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Displaying items by tag: Coastal Rowing

The Hobblers Challenge Trophy went to St. Michael’s Men and the brand new Hobblers Challenge Ladies Trophy goes to St. Michael’s Ladies 1. The race commenced at 10:20 on 1 September 2018. St. Michael’s Men completed the race in 2 hours and 47 minutes. Six crews from four east coast rowing clubs competed in this year’s race.

Hobblers Challenge

The race builds on the tradition of the ‘Hobblers Challenge’ race, hosted by St. Michael’s Rowing Club at various times since the 1990s, which used a number of courses, predominantly from Dun Laoghaire Harbour to the Kish Lighthouse and back.

St. Michaels Ladies 1 CrewSt. Michaels Ladies 1 Crew. Crews comprised of all female, mixed, and male categories

The 2018 course followed an inshore course of the same length, but still begins and ends in Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

East coast rowers use a traditional clinker-built boat called a skiff, which takes four rowers, one per oar, and a cox. With fixed seats, wooden oars, and clinker-built boats, the sport as we know it differs significantly from our freshwater ‘Olympic-style’ cousins. The traditional style boat build is not only beautiful but powerful.

The course

The course is 27 km long and starts at Dun Laoghaire Harbour, at the east breakwater beneath the Hobblers Memorial, out the harbour mouth, around the landward side of a ‘gate boat’ off Merrion Strand, around Poolbeg Lighthouse, up the Liffey as far as the ESB towers, before doubling back, across the mouth of Dun Laoghaire Harbour, across Scotsman’s Bay, past Sandycove and Bullock Harbour, turning at Coliemore Harbour, before returning to Dun Laoghaire Harbour, finishing at the end of the East Breakwater.

Race times

St. Michael’s Men - 2 hrs 47 mins

Skerries Mixed - 3 hrs 1 min

St. Michael’s Ladies 1 - 3 hrs 3mins

Dalkey Ladies - 3 hrs 9 mins

St. Michael’s Ladies 2 - 3 hrs 47 mins

Fingal Ladies (Short course) 2 hrs 7 mins

The Hobblers Challenge Trophy went to St. Michael’s Men and the brand new Hobblers Challenge Ladies Trophy goes to St. Michael’s Ladies 1.

Ger Ryan, Club Chairperson of St. Michael’s Rowing Club – Dun Laoghaire, said: “Congratulations to St. Michael’s on winning this year’s long race and well done to the clubs and the crews who competed in the race. It’s no easy feat to complete the gruelling 27 km race, it’s a real test of fitness, power, and mental strength. Unfortunately, last year’s race was called off at the last minute due to poor weather conditions. It was great to see this year’s race go ahead and we look forward to inviting east coast rowing clubs to compete again next year.”

Published in Coastal Rowing
Tagged under

#Coastal Rowing: The inaugural Irish Coastal Rowing Championships will take place this Saturday and Sunday, August 18th and 19th at the National Rowing Centre in Farran Wood, Cork. Clubs from all four provinces are set to compete.

 Eddie Farr, chair of the Coastal Championships Committee, said: “This is an incredibly proud moment in all our rowing lives, to at last get to row at our national and international rowing venue.”

 The Championships, hosted by Rushbrooke Rowing Club, will see clubs race in over 30 different race categories, ranging from Under 12 to Masters, with race lengths ranging from 800 to 2,300 metres.  Several thousand rowers and spectators are expected to attend the two day Championships.

 The long-standing All Ireland Coastal Rowing Championships will also be held this weekend, from Friday to Sunday (August 17th to 19th) in Wexford. There will be an array of races in one-design Celtic boats, Currachs, East coast Skiffs, Wexford cots, Kerry four-oars, Donegal skiffs and Seine boats.

Published in Rowing

The National Rowing Centre, Farran Woods, Cork provided the  backdrop for the launch of the 2018 Irish Coastal Rowing Championships which will be hosted at the Centre by Rushbrooke Rowing Club on the weekend of the 18th / 19th August this year.

Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, Michael Creed TD, was the special guest for the ceremony which included representatives from Rowing Ireland, the Championships Committee and the Host Club. Minister Creed paid tribute to the team behind the event and said that it was great to see a different code of Rowing utilising the fantastic facilities that the National Rowing Centre has to offer. He also commented that it will be great to see the various traditional coastal boats from throughout Ireland taking part.

Kieran Kerr, Chairperson, Rowing Ireland Coastal Committee said ‘This is a momentous occasion as the National Rowing Centre hosts an Irish Coastal Championship for the first time on a new course, adjacent to the existing Olympic course. We are extremely fortunate to have the National Rowing Centre. In addition to the small army of volunteers without which an event of this nature could not take place, I would like to thank two other groups. The first is the Coastal Championship Committee which met monthly since December to ensure the Championships are well organised and run to a high standard. The second is the host club which this year is Rushbrooke Rowing Club. As the “feet on the ground” in the National Rowing Centre, Rushbrooke are leaving no stone unturned in making all the necessary arrangements. We look forward to seeing you and your club in the National Rowing Centre in August.

