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Displaying items by tag: Coastguard

Liverpool Coastguard are reminding people to check the tide times before venturing out to the coast today after they sent resources to rescue 93 people cut off by the tide in five different incidents on the Irish Sea this afternoon.

The first call came in at 13.13 when four people became stranded near Fleetwood.  Fleetwood Coastguard Rescue Team proceeded to the scene and they were safely brought ashore.  The Lytham Coastguard Rescue Team were then tasked to a report of 70 people cut off by the tide at Blackpool near the South Pier. With Blackpool Beach Patrol and the Blackpool RNLI Lifeboat also on scene assisting everyone was subsequently reported as safely back to the shore.

At 13.41 Liverpool Coastguard received reports of two separate groups (one of five people, and one of nine people including four children) who had become stranded on sandbanks in Blackpool off Norbreck Castle.  Once again Fleetwood Coastguard Rescue Team were sent to assist in getting them safely back to the shore.

At 14.35 Liverpool Coastguard sent Arnside Coastguard Rescue Team to a woman and two dogs who were cut off by the tide at Sandside near Arnside.  The Morecambe RNLI Hovercraft was launched and took the lady and her dogs back to safety.

Finally, at 14.41 Liverpool Coastguard received a call reporting four girls potentially stranded on the spit at Little Eye in West Kirby.  Hoylake Coastguard Team attended to investigate but the girls were deemed to be not in danger.

Liverpool Coastguard Watch Manager Su Daintith said:

"We know that on a beautiful like today that people don't want to waste any time getting to the beach in order to soak up the sunshine.  But just two minutes spent checking the tide times (and there are plenty of resources available where you can find these) could mean the difference between a carefree day and a Coastguard Team coming to your rescue."

Published in Coastguard
With the lighter evenings now approaching and better weather on its way (hopefully!) many boaters will be thinking about getting back out on the water and sailing again. But have you carried out all of the maintenance needed to ensure that your boat is safe and seaworthy?

"Many of the water-based incidents that we deal with at this time of year involve engine breakdown as a result of lack of maintenance," says Garry Hall of the UK's Solent Coastguard. "People report running out of fuel, sometimes because fuel indicators are broken or because fuel can't get through pipes and the engine is starved. Electrical issues are also a frequent problem. Often oxidation happens if engines are laid open to the elements and it affects the wiring. Engines are susceptible to frost so following our cold winter they will certainly need a good service."

Ideally attend a Diesel engine maintenance course, see:
www.rya.org.uk/coursestraining/courses/specialist/Pages/Diesel.aspx

Whilst you're considering maintenance, don't forget to look at your lifejackets and make sure that they are functioning fully. Remove the cylinders and auto-mechanisms, washing them in fresh water. Now inflate the lifejackets using a hand pump, leaving them for 24 hours to make sure that they don't deflate. Then reassemble the lifejacket, ensuring that the cylinder is screwed back in securely. The RNLI have some good advice about how to maintain your lifejacket on their website. Go to www.rnli.org.uk/seasafety

Appropriate and fully functioning communications equipment will be vital should you find yourself in an emergency situation.  Have you got all the right equipment?

Check all your existing communication equipment.  Ensure your VHF DSC radio unit's MMSI registration is up to date with Ofcom so that the Coastguard has the right emergency contact details.  If you have an emergency position-indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or a personal locator beacon (PLB),  replace batteries before they expire and don't just rely on the "test" button.  Also ensure the beacon's registration details are up to date so that the Coastguard has the right emergency contact details and correct information for both yourself and your vessel.

 

Published in Marine Warning
Holyhead RNLI's lifeboat was dispatched on Tuesday morning to rescue two boys from a rocky outcrop just outside Holyhead harbour.
The boys, aged 13 and 14, had ventured out to Piebio Island, which is accessible at low tide, but quickly became stranded when the water rose.
After receiving a 999 call from the boys, Holyhead Coastguard tasked Holyhead RNLI with their recovery. The boys were soon retrieved and returned to school by the coastguard rescue team.
Holyhead Coastguard watch manager Barry Priddis urged anyone going to the coast over the Easter school holidays to make sure they keep aware of the tide times.
"We want everyone to enjoy their holidays at the coast and to go home safe," he said.

