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Displaying items by tag: Dublin Bay Sailing Club

With just over a week to go until Dubin Bay Sailing Club racing starts on June 8th, 116 boats turned out across  21 classes for race training on the bay on Saturday.

There were light easterly winds and another lovely sunny day on the water for the Dun Laoghaire Harbour fleets. 

Race Officer Barry MacNeaney on MacLir had a busy day, starting the ISORA fleet at 10 am before taking charge of DBSC's Blue/Red Fleet of 45 boats. This included Cr0 1, Cr1 9, B31.7 9, CR2 6, Cr3 5, Cr4&5 9, Shipman & Glen 6

Other fleets were:

Green fleet 47 boats: RO Barry O’Neill on Freebird: SB20 7, FF 15, Sportsboat & Dragon 5, Ruffian 7, B211 9, Squibs & Mermaids 4

Dinghies: RO Barbara Conway on the Spirit of the Irish Committee Boat - 24 boats - PY 8, Laser 16 over two starts

DBSC has also been reporting strong turnouts for training last week as follows: 

Tues dinghies: RO Suzanne McGarry on Freebird - approx 24 over 3 starts, mostly Lasers

Wed Wags: RO Harry Gallagher on MacLir 15 boats

Thurs Blue Fleet: RO Ed Totterdell on MacLir 38 boats Cr0 2, Cr1 7, B31.7 9, Cr2 3, Cr3 9, Cr4&5 8

Thurs Red Fleet: RO Brian Mathews 44 boats SB20 4, Sportsboats&Dragon 4, FF 15, Ruffian 7, Shipmans 5, B211 6, Squibs&Mermaids 3, no Glens

Published in DBSC

The second Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) Saturday race training day attracted a fine fleet of 126 boats, forty more than last Saturday as the country's biggest yacht racing club prepares to resume competition from June 7th. 

The fleets training today were:

  • Blue/Red fleets combined - RO Ed Totterdell aboard MacLir - 1 training race
    Total of 50 boats:
    Cr0 - 5, Cr 1 - 10, Cr 2 - 4, B31.7 - 7, Cr4+5 11, Shipman - 5, Glen - 0
  • Green fleet = RO Barry O'Neill aboard Freebird - 2 training races
    Total of 43 boats:
    SB20 - 7, FF - 15, Sportsboats+Dragons - 6, Ruffians - 5, B211 - 6, Squibs+Mermaids - 4
  • Dinghies - RO Suzanne McGarry aboard Spirit of the Irish - 2 training races
    Total of 33 dinghies inside the harbour:
    PY+IDRA 14+Fireball - 8, Lasers - 25 (2 4.7s, 6 standard rig, 17 Radial rig - split over 3 starts with max 15 in any start)

Winds were generally a bit lighter and shiftier in the north western end of the bay where the cruisers course was set and as a result, only one race was sailed.

Barry O'Neill and his Green fleet race management team got two great windward/leeward training races starting in the vicinity of the East mark. The wind died after the first training race and went down to just three knots, so Barry waited for about 15 minutes for the wind to fill in and then a second training race began in about 12-15 knots. 

The past week has seen the start of the full programme of the DBSC training mini-series.

Last Tuesday DBSC dinghies had approximately 36 boats on the water. Race Officer Suzanne McGarry aboard Freebird persevered to get a course laid in very shifty conditions and got one training race in which was thoroughly enjoyed by all.

On Wednesday the Water Wags had perfect conditions for RO Harry Gallagher aboard MacLir with 15 boats taking part in the training race inside the harbour as WM Nixon reported here

Thursday keelboat racing was cancelled due to weather.

Published in DBSC

Plans for Dublin Bay Sailing Club's (DBSC) 'training' mini-series starting this Saturday are advancing with the country's largest yacht racing club updating members this week. 

The vintage Water Wags, one of the club's strongest dinghy classes, have now confirmed that they will also take part in the race training mini-series. 

As Afloat previously reported, DBSC Keelboat race-training will take place on Saturdays and Thursdays with a full programme to include regular Tuesdays night racing beginning when full competition resumes on June 7th. 

