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Displaying items by tag: TallShips

#Tallships - The Norwegian tallship, Christian Radich, one year short of its 80th anniversary sailed upriver from a Cork Harbour anchorage to berth in the city this morning, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The fully-rigged ship it transpires did not depart into the open seas today as previously reported. Instead the 1937 built ship berthed at the North Custom House Quay.

The visit to the city-centre is private and will run beyond the weekend to at least mid-week. This it to facilitate trainees who are to attend a maritime course.

Christian Radich is one of two of Norway’s most famous large tallships, the other ship been Statsraad Lehmkuhl dating to 1914.

The square-rigger in August made a visit to Dublin as part of National Heritage Week.

Published in Tall Ships

#UStrainingShips - A pair of US training vessels, one under sail the other motor-propelled have made new and continued old ties with Cork Harbour, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Following a transatlantic sail from the US East coast, the SSV Corwith Cramer which as previously reported made her first visit to Cork City is berthed at the marina and was made open to the public yesterday.

The 1988 built sail training vessel belongs to the Sea Education Association (SEA) and the school ship will spend over a week on the river Lee. She is expected to depart next Sunday and continue her first visit to ports on the European mainland.

Meanwhile, the other US vessel reported earlier is the veteran merchant training ship T.S. Empire State (1962/14,557grt) which has been berthed in lower Cork Harbour at Cobh has since departed.

Having said that, the former general-cargoship now a training ship of the Maritime College of the State University College of New York (SUNY) remains currently at anchor off Cork Harbour.

The ship has made Cork her Irish port of call on several occasions in addition to Dublin. Her cadets are preparing to embark on the next leg of her annual Summer Sea Term where the Danish capital of Copenhagen is her next port of call.

 

Published in Cork Harbour

#LegenderryTallShips – The Legenderry Maritime Festival held in the north-west city is where Lough Foyle has welcomed the return of the Clipper Round the World Yacht Race 2014 but also some visiting tall-ships which too are open to the public.

So why not come along and board the tallships, Earl of Pembroke and Phoenix which together have appeared in many films and TV drama's and are berthed alongside McFarland Quay. From that quayside you can embark on board these wonderful sailing vessels which are open only today, (Thursday up to 6pm). For more details of festival programme visit here.

Since the festival began on mid-summers day and concludes on Sunday 29 June, the city and along Foyle Quay has been host for the homecoming festival in welcoming the 12 strong fleet of Clipper 70 yachts. Notably as previously reported, the Derry-Londonderry-Doire skippered by the city's hero, Sean McCarter following victory in race 14 from New York to the yacht's homeport as part of the world's longest ocean race.

There will also opportunities to visit these impressive racing boats as according to the festival organiser website click HERE, Clipper Ventures are making available two of the race yachts for tours today between (2-7pm), tomorrow Friday, June 27 (2-7pm) and also on Saturday, June 28 (9am-1pm).

Forming the focalpoint of the festival is at Foyle Quay where the summer promenade, complete with race village, marine marquees, award winning continental markets and a host of sea faring activities on and off shore will be held for all to enjoy.

So to soak up the action be it learning to canoe or sail a dingy or if you're happy to just go with the flow of the festival there's something to suit everyone. Come on, dive in and blow your inhibitions out of the water!

Last but not least will be the festival's farewell send-off in bidding bon voyage to the Clipper yachts as the Parade of Sail departs on Sunday (12 noon) from MacFarland Quay for the race start at Greencastle in Co Donegal.

The Red Arrows will perform their trademark formations with close-passes and dynamic loops and rolls at the mouth of the River Foyle between Greencastle in Co. Donegal and Magilligan/Binevenagh in Co. Derry.

For more information on the full programme of events or details on how to get involved, visit www.legenderrymaritimefestival.com

 

Published in Tall Ships

#DroghedaTallShips- Now that the tallships in Drogheda Port have departed, the memories remain of ketches stretched along quaysides that also date back a century ago and longer, writes Jehan Ashmore

The 1904 built West Country trading ketch, Bessie Ellen, was one of the seven majestic sailing vessels to attend the event officially titled The Irish Maritime Festival. The three-day event follows last year's inaugural festival.