This year’s championships, which will be the inaugural one run under the auspices of Rowing Ireland, will take place on Saturday the 18th and Sunday the 19th August and there promises to be a spectacular showcase of coastal rowing, with Clubs from all four Provinces of Ireland coming to Cork to compete at the highest levels of the sport.

The Championships will provide a boost with the event likely to attract in excess of 2,000 competitors and 3,000 spectators to the National Rowing Centre over the two days.

Ted McSweeney, Chairperson of the Host Club, Rushbrooke Rowing Club, said ‘We are honoured as a club to have been successful with our bid to host this event and we are delighted to be hosting the event at the National Rowing Centre in Cork, the Home of Rowing in Ireland. We look forward to a great weekend of racing from U12’s up to Masters.’

Regatta Director for this year’s event, Shane Russell said that trojan work has been underway in the preparation for the event. He complimented the work of the Championships Committee of Rowing Ireland and the Host Club for the immense effort being put in. He said, ‘this event is the pinnacle for the competitors involved and that this event will showcase the very best of what coastal rowing has to offer’.

Published in Coastal Rowing
Tagged under
27th February 2018

Big Year for Three Rowing Codes

#Rowing: The year 2018 is set to be big one for Rowing Ireland. The National Rowing Centre will host a festival of rowing over three weeks in July. The Irish Championships, with an anticipated entry of over 1,100 crews, is first up. This is followed a week later by the Home International Regatta between Ireland, England, Scotland and Wales. The highlight of the festival will be the Coupe de la Jeunesse, which is a European junior tournament, with crews from 14 countries set to compete. All of this activity is taking place in Olympic or river style boats.

 Now there are two other rowing codes under the Rowing Ireland umbrella.

 In 2017 Rowing Ireland formed an Offshore Division. Offshore rowing or “FISA Coastal” rowing takes place in single, double and quad scull boats which are wider than Olympic boats and are self-bailing. The crews race a course with multiple turns around a single buoy where navigation is as important as pulling hard. The inaugural Irish Offshore Rowing Championships were held in Arklow in 2017. Over 20 crews competed in the FISA World Championships in France and they returned with a silver medal, taken by Monika Dukarska.

 Rowing Ireland also created a Coastal Division in 2017. Coastal rowing has a tradition going back centuries and was often associated with boats rowing out to arriving ships to obtain work. Competition in traditional wooden boats or coastal fours takes place in lanes, with crews rounding individual buoys before returning to the start/finish line. The inaugural  Irish Coastal Rowing Championships under the aegis of Rowing Ireland will take place in the National Rowing Centre in August on a separate part of the lake to the Olympic course.

 Rowing Ireland brought boats from all three codes together for the first time at the National Rowing Centre on Saturday, February 24th for the picture above.

Published in Rowing

Following yesterday’s AGM of the East Coast Rowing Council, the fixture list for their 2018 regatta season has been released. (Downloadable below). Crews of men, women, and children from Skerries in the north to Arklow in the south will compete for the individual regatta medals and trophies, for the championship league positions, and for the overall club shields. 

In a departure from tradition, which is that regattas are held on a Sunday unless there is a bank holiday, the fixture list includes a Saturday Regatta in June. It is relative newcomers Skerries Rowing Club, established in 2012, that have taken this bold move. Holding with tradition, the 140th Wicklow Regatta will be held on the August Bank Holiday Monday

Regattas are held on the ‘home’ courses of each club., on the bays, estuaries, and open water of the east coast of Ireland. All regattas feature races from Under 12s through to Senior Men and Senior Women, with 5-12 boats per race and up to 13 races spread over the afternoon.

Last year was a hugely busy and successful year on the East Coast, with the St. Michael’s Regatta in Dun Laoghaire falling just 2 crews short of the all-time record for entries, which was set at the 2017 Wicklow Regatta at 125 crews. In terms of results, the two Ringsend clubs managed to share the overall season’s spoils between them, with Stella Maris taking the Junior Shield, and St. Patrick’s taking both the Senior Shield and the Overall Shield.

Clubs can look forward to strong growth over the coming year, with new builds for 7 East Coast skiffs having been awarded grant aid in the 2017 round of Sports Capital Grants. With these boats being unique to Dublin and Wicklow, the growth of the fleet is a source of pride for all who row these fine boats.