The Water Wag class will take part in the race training mini-seriesThe Water Wag class will take part in the race training mini-series

Race Training between Saturday 15th May and 7th June

  • Keelboat fleets on Thursdays and Saturdays only
  • Dinghy Fleets on Tuesdays and Saturdays
  • Water Wags on Wednesdays

As this series is designed to train crews, DBSC will use its regular Sailing Instructions to allow 'training for racing to be as realistic as possible'.

Some Classes may have to be capped or split as guidelines only allow for 15 boats to race train from each class or in each race training start.

Where possible, some classes may have to be split and joined with another class in order to meet the quota. To ensure these requirements are met, DBSC will be contacting some Class Captains to ask for their assistance in ensuring they are covid compliant.

Training is being provided for our Race Management Personnel who are working under COVID compliant conditions which calls for restricted numbers on committee boatsTraining is being provided for our Race Management Personnel who are working under COVID compliant conditions which calls for restricted numbers on committee boats

DBSC is working hard to ensure all those who have entered in time and expressed interest in participating in race training will be facilitated.  However, if sailors or boats decide of their own accord to go out without having registered with DBSC their intention and there is more than the prescribed number of boats on the line, race training will be delayed with an AP Flag or may have to be abandoned for that day.

DBSC Specific Instructions for the Training Mini-Series

Covid Compliance

1.1 All Skippers shall enforce Covid Compliance within their POD

1.2 Dinghies must be able to right a capsize without assistance

1.3 Boats without engines must be able to return to shore without assistance

1.4 There should be no gathering ashore outside a boats POD

1.5 Should more than 45 Dinghies present for training all training for that day may be abandoned

1.6 Sailors must follow the Covid guidelines of the club. marina or slip they launch from and take personal responsibility for the safety of themselves and others while launching.

2 Start Limits

2.1 There will be no more than 15 boats on a start line. All boats not within their warning signal must keep clear of starting line to ensure the integrity of the POD system

2.2 Should more than 15 boats appear at the start racing for that class may be abandoned

2.3 it may be necessary to adjust start times and fleet make up to ensure there are no more than 15 boats per start. This will be notified by email and on the DBSC Web Site.

3 Training Outcome measurement

3.1 All boats will be given a finish place and handicapped classes will also be given a finish time

3.2 Outcomes may not be posted after each day but will be posted at the end of the series for sailors to evaluate their improvement

Published in DBSC

Long-awaited race 'training' gets underway on Dublin Bay in ten days time thanks to Dublin Bay Sailing Club that has announced a May Mini-Series this evening.

In line with government guidelines, DBSC will run a Mini-Series this month in order for crews and DBSC race management teams to train and to get ready for the racing season.

The Mini-Series will run on the regular DBSC Race nights of Tuesdays, Thursday and Saturdays. Preference for the Water Wags dinghies that race on Wednesday evenings at Dun Laoghaire Harbour are not yet established. 

DBSC says "Sailing is now considered a safe, non-contact sport with no material difference between training and competition". The club also says "As we have not been granted approval for full competition this series will run for three weeks or until DBSC is given approval to start its AIB DBSC summer series". 

Covid compliant

This series will be Covid compliant and DBSC requests that all participants remember that there should be no group gatherings after each day's programme.

"Sailing is now considered a safe, non-contact sport with no material difference between training and competition" 

DBSC Committee vessels will run in a pod system and all participants should also ensure their boats are organised in pods. All boats should be equipped with hand sanitiser and be Covid aware.

DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan at the Club's 'Asgard' race mark on Dublin Bay DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan at the Club's 'Asgard' race mark on Dublin Bay

DBSC Committee Boat teams will undergo training. ROs and Timers will apply RRS 2021-24 and times will be taken. However, we will not be posting the times of boats after each training day, but they will be made available at the end of the mini-series.

As Afloat reported previously, the focus for this series is on warm-ups and crew training after a long absence from sailing.