Thousands were drawn down to the quays where the eclectic gathering of vessels had berthed along Merchants and Steam Packet Quays. Both quays conveniently within reach for pedestrians to stroll along from the heart of Drogheda town centre and to where the quays end at the foot of the railway viaduct.

Making an appearance on the Saturday was the Irish-flagged Spirit of Oysterhaven, the 70 ft schooner is Ireland's only 'non-naval' sail training vessel which slipped under the Dublin-Belfast railway line. She berthed close to the 80 year old Soteria with a white hull and red band while alongside her was the all black schooner Vilma.

Bunting_Berthed_boats.jpg

 The distinctive light grey hull of ketch Irene, seen moored alongside Drogheda town quays

Drogheda_quays.jpg

Festival-goers roam the decks of Bessie Ellen and berthed ahead the hopper dredger Hebble Sand

Arguably the most rustic of the flotilla was the gaff-ketch former trawler Keewaydin which this year celebates her 101st year on the water. She had sailed from Dun Laoghaire Harbour having departed from her last UK port in Falmouth. Berthed ahead was the former Baltic trading ketch Ruth which as previously reported anchored off Dalkey in recent weeks.

The third and final ketch caller was the light-grey hulled Irene of 1907, which took part in last year’s 'Sail Home to Your Roots' event as part of the Gathering.

publicvisitshebbeldredger.jpg 

Another classic vessel, albeit without sails, the 'Hebble Sand' (pictured above) is a grab-hopper dredger built in 1963 which was made open to the public. The opportunity gave visitors a greater insight into the working operations of the 757 tonnes vessel which remains employed after more than five decades serving UK and Irish ports.

Her most recent job was carried out at the festival's host port in which Afloat.ie previously reported. The Dundalk-registered vessel is from where for many years she was based in the neighbouring Louth homeport port until sold to current owners Abco Marine. 

Published in Drogheda Port

#StenaTALLSHIP – One associates, Stena Line primarily with ferries operating across the Irish Sea, however through a division of the Stena Group, Northern Marine Management are responsible for the UK brig STA Stavros S. Niarchos, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The 59m vessel which berthed in Dublin Port today and is due to depart tomorrow is coincidental in timing as Stena Line's acquisition of Celtic Link Ferries is effective as also of today, with their first sailing tomorrow when the Tall Ships Youth Trust Sail vessel also heads out to sea.

Northern Marine Management also manages a diverse range of merchant shipping in their portfolio of more than 130 vessels including very large crude carriers (VLCC).

The Clydebank based ship, crew, and technical service management company earlier this year formed Northern Marine Ferries, which today added the former Celtic Link ro-pax Celtic Horizon to its book of vessels that they are managing for Stena Line's Irish Sea fleet.

 

 

Published in Tall Ships

#Tallships- The Sea Cadet's training tallship TS Royalist this morning departed Dun Laoghaire Harbour under the command of Skipper Angela Morris, following an overnight visit after setting off from Milford Haven in Pembrokeshire, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Royalist may be small with only 29m in length and on a beam of just over 6m, yet with her smart distinct black and white hull band colours she is easily recognisable wherever she visits ports and harbours throughout the UK.

Her 8-strong crew and 24 sea cadets are on a voyage bound for Oban, Scotland, with an en route call to Belfast so in order to exchange a new cadet crew.

Throughout her career Royalist has visited Irish ports and in recent years she has participated in the Tall Ship Races to include Waterford City in 2011 and also back in 2006 where the Asgard II, also a brigantine and of similar size led to both crews having shared a competitive yet equally friendly relationship.

This was to be Asgard II's final Irish Tall Ships Race before she sank off the Breton coast and in what will be her fifth year since the incident took place in September 2008.

The UK flagged brigantine however dates to decade earlier having been completed in 1971 though at this stage the flagship is nearing the end of her career with the Sea Cadets which has helped countless young people to experience sailing throughout the UK. The origins of the Sea Cadets date to 1856 where young given instructions on a naval theme.

Present-day activities of the Sea Cadets involve 14,000 young people based in 400 units throughout towns, cities and ports in the UK. The cadets are presented challenges while also developing new skills, like sailing, boating and even rock climbing. All this work is provided with the support of 9,000 volunteers.