Holyhead RNLI's lifeboat was dispatched on Tuesday morning to rescue two boys from a rocky outcrop just outside Holyhead harbour.

The boys, aged 13 and 14, had ventured out to Piebio Island, which is accessible at low tide, but quickly became stranded when the water rose. 

After receiving a 999 call from the boys, Holyhead Coastguard tasked Holyhead RNLI with their recovery. The boys were soon retrieved and returned to school by the coastguard rescue team. 

Holyhead Coastguard watch manager Barry Priddis urged anyone going to the coast over the Easter school holidays to make sure they keep aware of the tide times.

"We want everyone to enjoy their holidays at the coast and to go home safe," he said.

Published in Rescue
The search for two fishermen missing off the north Co Dublin coast has resumed this morning.
The Irish Times reports that the two men, believed to be in their 20s and 40s, were on a small open fishing boat that departed Skerries harbour around 11am yesterday (Friday 1 April). The alarm was raised at 6.30pm when they failed to return to port.
A Dublin Coast Guard spokesperson confirmed that items and debris believed to be from the missing boat were discovered during the initial search yesterday evening.
The search, involving three coastguard units, three lifeboats and a number of local vessels, was scheduled to resume at 7am this morning.
RTÉ News has more on the story - including video - HERE.

The lifeboat and Coastguard search for two fishermen missing off the north Co Dublin coast has resumed this morning.

The Irish Times reports that the two men, believed to be in their 20s and 40s, were on a small open fishing boat that departed Skerries harbour around 11am yesterday (Friday 1 April). The alarm was raised at 6.30pm when they failed to return to port.

A Dublin Coast Guard spokesperson confirmed that items and debris believed to be from the missing boat were discovered during the initial search yesterday evening.

The search, involving three coastguard units, three lifeboats and a number of local vessels, was scheduled to resume at 7am this morning.

RTÉ News has more on the story - including video - HERE.

Published in Rescue
The union representing coastguard staff in the UK has expressed its fears over the loss of air rescue services when a number of helicopters are transferred to Ireland next year.
Under CHC's €500m contract to provide search and rescue services for the Irish Coast Guard, four helicopters will be withdrawn from England and Scotland for redeployment in Ireland.
However, HeraldScotland reports that the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) has are no plans to replace these helicopters, which currently service Scotland's Isle of Lewis and Shetland Islands, as well as the Solent and Portland in England.
The recent collapse of the privatisation deal for UK search and rescue services has meant there is no new operator lined up to replace CHC.
Jeremy Gautrey of the PCS union said that the situation "has now potentially left the coastguard service stranded without the guarantee that it will have sufficient helicopters to carry out search-and-rescue operations when the current helicopters retire."
HeraldScotland has more on the story HERE.

The union representing coastguard staff in the UK has expressed its fears over the loss of air rescue services when a number of helicopters are transferred to Ireland next year.

Under CHC's €500m contract to provide search and rescue services for the Irish Coast Guard, four helicopters will be withdrawn from England and Scotland for redeployment in Ireland.

However, HeraldScotland reports that the Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) has no plans to replace these helicopters, which separately service Scotland's Isle of Lewis and Shetland Islands as well as the Solent and Portland in England.

The recent collapse of the privatisation deal for UK search and rescue services has meant there is no new operator lined up to replace CHC.

Jeremy Gautrey of the PCS union said that the situation "has now potentially left the coastguard service stranded without the guarantee that it will have sufficient helicopters to carry out search-and-rescue operations when the current helicopters retire."

HeraldScotland has more on the story HERE.

Published in Coastguard
Achill Coast Guard Unit, (recipients of a National Courage Award in November 2010) will this weekend be honoured as part of the festivities for the third largest St. Patricks Parade in the world (in Birmingham, UK). The Unit were invited to participate, to mark their bravery during a particularly hazardous search and rescue operation which took place off Achill Island in August 2009. The St. Patricks festivities in Birmingham this weekend are expected to attract more than 100,000 spectators.