Some boats may not be able to participate due to lack of pods or other reasons, therefore, performance times will not count for overall points in the subsequent AIB DBSC racing summer series

Registered members

This mini-series will commence on Saturday 15th May and is open to all current registered DBSC Members who opt-in using the DBSC survey sent by email. Please note that in order to ensure compliance, there may be a need to cap some classes. Should there be more entries than can be catered for, entries will be accepted in the order of registration for DBSC 2021 season

Start Times & Fleet Composition

Start times and fleet make up will be decided on Friday 7th May, on the basis of entries and with Covid compliance paramount. Race times for this mini-series will be issued after Friday 7th May. The intention is that, if possible, Course card 2 as received will apply for normal AIB DBSC Summer series, as soon as this is permitted.

Note under Irish Sailing guidelines dinghies must be able to self right without assistance and non – powered boats must be able to return to the dock without assistance.

Published in DBSC

139 yachts and dinghies are now signed up for the Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) Summer Season.

Following the Government announcement of the easing of COVID-19 restrictions, the club is expecting to hear news of when club training and racing can start this week.

The country's biggest sailing league on Dublin Bay had been targeting a return on May 4th. While this is not confirmed, DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan told Afloat the club is awaiting "guidance" but "would be hopeful for a return to our full racing programme pretty soon". 

As sailing has been described as a low-risk outdoor no-contact sport with little difference in the sport between training and competition modes, more clarity has been requested on the resumption date for yacht racing currently given as June 7th.

Racing in DBSC's summer series on Dublin BayRacing in DBSC's summer series on Dublin Bay

DBSC's Hon Sec Chris Moore said the club expected to "receive confirmation of a start date on Tuesday" (May 3rd). 

Meanwhile, DBSC has laid its marks, prepared courses and made arrangements for an immediate start to its AIB sponsored season that traditionally begins in the last week of April for a fleet of up to 200 boats and 1200 sailors on the capital's waters. "We're ready to go whenever", Kirwan said.

Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club (DBSC) has introduced a new cruiser Four Non-Spinnaker Open Class for the 2021 season.

"The new class is In response to the increasing demand for short-handed and non-spinnaker cruiser racing as reported in a number of recent articles in Afloat", according to DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan.

This new class initiative is for those who want competitive performance racing without the use of Spinnakers, Gennakers and Bloopers. It will suit those who like sailing short-handed or even fully crewed and want the fun of racing without the need to handle spinnakers etc.

Significantly, furling headsails – often a bone of contention in white sails racing – will not be mandatory.

DBSC's existing Cruisers 5 class will continue to be a separate class racing under their White Sails Class rules that mandate furling headsails.

Boats with a valid ECHO handicap cert, and/or a non-spinnaker IRC TCF of .820 or above and who conform to the DBSC Cruisers 4 Non-Spinnaker class rules shall be eligible to apply for entry.

A final decision on entry will be under the direction of the DBSC Committee.

Boats for the new DBSC class four must be monohull, with a minimum of 2 sleeping bunks, internal seating accommodation for 4 persons. In addition, they must have an inboard engine, at least one head and a cooker.Boats for the new DBSC class four must be monohull, with a minimum of 2 sleeping bunks, internal seating accommodation for 4 persons. In addition, they must have an inboard engine, at least one head and a cooker

The rules for the new class are below. 

DBSC Cruisers 4 Non-Spinnaker Open Class:

  • Boats with a valid ECHO handicap cert, and/or a non-spinnaker IRC TCF of .820 or above and who conform to the DBSC Cruisers 4 Non-Spinnaker class rules shall be eligible to apply for entry. The final decision on entry will be under the direction of the DBSC Committee
  • Boats must be monohull, with a minimum of 2 sleeping bunks, internal seating accommodation for 4 persons. In addition, they must have an inboard engine, at least one head and a cooker.
  • Boats shall display the Numeral Pennant “4” on their backstay.
  • Boats who wish to race under ECHO and/or IRC handicap shall have a current valid certificate. New entrants to the class may be given an initial loading of up to 10% on their ECHO handicap.
  • Only a single headsail shall be used while racing.
  • Sail identification number on mainsail is required.
  • Spinnakers, Bloopers, Gennakers, Code Zero or similar sails are not allowed.
  • Whisker or spinnaker poles are allowed for headsails.
Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club Commodore Ann Kirwan says the club aims to start its 2021 summer race series in mid-May despite the lack of clear guidance for the sport following last night's cautious easing of lockdown restrictions by the Government. 