Sea cadets age between 10-17 years old and they are divided into the following age groups- Junior cadets (10-12), Sea Cadets(12 -17) and the Royal Marines Cadets ranging between 13-17 respectively.

Royalist is nearing the end of her career and funds are required to build a slightly larger replacement with the Sea Cadets launching a new ship appeal campaign, so that future generations can continue the chance to sail at sea until the mid-21st century.

 

Published in Tall Ships

#TallCruiseShip- One good easily think another tallship visitor has called to Dublin Port, however what makes the majestic 117m Sea Cloud II stand out is not just beauty but that she is a cruiseship and with a mere 64 guests on board the luxury vessel, writes Jehan Ashmore.

The three-masted Sea Cloud II is to remain berthed overnight in the capital tonight, so allowing her guests another day to explore having docked early this morning from Cork Harbour. She is berthed at Sir John Rogersons Quay within the 'Docklands' Quarter of the city.

Despite her appearance, the barque was only built in 2001 and she can set a total sail area of approximately 32,150 sq. feet (3.000 m²), noting to scroll down the page for sail-plan.

Operated by Sea Cloud Cruises the Maltese flagged vessel is berthed between the Samuel Beckett swing-bridge and the East-Link toll-lift bridge. Should you be around including those taking a lunch-break in the neighbouring office- blocks, a closer inspection is worth the stroll along the campshires.

Sea Cloud II is scheduled to depart around teatime tomorrow and she follows exactly a week ago to the departure of the five-masted Club Med II which despite not setting sails still made for a refreshingly different 'cruiseship' sight as she glided out of Dublin Bay.

The final member of this trio of 'sail-assisted' cruiseships visiting our shores Wind Surf is to make an anchorage call off Dunmore East next Tuesday and a call to Dun Laoghaire also next week.

 

Published in Cruise Liners

#CruiseTallShips – An unprecedented number of cruiseships also equipped with sailing masts are to visit Irish ports this season, starting with the arrival of the five-masted Club Med 2 to Cork Harbour tomorrow, writes Jehan Ashmore.

Club Med's impressive 637-foot vessel is to dock alongside Cobh Cruise Terminal around dawn tomorrow and a further two such cruiseships the Sea Cloud II and Wind Surf are to visit Irish ports before mid-July.

Those privileged to experience a cruise on these types of cruiseships have the added opportunity in operating the rigging systems, albeit they are mechanically controlled.

Sea Cloud II which has three masts has a total sail area of approximately 32,150 sq. feet (3.000 m²) and carries a mere 64-passengers. She is operated by Sea Cloud Cruises and the 384-foot vessel is also to head for Cork Harbour, however on this occasion during her call on 13 July, she is expected to take anchorage off the Whitegate Oil Refinery.

The final member of the trio is another five-masted vessel, Windstar Cruises 310-passenger Wind Surf. The 535-foot long vessel is heading too for the south coast on 16 July when she also makes an anchorage call off Dunmore East.

Further calls by the trio are to include visits to Belfast Harbour, Dublin Port and Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

 

Published in Cruise Liners

#MaritimeFestival –The Belfast Titanic Maritime Festival will be held this Bank holiday weekend (25-27 May) and will be a family fun event centred around the harbour at Abercorn Basin and Titanic Belfast Plaza.

The three-day event organised by Belfast City Council will include opportunities to climb on board tall ships, watch swashbuckling pirate re-enactments on the River Lagan, take in a Titanic-themed talk or tour.

Test your skills at laser quest and enjoy free family entertainment and street theatre along the quayside, including arts and crafts, face painting, balloon modelling and caricature drawings.

You'll also see the newly restored SS Nomadic, the boat that transported first-class passengers to RMS Titanic. Public tours of the SS Nomadic begin 1 June, 10am- 6pm; for booking details visit: www.nomadicbelfast.com

For further details about the festival click HERE.

 

Published in Titanic

#TallShips - Sail Training Ireland and Dutch based At Sea Sail Training are to the host the "Gathering at Sea" between 14-28 July.

This event will see the Tall Ship Astrid sail from Southampton to Cherbourg via Kinsale.

The 14 day voyage is part funded by the European Youth in Action Project and is the goal of International Exchanges to unite youngsters from all over Europe.