Speaking today, Minister for Transport Leo Varadkar TD said: This invitation to Achill Coast Guard Unit is an acknowledgement of the life-saving work that this Unit (and indeed all our Volunteer Units) around the country are engaged in every day of the year. Every day, these people selflessly risk their own lives to save others in all weathers, day and night, often in very dangerous conditions. This invitation is in recognition of their work and is an indication of the high esteem in which our Coast Guard Units are held internationally."

Achill Island Coast Guard Unit is made up of 24 volunteers who carry pagers and are available on 15 minutes' notice day and night 365 days a year. In August 2009 the Unit took part in a search and rescue operation for a person who fell into the Atlantic Ocean while fishing off the rocks near Achill Island. In response to this incident, the Achill Coast Guard rescue boat was launched together with local RNLI Ballyglass Unit and the Sligo Coast Guard helicopter during very hazardous weather conditions. The casualty (a Mr. Patrick Williamson) who amazingly stayed afloat swimming in high seas for over an hour was successfully rescued and spent 5 days in intensive care following his ordeal in the sea.

On making a full recovery, Mr. Williamson nominated Achill Island Coast Guard Unit for a National Courage Award. Previous recipients of this honour include the Irish Army (for peacekeeping duties) and former Taoiseach Mr. Bertie Ahern (for his involvement in the peace talks in Northern Ireland).

Director of the Irish Coast Guard, Mr. Chris Reynolds today said: "The Achill Coast Guard Unit is well-deserving of this honour and I congratulate them on being part of this special event. It is a great recognition of the standard and quality of service the Coast Guard provide and I thank Mr. Williamson along with all who helped make this happen for inviting them to take part in this special event."

Published in Coastguard

It maybe the second last item on the programme for government issued by Enda Kenny and Eamon Gilmore yesterday but the indications are good that the marine sector will see a reinstated Department of the Marine. the Fine Gael and Labour coalition say 'marine responsibilities will be merged under one Department, for better co-ordination in policy delivery'. Here is the relevant excerpt:

Coastal communities, fisheries & marine environment

We will negotiate the best possible deal for fishermen in the review of the Common Fisheries Policy.

We will support the development of sustainable aquaculture and fish farms by streamlining the licensing process and reducing associated bureaucracy.

Marine responsibilities will be merged under one Department, for better co-ordination in policy delivery. We will develop an integrated marine and coastal planning process in order to maximise the potential of Ireland's coastline in fishing, aquaculture, ocean energy and tourism.

A Sea Fisheries Sustainability Impact Assessment, based on consultation with all major stakeholders, will be brought before the Dáil annually before EU fisheries negotiations commence.

We will replace criminal sanctions system for minor fisheries offences with administrative sanction system to bring Ireland into line with other European jurisdictions. Safety at sea and decent working conditions must underpin the development of the fisheries sector. We will explore the provision of an emergency towing vessel for the Coastguard.

Published in News Update
The Maritime and Coastguard Agency is holding a public meeting in Belfast on Thursday 3rd March 2011, about the proposed Coastguard modernisation programme.

The meeting will provide an opportunity for the community around the existing Belfast Maritime Rescue Coordination Centre (MRCC) to hear more about the proposals, ask questions of MCA representatives and air their views.

The meeting at Marine Court Hotel, 18-20 Quay Street, Bangor. BT20 5ED will be independently chaired and begin at 7:30pm. The meeting is expecting to draw to a close by 9:00pm.

The proposals for Coastguard modernisation, together with the consultation documents, can be found on the MCA website at www.mcga.gov.uk  and www.dft.gov.uk

Published in Coastguard
A search for a missing 18 year old boy that was launched after his friends feared he had fallen from Central Pier was stood down at 01.50 this morning after he was found hiding in the crew accommodation of a nearby fishing vessel.

The call came in at 23.40 from a member of the marina staff after the boy's two friends had told him that all three of them had climbed over the gate into the pier, but that their friend had not come back and they were concerned that he must have fallen into the water.