This means the country's largest yacht racing club will start approximately three weeks later than its normal start date at the end of April.

As Afloat previously reported, DBSC has confirmed plans for the 2021 season despite its Winter and Spring racing hiatus and preparations are now well underway.

The club runs year-round racing for up to 300 yachts and dinghies in over 20 different classes.

Kirwan told Afloat, "Despite the lack of clarity in the Government announcement, DBSC is still hopeful that we may begin our season in some form before mid-May". 

Dublin Bay Sailing Club Commodore Ann KirwanDublin Bay Sailing Club Commodore Ann Kirwan

“A lot of work has to be done behind the scenes to provide the standard of racing everyone knows and expects,” Rear Commodore Jacqueline McStay says.

“The racing sub-committee is preparing the courses, whilst committee member Philip Ferguson with the help of Chris Moore is checking and working on the marks so they are ready to be deployed in the bay by mid-April.”

Entries for the country's biggest sailing league are materialising with Cruisers Five fleet receiving the biggest early entry for the AIB-sponsored Summer Series.

The Government has announced the phased easing of some Covid-19 restrictions during the month of April.

They plan to continue this cautious approach, gradually easing restrictions, while a substantial level of the population are vaccinated during April, May and June, after which, it should be safe to reopen society more widely.

The Taoiseach said from April 19 some additional high-performance training will be allowed, including senior inter-county GAA training to facilitate national league competitions starting in May.

He said training for high performing athletes approved by Sport Ireland will also be allowed. 

Mr Martin said from April 26 outdoor sports training for under 18s can begin again.

He said golf and outdoor tennis can be played and there will be a return to 'distanced sport' but it is still unclear as to what interpretation is being given to sailing.

Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club's Cruisers Five fleet has the biggest early entry for 2021’s AIB-sponsored Summer Series due to start next month. 

Entries for the country's biggest sailing league are materialising even though there is no clarity yet on the scheduled April 25th start date due to current lockdown restrictions.

Division Five also known as the 'White Sails' or the 'Non-Spinnaker' category have 12 entries received so far (from a possible 29 of previous years) for summer racing for prizes that include the Burford Trophy for the best performance on IRC on Thursday night racing, typically the biggest DBSC turnout of the week.

Popular J109s race in DBSC Cruisers One division Photo: AfloatPopular J109s race in DBSC Cruisers One division Photo: Afloat

The White Sails have the most entries of the IRC divisions so far with the hotly contested Cruisers One division with nine entries in.

In the one designs, Six Beneteau 211s are entered and five Flying Fifteens

Although it had a massive entry of 65 boats in 2020 and another big entry is expected again, so far there are only three single-handed Laser dinghies signed up.

All the entries can be viewed live on the DBSC site here

Glen keelboats are among DBSC's 20 classes preparing for the 2021 season Photo: AfloatGlen keelboats are among DBSC's 20 classes preparing for the 2021 season Photo: Afloat

DBSC has confirmed plans for the 2021 season despite its Winter and Spring racing hiatus with preparations well underway for April “A lot of work has to be done behind the scenes to provide the standard of racing everyone knows and expects,” Rear Commodore Jacqueline McStay says.

“The racing sub-committee is preparing the courses, whilst committee member Philip Ferguson with the help of Chris Moore is checking and working on the marks so they are ready to be deployed in the bay by mid-April.”

“We are working to ensure we are ready for the off!”, McStay says.

Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club's (DBSC) 18-boat Cruiser Two fleet has elected a new Class Captain for its 2021 season following its online AGM this week.

The DBSC Cruiser 2/Sigma33 AGM was held via ViCo on 04.02.2021. The current Class Captain, Lindsay J. Casey, welcomed all attendees and gave a brief review of the DBSC 2020 Summer Season noting that the class had been fortunate to have Dublin Bay racing in the period July – September 2020.