Sailing a vessel together is the best way to experience each other's cultures in real life. As we would like to offer this experience to as many young people as possible, we apply for funding with the EU program Youth in Action.

The Astrid, "Gathering at Sea" is available for 15-25 year olds and the European Union exchange programme as stated above to take in the following ports of Southampton to Cherbourg via Kinsale. Participating countries are from France, The Netherlands, UK and Ireland.

The costs are: €925 (normal fee €1,295), due to funding from the EU the price is reduced and where there is to be a 70 % of the transfer costs back). For further details contact Monique in At Sea Sail Training at this email: [email protected]

Published in Tall Ships
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The Irish Coast Guard

The Irish Coast Guard is Ireland's fourth 'Blue Light' service (along with An Garda Síochána, the Ambulance Service and the Fire Service). It provides a nationwide maritime emergency organisation as well as a variety of services to shipping and other government agencies.

The purpose of the Irish Coast Guard is to promote safety and security standards, and by doing so, prevent as far as possible, the loss of life at sea, and on inland waters, mountains and caves, and to provide effective emergency response services and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The Irish Coast Guard has responsibility for Ireland's system of marine communications, surveillance and emergency management in Ireland's Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and certain inland waterways.

It is responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue and counter-pollution and ship casualty operations. It also has responsibility for vessel traffic monitoring.

Operations in respect of maritime security, illegal drug trafficking, illegal migration and fisheries enforcement are co-ordinated by other bodies within the Irish Government.

On average, each year, the Irish Coast Guard is expected to:

  • handle 3,000 marine emergencies
  • assist 4,500 people and save about 200 lives
  • task Coast Guard helicopters on missions

The Coast Guard has been around in some form in Ireland since 1908.

Coast Guard helicopters

The Irish Coast Guard has contracted five medium-lift Sikorsky Search and Rescue helicopters deployed at bases in Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo.

The helicopters are designated wheels up from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours and 45 minutes at night. One aircraft is fitted and its crew trained for under slung cargo operations up to 3000kgs and is available on short notice based at Waterford.

These aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains of Ireland (32 counties).

They can also be used for assistance in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and aerial surveillance during daylight hours, lifting and passenger operations and other operations as authorised by the Coast Guard within appropriate regulations.

Irish Coastguard FAQs

The Irish Coast Guard provides nationwide maritime emergency response, while also promoting safety and security standards. It aims to prevent the loss of life at sea, on inland waters, on mountains and in caves; and to safeguard the quality of the marine environment.

The main role of the Irish Coast Guard is to rescue people from danger at sea or on land, to organise immediate medical transport and to assist boats and ships within the country's jurisdiction. It has three marine rescue centres in Dublin, Malin Head, Co Donegal, and Valentia Island, Co Kerry. The Dublin National Maritime Operations centre provides marine search and rescue responses and coordinates the response to marine casualty incidents with the Irish exclusive economic zone (EEZ).

Yes, effectively, it is the fourth "blue light" service. The Marine Rescue Sub-Centre (MRSC) Valentia is the contact point for the coastal area between Ballycotton, Co Cork and Clifden, Co Galway. At the same time, the MRSC Malin Head covers the area between Clifden and Lough Foyle. Marine Rescue Co-ordination Centre (MRCC) Dublin covers Carlingford Lough, Co Louth to Ballycotton, Co Cork. Each MRCC/MRSC also broadcasts maritime safety information on VHF and MF radio, including navigational and gale warnings, shipping forecasts, local inshore forecasts, strong wind warnings and small craft warnings.

The Irish Coast Guard handles about 3,000 marine emergencies annually, and assists 4,500 people - saving an estimated 200 lives, according to the Department of Transport. In 2016, Irish Coast Guard helicopters completed 1,000 missions in a single year for the first time.

Yes, Irish Coast Guard helicopters evacuate medical patients from offshore islands to hospital on average about 100 times a year. In September 2017, the Department of Health announced that search and rescue pilots who work 24-hour duties would not be expected to perform any inter-hospital patient transfers. The Air Corps flies the Emergency Aeromedical Service, established in 2012 and using an AW139 twin-engine helicopter. Known by its call sign "Air Corps 112", it airlifted its 3,000th patient in autumn 2020.

