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Displaying items by tag: Dun Laoghaire Harbour

For generations, women have saved lives, launched lifeboats, and raised millions for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI). At Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI, seven women are continuing this lifesaving legacy.

As an example of women saving lives, last July an all-female lifeboat crew from Dun Laoghaire RNLI rescued four teenagers after they were overcome by the outgoing tide and found clinging to The Wooden Bridge at Dollymount. The crew launched the inshore lifeboat at 5.08 pm and arrived on scene at 5.25 pm. The lifeboat was helmed by Laura Jackson with crew members Moselle Hogan and Hazel Rea onboard. The crew brough all four casualties safely ashore.

54 years since the first woman qualified as an RNLI crew member, women make up around 12.3% of the RNLI’s volunteer lifeboat crew, a steadily growing figure.

Helm Laura Jackson said: ‘International Women's Day is all about girl power, but we are one crew and everyone is equal regardless of what role they do for the wider Dun Laoghaire RNLI team – it doesn’t matter if you are female or male, we are all working together to save lives and keep people safe.

Laura said: ‘If we can inspire other women and girls to think that this is something they can do too, then that is a bonus.

‘To anyone thinking about joining the RNLI, just give it a go. Even if you haven’t got any background on the water or don’t know your way around a boat, there are roles for everyone, and the training and support is comprehensive.’

Sue Kingswood, RNLI Inclusion and Diversity Manager said: ‘Creating an inclusive culture which supports diversity is key to our long-term sustainability. So, we’re working hard to make sure that a wide range of people see the RNLI as a charity where they’re welcome as volunteers, supporters, or staff.

‘As we approach our 200th anniversary, women are now more evident in operational search and rescue (SAR) roles throughout the RNLI than they have ever been before. They are also better represented across operational management and in SAR training roles, which is great to see.

‘However, we still have a long way to go to achieve the representation we would like, not only where women are concerned, but across a much broader spectrum of diversity too.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Dun Laoghaire is set to host more than 90 cruise liner visits between April and October this year as the harbour publishes its cruise schedule for the 2023 season.

Beginning with the Viking Venus on 5 April and closing out the season with the Norwegian Star on 20 October, the harbour has 92 visits booked for the season thus far (subject to change).

That figure represents a 40% increase on 2022’s cruise call numbers, when 65 visits were on the books.

Some of these will be repeat visitors — with the Norwegian Dawn slated for and exceptionally busy season with 13 calls from May to October.

“We are all looking forward to a very busy cruise season,” Dun Laoghaire Harbour Master Capt Harry Duggan says.

Published in Cruise Liners
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The volunteer inshore lifeboat crew at Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI have had a busy weekend with two callouts. The first call came on Saturday (11 February) at 12.30 pm for a man and his dog, who had become cut off by the tide at Sandymount and the second, this morning (Sunday 12 February), at 8.21 am was to a man who had injured himself falling on rocks at Poolbeg.

The lifeboat callout to the dog walker in Sandymount yesterday, follows on from a similar callout to a woman and her dog two weeks ago, in the same location. In this case, the man had become cut off from the shore when his dog had run into the water and he was retrieving him. The tide came in very fast and he became trapped on a sandbank with his clothing soaked up to chest level. The alarm was raised and the inshore lifeboat crew from Dun Laoghaire RNLI responded. A crew member left the lifeboat and made their way to the man and his dog, where he checked their condition. They were then taken onboard the lifeboat and brought to shore, where they were met by members of Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard.

Commenting on the callout, Dun Laoghaire RNLI Helm, Laura Jackson said, ‘This was a very fast launch for the volunteer lifeboat crew and we were on the water within five minutes of our pagers being activated. What catches many people out who walk in this area, is just how fast the tide comes in and also, that it approaches from behind. You can get into difficulty so quickly and when you look up, you are surrounded by water and unsure of the depth. It can be quite disorientating.’

The second callout also involved members of Dublin Fire Service, who were on scene with a member of the public who had fallen on rocks at Poolbeg. The lifeboat crew were called out as access to the casualty was only possible by water, due to their location on the rocks. Working closely with members of Dublin Fire Service, Dun Laoghaire RNLI were able to assist with the transfer of the casualty from the rocks to Dublin Fire Service’s rescue craft. From there, they were brought to a nearby slipway, to receive further medical attention.

Dun Laoghaire RNLI Helm Laura Jackson further added, ‘It’s been a busy weekend for our inshore lifeboat crew at Dun Laoghaire with two very different callouts. We train for anything and it is always good to work alongside our colleagues in the other services, in this case, Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard and the Dublin Fire Service. We hope both casualties and our four legged one recover well from the incidents.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

At noon this Christmas Eve at the end of the East Pier in Dun Laoghaire, Dublin, RNLI volunteer lifeboat crew will gather to lay wreaths at sea and remember 15 of their lifeboat colleagues who were lost while on service in gale force conditions to the SS Palme that had run aground off Blackrock, back in 1895.

The annual ceremony, which has become a Christmas Eve tradition for the station, also remembers all those who have drowned around our coasts, in rivers, inland waters and abroad.

The ceremony will see lifeboat crew joined by members of the Dun Laoghaire Coast Guard and Civil Defence, who will form an honour guard. Both Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s inshore and all-weather lifeboat will launch, and the crew will lay wreaths off the east pier in view of the public. This year broadcaster, PJ Gallagher, will read an account of the disaster, published at the time of the tragedy.

Joe O’Donnell of ‘Wedding Pipers’ will play a lament from the Lighthouse Battery and musician, William Byrne, will perform the ‘Ballad of the Palme.’