The DBSC Cruisers Two fleet comprises a mix of popular yacht designs including Sigma 33s, Corby 26s, X99s, and J97s among others. 

Lindsay congratulated DBSC for the expertise and dedication of their volunteers in organising racing in such difficult and uncertain circumstances. Despite the relatively short season, it was enjoyed and appreciated by all who participated. He thanked the Race officers and all the volunteers on Mac Lir.

Windjammer J97The DBSC Cruisers Two (2597) Windjammer (Lindsay J. Casey/ Denis Power) from the RStGYC Photo: Afloat

Lindsay also advised that he was standing down as Class Captain. He welcomed the newly elected Class Captain, Frank Cleere, wishing him every success. Frank is a very keen yachtsman with approximately 20 year's sailing experience since he started sailing when he was 9 years old. He has had considerable experience racing in Cruisers 2 as a member of the J97 Windjammer team since 2017 and previously with Bendemeer from 2009. He also has experience in DBSC Cruisers 1; DBSC Sportboat fleet; 1720 campaigns; three very successful Round Ireland campaigns; and five consecutive years winning ISORA IRC Class 2.

Commenting on his election, Frank said “I am delighted and honoured to be elected the Cruiser 2/Sigma 33 Class Captain. I’d like to thank the outgoing Class Captain for maintaining a firm hand on the tiller. I’m looking forward to what will hopefully be an exciting, enjoyable, competitive and safe DBSC 2021 Summer Season with more time on the water when compared with the 2020 Season. Liaising with DBSC is an important aspect of a class captain’s brief and will continue with what has been a very successful dialogue to date.”

Published in DBSC

Dublin Bay Sailing Club's recognition today as the Mitsubishi Motors "Sailing Club of the Year" 2021 on the strength of achieving a remarkably full programme in 2020 when Pandemic Regulations permitted is well merited. Yet it's only the second time that the unique Dun Laoghaire umbrella organisation has received this supreme accolade. Not surprisingly, the Royal Cork Yacht Club – the world's premier club - has been the holder seven times: in 1987, 1992, 1997, 2000, 2006, 2015 and 2020. But the fact that this is only the second time that DBSC has won does not reflect the reality that the club is almost always on the shortlist. And the circumstance of its previous time as holder in 2007 well illustrate why DBSC has successfully been with us for so long through times good and bad. 

Outlander PHEV 211 Offer Afloat.ie 847x180px

For in 2006 – the year for which it actually last won the trophy - DBSC had a real problem of success. Sailing numbers in Dublin Bay were expanding at an unprecedented rate with the new Dun Laoghaire marina in place, while the Celtic Tiger was roaring with economic growth. Under Commodore Tim Costello and Honorary Secretary Donal O'Sullivan, DBSC had to upgrade its services while stream-lining its functioning in a massive voluntary effort, and it did so with such success that the "Club of the Year" accolade made for the perfect fit, helped by the fact that the Commodore's Mills 40 Tiamat, with an all-Dun Laoghaire crew including Brendan Foley on the helm, had won the British Open IRC Championship in Cowes.

At the presentation of the Mitsubishi Motors Sailing Club of the Year 2007 award to Dublin Bay Sailing Club in Dublin Port Centre were (left to right, Enda Connellan (CEO Dublin Port, sponsors of the DBSC programme), Tim Costello (Commodore, DBSC), and Frank Keane, Chairman of Mitsubishi MotorsAt the presentation of the Mitsubishi Motors Sailing Club of the Year 2007 award to Dublin Bay Sailing Club in Dublin Port Centre were (left to right, Enda Connellan (CEO Dublin Port, sponsors of the DBSC programme), Tim Costello (Commodore, DBSC), and Frank Keane, Chairman of Mitsubishi Motors

Having dealt successfully with the hazards of the exceptionally good times back in 2006, fourteen years later DBSC has handled exceptionally bad times with the same calm competence. For the Club has had to deal with the circumstances afloat and ashore in 2020 which - in 2006 - would have been laughed out of court if they had been proposed as the nightmare scenario for some sort of very sick future fantasy horror drama.

