts maritime safety information on VHF and, in some cases, MF radio in accordance with published schedules.

Maritime safety information that is broadcast by the three Marine Rescue Sub-centres includes:

  • navigational warnings as issued by the UK Hydrographic Office
  • gale warnings, shipping forecasts, local inshore forecasts, strong wind warnings and small craft warnings as issued by the Irish Meteorological Office.

Coast Guard helicopters

The Irish Coast Guard has contracted five medium-lift Sikorsky Search and Rescue helicopters deployed at bases in Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo.

The helicopters are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours and 45 minutes at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice based at Waterford.

These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties).

They can also be used for assistance in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations as authorised by the Coast Guard within appropriate regulations.

The Coast Guard can contract specialised aerial surveillance or dispersant spraying aircraft at short notice internationally.

Helicopter tasks include:

  • the location of marine and aviation incident survivors by homing onto aviation and marine radio distress transmissions, by guidance from other agencies, and by visual, electronic and electro-optical search
  • the evacuation of survivors from the sea, and medical evacuees from all manner of vessels including high-sided passenger and cargo vessels and from the islands
  • the evacuation of personnel from ships facing potential disaster
  • search and or rescue in mountainous areas, caves, rivers, lakes and waterways
  • the transport of offshore fire-fighters (MFRTs) or ambulance teams (MARTs) and their equipment following a request for assistance
  • the provision of safety cover for other search and rescue units including other Marine Emergency Service helicopters
  • pollution, casualty and salvage inspections and surveillance and the transport of associated personnel and equipment
  • inter-agency training in all relevant aspects of the primary role
  • onshore emergency medical service, including evacuation and air ambulance tasks
  • relief of the islands and of areas suffering from flooding or deep snow

The secondary roles of the helicopter are:

  • the exercise of the primary search, rescue and evacuation roles in adjacent search and rescue regions
  • assistance to onshore emergency services, such as in the evacuation of high-rise buildings
  • public safety awareness displays and demonstrations
  • providing helicopter expertise for seminars and training courses

The Irish Coast Guard provides aeronautical assets for search and rescue in the mountains of Ireland. Requests for Irish Coast Guard assets are made to the Marine Rescue Centres.

Requests are accepted from An Garda Síochána and nominated persons in Mountain Rescue Teams.

Information courtesy of Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport (July 2019)

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