The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the British Maritime and Coastguard Agency, which is responsible for the Northern Irish coast.

The Irish Coast Guard is a State-funded service, with both paid management personnel and volunteers, and is under the auspices of the Department of Transport, Tourism and Sport. It is allocated approximately 74 million euro annually in funding, some 85 per cent of which pays for a helicopter contract that costs 60 million euro annually. The overall funding figure is "variable", an Oireachtas committee was told in 2019. Other significant expenditure items include volunteer training exercises, equipment, maintenance, renewal, and information technology.

The Irish Coast Guard has four search and rescue helicopter bases at Dublin, Waterford, Shannon and Sligo, run on a contract worth 50 million euro annually with an additional 10 million euro in costs by CHC Ireland. It provides five medium-lift Sikorsky S-92 helicopters and trained crew. The 44 Irish Coast Guard coastal units with 1,000 volunteers are classed as onshore search units, with 23 of the 44 units having rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) and 17 units having cliff rescue capability. The Irish Coast Guard has 60 buildings in total around the coast, and units have search vehicles fitted with blue lights, all-terrain vehicles or quads, first aid equipment, generators and area lighting, search equipment, marine radios, pyrotechnics and appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE). The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and Community Rescue Boats Ireland also provide lifeboats and crews to assist in search and rescue. The Irish Coast Guard works closely with the Garda Siochána, National Ambulance Service, Naval Service and Air Corps, Civil Defence, while fishing vessels, ships and other craft at sea offer assistance in search operations.

The helicopters are designated as airborne from initial notification in 15 minutes during daylight hours, and 45 minutes at night. The aircraft respond to emergencies at sea, on inland waterways, offshore islands and mountains and cover the 32 counties. They can also assist in flooding, major inland emergencies, intra-hospital transfers, pollution, and can transport offshore firefighters and ambulance teams. The Irish Coast Guard volunteers units are expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time of departing from the station house in ten minutes from notification during daylight and 20 minutes at night. They are also expected to achieve a 90 per cent response time to the scene of the incident in less than 60 minutes from notification by day and 75 minutes at night, subject to geographical limitations.

Units are managed by an officer-in-charge (three stripes on the uniform) and a deputy officer in charge (two stripes). Each team is trained in search skills, first aid, setting up helicopter landing sites and a range of maritime skills, while certain units are also trained in cliff rescue.

Volunteers receive an allowance for time spent on exercises and call-outs. What is the difference between the Irish Coast Guard and the RNLI? The RNLI is a registered charity which has been saving lives at sea since 1824, and runs a 24/7 volunteer lifeboat service around the British and Irish coasts. It is a declared asset of the British Maritime and Coast Guard Agency and the Irish Coast Guard. Community Rescue Boats Ireland is a community rescue network of volunteers under the auspices of Water Safety Ireland.

No, it does not charge for rescue and nor do the RNLI or Community Rescue Boats Ireland.

The marine rescue centres maintain 19 VHF voice and DSC radio sites around the Irish coastline and a digital paging system. There are two VHF repeater test sites, four MF radio sites and two NAVTEX transmitter sites. Does Ireland have a national search and rescue plan? The first national search and rescue plan was published in July, 2019. It establishes the national framework for the overall development, deployment and improvement of search and rescue services within the Irish Search and Rescue Region and to meet domestic and international commitments. The purpose of the national search and rescue plan is to promote a planned and nationally coordinated search and rescue response to persons in distress at sea, in the air or on land.

Yes, the Irish Coast Guard is responsible for responding to spills of oil and other hazardous substances with the Irish pollution responsibility zone, along with providing an effective response to marine casualties and monitoring or intervening in marine salvage operations. It provides and maintains a 24-hour marine pollution notification at the three marine rescue centres. It coordinates exercises and tests of national and local pollution response plans.

The first Irish Coast Guard volunteer to die on duty was Caitriona Lucas, a highly trained member of the Doolin Coast Guard unit, while assisting in a search for a missing man by the Kilkee unit in September 2016. Six months later, four Irish Coast Guard helicopter crew – Dara Fitzpatrick, Mark Duffy, Paul Ormsby and Ciarán Smith -died when their Sikorsky S-92 struck Blackrock island off the Mayo coast on March 14, 2017. The Dublin-based Rescue 116 crew were providing "top cover" or communications for a medical emergency off the west coast and had been approaching Blacksod to refuel. Up until the five fatalities, the Irish Coast Guard recorded that more than a million "man hours" had been spent on more than 30,000 rescue missions since 1991.