Yet it has come to pass. But the club has braced itself, re-thought its functioning, and implemented emergency measures such that Dun Laoghaire has come out of 2020 with a sense that, within the inevitable pandemic boundaries, Dublin Bay SC provided its members and service-users with as much sailing as was reasonably possible in pandemic circumstances

The background to the club gives us some idea of how it finds a hidden strength when the need arises. Although DBSC at its foundation 137 years ago in 1884 was undoubtedly what would now be called a disruptor start-up, today it is effectively the quietly powerful sailing government for the vast majority of the competitive sailors in the most numerous fleet based in one place in Ireland.

In an exceptionally difficult year for all sports, the performance of Dublin Bay Sailing Club in providing a viable racing programme in 2020 for a large and varied fleet pf 22 classes drawn from all four of Dun Laoghaire Harbour's bricks-and-mortar Yacht Clubs is a remarkable achievement. DBSC's emergence with a complete set of end-of-season results – albeit after a pandemic-truncated season – was an outstanding performance by any standards, and they are clear ahead in being acclaimed as the 2021 holders of the Mitsubishi Motors "Sailing Club of the Year" trophy.

DBSC's only "premises" consist of the Race Management Hut on the West Pier, but in 2020's special circumstances, it was kept in store and not commissioned……….DBSC's only "premises" consist of the Race Management Hut on the West Pier, but in 2020's special circumstances, it was kept in store and not commissioned……….

……while all racing was started and finished from Committee Boats whose crews had been isolated in pods.  Photo: Afloat.ie……while all racing was started and finished from Committee Boats whose crews had been isolated in pods. Photo: Afloat.ie

Mitsubishi Motors are Irish sailing's most committed longterm sponsors, as they've supported the "Sailing Club of the Year" accolade for 35 years. This unique and informal competition was first inaugurated in 1979 and initially only covered Leinster, but after Mitsubishi Motors had become the enthusiastic sponsors in 1986, it went nationwide and the title of "Irish Sailing Club of the
Year" became one of real prestige, based on a rigorous set of standards.

An underlying purpose of the award is to highlight and honour the voluntary effort which goes into creating and maintaining the unrivalled quality of Ireland's yacht and sailing clubs, and the dedication of their members.

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In making their assessment, the adjudicators take many factors into consideration. In addition to the obvious one of sailing success at local, national and international levels, considerable attention is also paid to the satisfaction which members in every branch of sailing and boating feel with the way their club is run, and how effectively it meets their specific needs, while also encouraging sailing development and training at all ages.

In the four decades through which this informal comparison between sailing clubs has been running, the basic expectations have been continually refined to reflect a changing sailing world in changing national and global circumstances, a developing adjudication situation to which the Commodores of the winning clubs have made a really worthwhile contribution over the years, with thoughtful acceptance speeches in which they've outlined their visions for their clubs, and their role in the local community and in all aspects of sailing.

DBSC's racing programme is so accessible and popular that it attracts regular participation by boats which would be seen elsewhere purely as cruisers, such as the Nich 31 Saki.  Photo: Afloat.ie/David O'BrienDBSC's racing programme is so accessible and popular that it attracts regular participation by boats which would be seen elsewhere purely as cruisers, such as the Nich 31 Saki. Photo: Afloat.ie/David O'Brien

Few other clubs have a sense of communal interaction as strong as DBSC. The change from disruptor to central body had come about as early as the mid 1890s, when it was realised that if an impartial unaligned organisation such as DBSC didn't already exist to administer the routine Dublin Bay sailing summer season, then they'd have to go through all the hassle of inventing something very like it.

For sure, with Dun Laoghaire Harbour providing the nautical focal point for a large, generally affluent, and often innovation-providing community, new ideas tend to arise on a regular basis as to how sailing in general, and racing in particular, might be re-configured for the sport's improvement.