Published in Coastal Rowing

The River Lee was filled with colour, excitement and drama with over 30 different types of boats all competing in Ocean to City – An Rás Mór on Saturday 10 June. Ireland’s premier coastal rowing race had to make a significant course change last week due to the high winds predicted for Saturday, and the resultant Sheltered River Race was a resounding success.

Joya Kuin, Festival Manager said, “We were all put to the test this year having to change the race route at such short notice to the Sheltered River Course, due to weather conditions. Luckily our team of volunteers and supporters all rose to the challenge and succeeded in delivering not just a safe event – but also one that was challenging, competitive and enjoyable for all our participants. The atmosphere was absolutely electric at the finish line and it was fantastic to see so many happy faces after the tough race.”

Blackrock Rowing Club Youth CrewBlackrock Rowing Club Youth Crew

Over 600 participants in 200 boats took to the water at Port of Cork to race a river route along the north shore to Blackrock Castle, and passing back on the southern shore along the Marina to the finish Line at Lapp’s Quay, with most boats doing two laps. Crews participated across a range of classes, from juniors to veteran participants; rowers and paddlers from all over Ireland, England, Wales, The Netherlands and the US. Competition was intense due to the confined space of the course, which added to the excitement and enjoyment for spectators and participants alike.

Boats at finish lineBoats at the Port of Cork finish line on the River Lee

Ocean to City – An Rás Mór, the flagship event of Cork Harbour Festival is organised by Meitheal Mara, the community boatyard, training centre and charity located in the heart of Cork City. The Festival is sponsored by Cork City Council, Cork County Council, Port of Cork, Failte Ireland and MaREI, and made possible with the help of dozens of Event Partners and hundreds of volunteers.

Female east coast racing skiff coming in to finish lineFemale east coast racing skiff coming in to finish lineFemale east coast racing skiff coming in to the finish line

Hamble River Rowing Club UKThe Hamble River Rowing Club from the UK

Meitheal Mara Challenge Cup Winners on An Doras DeargMeitheal Mara Challenge Cup Winners – An Doras Dearg

Port of Cork Ocean to CityThe Port of Cork Ocean to City Race

Team Relentless rowing LibertyThe Rowing Team Relentless

the Beardy Flies of Naomhoga ChorcaiThe Beardy Flies of Naomhoga Chorcai

Results for The Sheltered River Course 2017 – Ocean to City – An Rás Mor

2-hd Currachs (single lap) - 1st Prize: 100, Brandon, Siog
3-hd Currachs (single lap) - 1st Prize: 105, Meitheal, Bádoireacht | Meitheal Mara
3-hd Currachs (double lap) - 1st Prize: 8, West Clare Currach Club, Orca
4-hd Naomhóga - 1st Prize & Cían Ó Sé Memorial Trophy: 17, Naomhóga Chorcaí, NC Noamhóg Workshop
4-hd Naomhóga - 2nd Prize & Never Again Prize: 16, Naomhóga Chorcaí, Saints and Sinners
East Coast Racing Skiffs - 1st Prize: 27, Bray Rowing Club, Bri Chualann
East Coast Racing Skiffs - 1st Female Crew: 25, Dalkey Rowing Club, Dalkey/Leary
St Ayles Skiffs - 1st Prize: 33, Dundrum Coastal Rowing Club, Tonn Ruray
Thames Waterman Cutters - 1st Prize: 57, Port of London Authority, Plashers B (UK)
Celtic Longboats - 1st Prize & 1st Veteran: 70, Aberdyfi Rowing Club, Aberdyfi Mens (UK)
Celtic Longboats - 2nd Prize & 1st Mixed: 65, Madog Yacht Club, Mad Dogs On Speed (UK)
ICRF One-Designs - 1st Prize & 1st Veteran: 80, Templenoe Rowing Club, Unlimited
ICRF One-Design - 2nd Prize: 78, Passage West Rowing Club
ICRF One-Designs - 1st Female/Mixed: 72, Kilmacabea Rowing Club, Kilmacabea Record Breakers
Sliding-Seat Singles - 1st Prize: 50, Albert O'Sullivan-Greene, Castletownbere Rowing Club
Quad Sliding-Seat Boats - 1st Prize: 85, Bantry Rowing club
Dragon Boats - 1st Prize: 89, Kaag Dragons (The Netherlands)
Dragon Boats - 1st Breast Cancer Survivor Crew: 88, Suir Dragons & Nore Dragons
Boat Builder of the Day: 45, Martin Murphy, Passage West Rowing Club
Boat of the Day - Charlie Hennessy Cup: 92, ‘’Lily’’, Flesk Valley RC
Community Boat Build Prize: 28, St Michaels Rowing Club, St Michaels Mens Crew
Meitheal Mara Challenge Cup: 97, An Doras Dearg, Bádoireacht | Meitheal Mara
Most Unconventional Route Prize: 68, Madog Yacht Club, Mad Dogs On Tour (UK)
Special Endeavour Award: 108, Blackrock Rowing Club Junior Crew, Team Passage