Several investigations were initiated into each incident. The Marine Casualty Investigation Board was critical of the Irish Coast Guard in its final report into the death of Caitriona Lucas, while a separate Health and Safety Authority investigation has been completed, but not published. The Air Accident Investigation Unit final report into the Rescue 116 helicopter crash has not yet been published.

The Irish Coast Guard in its present form dates back to 1991, when the Irish Marine Emergency Service was formed after a campaign initiated by Dr Joan McGinley to improve air/sea rescue services on the west Irish coast. Before Irish independence, the British Admiralty was responsible for a Coast Guard (formerly the Water Guard or Preventative Boat Service) dating back to 1809. The West Coast Search and Rescue Action Committee was initiated with a public meeting in Killybegs, Co Donegal, in 1988 and the group was so effective that a Government report was commissioned, which recommended setting up a new division of the Department of the Marine to run the Marine Rescue Co-Ordination Centre (MRCC), then based at Shannon, along with the existing coast radio service, and coast and cliff rescue. A medium-range helicopter base was established at Shannon within two years. Initially, the base was served by the Air Corps.

The first director of what was then IMES was Capt Liam Kirwan, who had spent 20 years at sea and latterly worked with the Marine Survey Office. Capt Kirwan transformed a poorly funded voluntary coast and cliff rescue service into a trained network of cliff and sea rescue units – largely voluntary, but with paid management. The MRCC was relocated from Shannon to an IMES headquarters at the then Department of the Marine (now Department of Transport) in Leeson Lane, Dublin. The coast radio stations at Valentia, Co Kerry, and Malin Head, Co Donegal, became marine rescue-sub-centres.

The current director is Chris Reynolds, who has been in place since August 2007 and was formerly with the Naval Service. He has been seconded to the head of mission with the EUCAP Somalia - which has a mandate to enhance Somalia's maritime civilian law enforcement capacity – since January 2019.

  • Achill, Co. Mayo
  • Ardmore, Co. Waterford
  • Arklow, Co. Wicklow
  • Ballybunion, Co. Kerry
  • Ballycotton, Co. Cork
  • Ballyglass, Co. Mayo
  • Bonmahon, Co. Waterford
  • Bunbeg, Co. Donegal
  • Carnsore, Co. Wexford
  • Castlefreake, Co. Cork
  • Castletownbere, Co. Cork
  • Cleggan, Co. Galway
  • Clogherhead, Co. Louth
  • Costelloe Bay, Co. Galway
  • Courtown, Co. Wexford
  • Crosshaven, Co. Cork
  • Curracloe, Co. Wexford
  • Dingle, Co. Kerry
  • Doolin, Co. Clare
  • Drogheda, Co. Louth
  • Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin
  • Dunmore East, Co. Waterford
  • Fethard, Co. Wexford
  • Glandore, Co. Cork
  • Glenderry, Co. Kerry
  • Goleen, Co. Cork
  • Greencastle, Co. Donegal
  • Greenore, Co. Louth
  • Greystones, Co. Wicklow
  • Guileen, Co. Cork
  • Howth, Co. Dublin
  • Kilkee, Co. Clare
  • Killala, Co. Mayo
  • Killybegs, Co. Donegal
  • Kilmore Quay, Co. Wexford
  • Knightstown, Co. Kerry
  • Mulroy, Co. Donegal
  • North Aran, Co. Galway
  • Old Head Of Kinsale, Co. Cork
  • Oysterhaven, Co. Cork
  • Rosslare, Co. Wexford
  • Seven Heads, Co. Cork
  • Skerries, Co. Dublin Summercove, Co. Cork
  • Toe Head, Co. Cork
  • Tory Island, Co. Donegal
  • Tramore, Co. Waterford
  • Waterville, Co. Kerry
  • Westport, Co. Mayo
  • Wicklow
  • Youghal, Co. Cork

Sources: Department of Transport © Afloat 2020

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