But equally, that same south Dublin population is notably settled in its outlook, and for many, the continuation of the proven ways, with only carefully moderated change from time to time, is the only method for maintainable progress.

Thus Dublin Bay and Howth to the northeast provide the boat-minded communities and sailing waters where One-Design classes thrive as active fleets for much longer than anywhere else, so much so that the world's first One-Design class - the Dublin Bay Water Wags of 1887 – now prospers more than ever, with new-built boats regularly joining the fleet.

The Dublin Bay Water Wags were achieving the best One-design turnouts in 2020's shortened season.  Photo: Con MurphyThe Dublin Bay Water Wags were achieving the best local One-design turnouts in 2020’s shortened season. The Lasers were the most numerous class, with 91 entered, of which 53 were Laser Radials. Photo: Con Murphy

In such circumstances, getting a now instinctively conservative behemoth such as DBSC – with its racing for 22 classes - to implement a rapid and significant adjustment to its way of doing things is – as current DBSC Honorary Secretary and former Commodore Chris Moore has remarked – not unlike expecting a sudden change of course in a supertanker, where in normal circumstances any alteration of the rudder setting needs six miles of continued straight line progress before any change of course becomes perceptible.

DBSC Honorary Secretary Chris Moore on his J/109 Powder Monkey. In addition to his current role, he has served as Commodore of DBSC, and also as Commodore of the National YC.DBSC Honorary Secretary Chris Moore on his J/109 Powder Monkey. In addition to his current role, he has served as Commodore of DBSC, and also as Commodore of the National YC.

But like any alert organisation, back in the early days of 2020 while DBSC Commodore Jonathan Nicholson and his team were looking forward to the proper celebration of a new sponsorship deal with AIB, they were also prudently noting that as the pandemic developed, the most switched-on organisations such as the big tech companies in Dublin were talking of limiting office access until the summer of 2021, which was way beyond official predictions. Another factor which reinforced their realisation of the severity of the approaching shutdown was the postponement of the launching of the latest James Bond movie

These may seem off-the-wall indicators in the running of a sailing club, but DBSC's intensely urban location meant that every piece of possible useful information had to be taken into account while working out just when it was possible they might get a realistic programme under way, and how best it might be done.

Jonathan Nicholson, DBSC Commodore 2019-2020, found himself in one of the hottest seats in Irish sailing. Jonathan Nicholson, DBSC Commodore 2019-2020, found himself in one of the hottest seats in Irish sailing.

It was soon realised that the seasonal installation of the Race Officer's hut on the West Pier – used mainly for finishing races – was out of bounds as it's a gregarious focal point, and so the only way forward was the creation of pods to crew the club's Committee Boats, which would now both start and finish all races.

Thus an even greater effort and commitment was required from Committee Boat Volunteers, and in our feature about Ann Kirwan succeeding Jonathan Nicholson as Commodore on December 7th, the names of the leading volunteers who made this possible were listed.

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Yet all the time the developing situation had to be monitored in order to maximize sailing and minimise risk while at the same time instilling an awareness in sailors that when the inevitable second save began to show on the horizon, the sailors would have to accept a sudden stop to their activities with good grace.

Newly-elected DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan at the helm of the Ruffian 23 bandit, which she shares with Brian Cullen and Ciara BrownNewly-elected DBSC Commodore Ann Kirwan at the helm of the Ruffian 23 bandit, which she shares with Brian Cullen and Ciara Brown

It was good while it lasted, with best turnouts pushing towards the 150 boat mark, while the Water Wags were the best One-Designs with 23 boats, reflecting the fact that although some people were determined to get racing if at all possible, equally they'd to respect those who felt the best way to see the pandemic out was to give sailing a miss for 2020.

Those who did go sailing found their enjoyment enhanced through the DBSC programme, and the mood of it was best captured aboard Jimmy Fischer's Billy Whizz in the Beneteau 211 Class, which swept the board in the trophy department with their haul including the supreme award, the George Arthur Newsom Cup.