SUP - 1st Prize - #372 - Dermot Twomey
Sit-on-top (single Lap), 1st Prize / 1st Veteran, #392 Chris Coady
Sit-on-top (single Lap) 2nd Prize / 2nd Veteran #561 Jonathan Foley
Sit-on-top (Single Lap) 3rd Prize / Veteran #523 John O’Mahony
Sit-on-top (Single Lap) 1st Female / 1st Veteran Female #504 Aine Nugent
Expedition Kayak (Single Lap) 1st Prize #537 Liam Holland
Expedition Kayak (Single Lap) 2nd Prize / 1st Veteran #534 Nigel Ducker
Expedition Kayak (Single Lap) 3rd Prize / 2nd Veteran #260 Robert Wilkes
Expedition Kayak (Single Lap) 3rd Veteran #205 Garrett Casey
Expedition Kayak (Single Lap) 1st Female #531 Tracey Coughlan
Double Kayak (Single Lap) 1st Prize #906 John Harrington
Expedition Kayak (Double Lap 1st Prize / 1st Veteran #326 Tomas Walsh
Expedition Kayak (Double Lap) 2nd Prize #315 Adam Kennedy
Expedition Kayak (Double Lap) 3rd Prize / 2nd Veteran #334 Chris McDaid
Expedition Kayak (Double Lap) 3rd Veteran #304 Paul Holland
Expedition Kayak (Double Lap) 1st Female #329 Heather Clarke
Expedition kayak (Double Lap) 2nd Female #299 Sinead Frawley
Unlimited Kayak (Double Lap) 1st Prize #348 Dermot Hudson
Unlimited kayak (Double Lap) 2nd Prize #357 Paul Russell
Unlimited Kayak (Double Lap) 3rd Prize #351 Jim Morrissey
Double Kayak (Double Lap) 1st Prize #904 Ronan O’Connor

Published in Coastal Rowing

Whitegate Rowing Club's Coastal Rowing Championship Regatta took place on Sunday in the scenic eastern side of Cork Harbour.

The one day fixture ran as part of as part of the Coastal Rowing Association (CRA) 2017 season of regattas.

More on the Whitegate Coastal Rowing Facebook page here

Whitegate coastal rowingThe scene at Whitegate Rowing Club as the coastal rowing championships get underway on Saturday. Photo: Bob Bateman

whitegate coastal rowing crew juniors.jpgThere was plenty of racing for both minors and seniors at Whitegate Photo: Bob Bateman

Published in Coastal Rowing

Irish crews were to the fore in last weekend's grueling 150km row across the Irish Sea from Arklow to Aberystwyth. The Vartry Rowing Club from Wicklow won both the overall Challenge Trophy and the Mens Race in just under 19 hours.

Dun Laoghaire's St Michael's Rowing Club won the ladies race in 26 hours in a determined and gutsy performance. The difficult conditions took its toll and only four out of the 13 starters finished with Dun Laoghaire's St Michael's Mixed team in their traditional timber skiff been unlucky to break their rudder just five miles from the finish.

Celtic rowing ChallengeThe St Michael's mixed team in the traditional skiff alongside the ladies team in the Celtic Challenge longboat

The ladies support boat, The Pamela, skippered by Eamonn and Alan Crosbie (National YC), was awarded the Spirit Of The Challenge trophy for sticking by the ladies all the way before heading straight back to Dun Laoghaire in a building breeze, eventually arriving home at 3am!

The next race takes place in 2019.

Published in Coastal Rowing
Tagged under

Irish Flying Fifteen National Champion Chris Doorly is back on the water early this season but before he takes up his usual role at the sharp end of a National Yacht Club keelboat he can be found, as shown in our exclusive photograph above, with a ladies crew from St Michael's Rowing Club in Dun Laoghaire Harbour. Doorly is training for the Celtic Challenge Irish Sea Rowing event which takes place from Arklow to Aberystwyth, Wales this coming Friday.

This test of endurance is 150km and can take 24 hours depending on weather. The club have a mens and womens crew consisting of three teams four who will operate a relay system.

The club are raising funds for both the RNLI and the upkeep of the local clubhouse which featured recently on Afloat.ie

Published in Coastal Rowing

Dun Laoghaire's St Michael's Rowing Club is participating in a Charity Irish Sea fundraising race for the RNLI over the May Bank holiday but one of its support RIBs has pulled-out. The club has put a shot-out for a replacement to Afloat.ie readers.

The RIB must be over 5.5 metres in length.

The club says it will cover associated fuel and crew costs. Full details in the poster above that is also downloadable below in a larger format.

Published in RIBs
Page 3 of 7

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020

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