Belfast Coastguard sent the Bangor Coastguard Rescue Team to begin a search, as well as requesting the launch of the Bangor RNLI lifeboat. Members of the Police, Ambulance and Fire Service are also on scene.

At 01.50, the boy was found hiding in a compartment in the crew accommodation of a fishing vessel near the pier, and the search was stood down.

Belfast Coastguard Watch Manager Alan Pritchard said:

"This group of three boys had been at a birthday party in the town before climbing the gate this evening to access the pier.  Incidents such as these remind of us of the dangers of being in proximity to the water when you have been drinking alcohol – be it going swimming, or walking along cliffs or piers.  Although on this occasion the boy has been found safe and well, this could easily have been a much more serious incident."

Published in Coastguard
RNLI Bangor Lifeboat launched at 3pm on Sunday 20th February 2011 to search for 6 year old boy reported missing from Lukes Point close to Ballyholme Bay which is on the southern shores of Belfast Lough.

Belfast Coastguard received the initial call for help and requested RNLI Bangor Lifeboat to launch immediately and start searching the shoreline between Lukes Point and Ballyholme Bay.

Within minutes of the rescue pagers being activated volunteer crew at RNLI Bangor Lifeboat had assembled and launched the lifeboat.

Knowing that this type of rescue was time critical, volunteer crew not on board the lifeboat proceeded on foot and by bike to the Ballyholme Bay area.

Thankfully one of the RNLI volunteers on shore spotted the young boy ½ mile from the initial search area and was able to reunite him with his parents.

Peter Semple the volunteer crew member who found the young boy said. 'We are extremely happy and relieved that the young boy has been found'. He added 'We were delighted to reunite him with his parents'.

Related Safety posts

RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Safety News


Rescue News from RNLI Lifeboats in Ireland


Coast Guard News from Ireland


Water Safety News from Ireland

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Marine Warnings

Published in RNLI Lifeboats
Page 52 of 58

Every Year Ireland's Search & Rescue Services deliver emergency life saving work on our seas, lakes and rivers.

Ireland's Water Safety Agencies work hard to provide us with the information we need to keep safe, while enjoying all manner of water based activities.

There's no better fun than getting out on the water but being afloat is a responsibility we all need to take seriously.

These pages detail the work of the rescue agencies. We also aim to promote safety standards among pleasure boaters, and by doing so, prevent, as far as possible, the loss of life at sea and on inland waters. If you have ideas for our pages we'd love to hear from you. Please email us at [email protected]

Think Before You Sink - Wear a Lifejacket

Accidents can happen fast on water and there may not be time to reach for a lifejacket in an emergency therefore don't just carry a lifejacket - wear it; if it's not on you, it can't save your life.

Irish Water Safety's Safe Boating Alert:

Check condition of boat and equipment, hull, engine, fuel, tools, torch.

Check the weather forecast for the area.

Check locally concerning dangerous currents and strong tides.

Do not drink alcohol while setting out or during your trip.

Carry an alternative means of propulsion e.g. sails and oars or motor and oars.

Carry a first aid kit on board and distress signals (at least two parachute distress rockets, two red hand flares).

Carry a fire extinguisher, a hand bailer or bucket with lanyard and an anchor with rope attached.

Carry marine radio or some means of communication with shore.

Do not overload the boat - this will make it unstable.

Do not set out unless accompanied by an experienced person.

Leave details of your planned trip with someone ashore - including departure and arrival times, description of boat, names of persons on board, etc.

Wear a Lifejacket at all times.

Keep an eye on the weather - seek shelter in good time.

In Marine Emergencies, call 999 or 112 and ask for Marine Rescue.

Lifejackets Checklist

Ensure Cartridges have not been punctured and are secured firmly.

Ensure all zips, buckles, fasteners and webbing straps are functioning correctly and adjusted to fit the user.

Check that fitted lights are operating correctly.

Ensure that Automatic Inflation devices are fully serviced and in date.

Check that the valve or lifejacket is not leaking.