Small boats, big prize haul – the increasingly popular Beneteau 211s saw their champion, Jimmy Fischer's Billy Whizz, take DBSC's supreme prize in 2020.   Photo: Afloat.ie/David O'Brien    Small boats, big prize haul – the increasingly popular Beneteau 211s saw their champion, Jimmy Fischer's Billy Whizz, take DBSC's supreme prize in 2020. Photo: Afloat.ie/David O'Brien

The Cup is awarded to the boat which performs best compared to all One Design classes in Dublin Bay, and the way Billy Whizz is organised well illustrates the strong attraction of DBSC sailing, for although most of the participants are from the immediate South Dublin area, there are boats like Billy Whizz which find they can successfully cast the net wider.

Their unrivalled trophy haul included:

  • The George Arthur Newsom Cup - for the most successful boat in one-design racing
  • The Facet Jewellers Cup - for Thursdays scratch overall
  • The Beneteau 21 Tray - for Thursdays ECHO overall
  • The Beneteau Cup - for Saturdays scratch overall

The feat was achieved by Jimmy with two different crews, one on Thursdays comprising Joe Smyth, Annette Ni Murchu and her brother Brian Murphy. Not only did they win Thursdays on scratch, but they managed the rare feat of winning Thursdays on ECHO also. Joe, Annette and Brian are all longterm members of Blessington Sailing Club.

Sailing with Jimmy on Saturdays, Peter Duggan and Les Richards won the series on scratch. Peter is another graduate of Blessington Sailing Club, and has foredeck experience on the J/109 Jalapeño with Paul Barrington et al from the National YC, while Les is a partner in a Trapper 501 in Bray Sailing Club.

In all, a diverse crew lineup which shows that, fourteen years after getting the recipe exactly right to provide the best of sailing in exceptionally good times, Dublin Bay Sailing Club has been equally adept in getting the recipe exactly right to provide the best of sailing in exceptionally bad times, providing us with a worthy new addition to the Mitsubishi Motors Club of the Year listings:

  • 1979 Wicklow SC
  • 1980 Malahide YC
  • 198l National YC
  • 1982 Howth YC
  • 1983 Royal St George YC
  • 1984 Dundalk SC
  • 1985 National YC
  • (Sponsorship by Mitsubishi Motors began in 1985-86)
  • 1986 Howth YC
  • 1987 Royal Cork YC
  • 1988 Dublin University SC
  • 1989 Irish Cr. C
  • 1990 Glenans Irish SC
  • 1991 Galway Bay SC
  • 1992 Royal Cork YC
  • 1993 Cumann Badoiri Naomh Bhreannain (Dingle) & National YC
  • (after 1993, year indicated is one in which trophy is held)
  • 1995 Howth Yacht Club
  • 1996 National Yacht Club
  • 1997 Royal Cork Yacht Club
  • 1998 Kinsale Yacht Club
  • 1999 Poolbeg Yacht & Boat Club
  • 2000 Royal Cork Yacht Club
  • (in 2000, competition extended to include class associations and specialist organisations)
  • 2001 Howth Sailing Club Seventeen Footer Association
  • 2002 Galway Bay Sailing Club
  • 2003 Coiste an Asgard
  • 2004 Royal St George Yacht Club
  • 2005 Lough Derg Yacht Club
  • 2006 Royal Cork Yacht Club (Water Club of the Harbour of Cork)
  • 2007 Dublin Bay Sailing Club
  • 2008 Lough Ree YC & Shannon One Design Assoc.
  • 2009 Howth Yacht Club
  • 2010 Royal St George YC
  • 2011 Irish Cruiser Racing Association
  • 2012 National Yacht Club
  • 2013 Royal St George YC
  • 2014 Kinsale YC
  • 2015 Royal Cork Yacht Club
  • 2016 Royal Irish Yacht Club
  • 2017 Wicklow Sailing Club
  • 2018 National Yacht Club
  • 2019 Howth Yacht Club
  • 2020 Royal Cork Yacht Club
  • 2021 Dublin Bay Sailing Club

Click the link to read more on the Mitsubishi Motors 'Sailing Club of the Year' Award on Afloat's dedicated page 

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Page 9 of 60

Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020