On 24 December 1895, the 'Civil Service No. 1' Dun Laoghaire lifeboat was wrecked while proceeding to the assistance of the SS Palme of Finland. The entire crew, 15 in total, were drowned. The lifeboat capsized 600 yards from the distressed vessel and, although every effort was made to send help to the lifeboat and to the Palme, nothing could be done.

The second Dun Laoghaire lifeboat 'Hannah Pickard' also launched but it too capsized under sail, fortunately, all crew returned safely. The Captain, his wife, child and 17 crew were eventually rescued on the 26th of December by the SS Tearaght.

The short ceremony takes place under the lighthouse at the end of the East Pier. It includes an ecumenical blessing, a reading from a news article published at the time and music.

Commenting on the event, Dun Laoghaire RNLI Lifeboat Operations Manager Ed Totterdell said, ‘The loss of fifteen lifeboat volunteers devastated the local community at the time but the RNLI here kept going. Volunteer lifeboat crew came forward then, as they still do, to help those in trouble at sea and on inland waters. We hold this ceremony to honour their memory but also to remember all those we have lost to drowning.’

‘Our lifeboat crew is on call this Christmas as they are every day of the year, and we hope everyone has a safe and peaceful time. We are also delighted to welcome back PJ Gallagher, who was a valued member of our crew when he lived in Dun Laoghaire and who remains a great friend of the lifeboat service in Ireland. People are very welcome to come and join us at the end of the East Pier, it’s our Christmas tradition and one that is very special to us.’

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Warm tributes were paid to Dun Laoghaire Harbourmaster Captain Simon Coate at his retirement party held at the National Yacht Club on Thursday evening (December 15th).

Dun Laoghaire County Council Chief executive Frank Curran joined colleagues Aidan Blighe, Director of Municipal Services and Operations Manager Tim Ryan in recognising Simon for over 30 years of service to the town as Harbour Master and Port Operations Manager.

The special gathering, which included the Coate family, had representatives from the harbour community; coastguard members, yacht clubs, watersports members and waterfront businesses. 

The Coates (from left Linda, Rachel, Simon, Céline and Jonny) at Simon's retirement party held at the National Yacht Club, Dun Laoghaire HarbourThe Coates (from left Linda, Rachel, Simon, Céline and Jonny) at Simon's retirement party held at the National Yacht Club, Dun Laoghaire Harbour

Captain Coate is handing over a bustling scene both afloat and ashore to incoming Harbourmaster Harry Duggan.

Changing of the watch - Simon Coate hands over to new Dun Laoghaire Harbourmaster Harry DugganChanging of the watch - Simon Coate hands over to new Dun Laoghaire Harbourmaster Harry Duggan (left)

As Afloat reported previously, significant changes have arrived at Dun Laoghaire Harbour this summer as the country's biggest marine leisure centre - and Ireland's largest man-made harbour -  gears up for a brighter maritime future under the new ownership of Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council.

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Dun Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council is offering an exciting opportunity for watersports providers to occupy premises in Dun Laoghaire Harbour.

The move is part of an effort by the local authority, which took control of the harbour in 2018, to grow public engagement with watersports in what’s widely renowned as a centre for sailing in Ireland.

“The ambition for this project is to provide a base/facility for public-facing watersports providers in this historical setting,” it says.

“Dún Laoghaire-Rathdown County Council is committed to encouraging and supporting the growth in sports participation generally, and specifically in watersports along the coastline and within the harbour.

“The proposal should help activate and enliven the space, bringing life and amenity to this part of the harbour,” it adds, referring to the Coal Harbour where the three self-contained off-grid container-based commercial units will be found.

Applications are due by 5pm on Friday 13 January 2023 via the eTenders website.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour RNLI hosted their first annual "Jingle Mingle" in their RNLI shop on Saturday, 26 November and brought in €2,500 for the charity. 

While raising vital funds, this event brought together and celebrated all the volunteers at Dun Laoghaire RNLI who dedicate their time to saving lives at sea.

Held in Dun Laoghaire’s Lifeboat Station and RNLI shop on the East Pier of Dun Laoghaire’s famous 200+-year-old Victorian port, the crew of volunteers invited all locals and visitors to ‘Jingle Mingle’ with them. The station was decorated with Christmas lights, and live music from the Steadfast Brass Band made sure the event was heard loud and clear!

After Christmas shopping in Dun Laoghaire’s RNLI shop, customers were invited down to the waterfront to have a hot chocolate and gingerbread person courtesy of Dun Laoghaire RNLI to say thank you for supporting the charity that saves lives at sea this Christmas. Not one to miss out on the Christmas goodies, Santa traded his sleigh for the Anna Livia, Dun Laoghaire’s all-weather Trent-class lifeboat, and greeted everyone into the station.

After Christmas shopping in Dun Laoghaire’s RNLI shop, customers were invited down to the waterfront to have a hot chocolate and gingerbread person courtesy of Dun Laoghaire RNLIAfter Christmas shopping in Dun Laoghaire’s RNLI shop, customers were invited down to the waterfront to have a hot chocolate and gingerbread person courtesy of Dun Laoghaire RNLI

The shop made four special Christmas hampers and anyone who bought something from the shop was entered into the lucky draw. The retail hamper is particularly special to the Dun Laoghaire RNLI because it harks back to a tradition between the volunteer lifeboat crew and the Kish lighthouse keepers from over 30 years ago.

Eamon O’Leary, Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s Deputy Launching Authority, remembers:

‘Before Kish Lighthouse went automatic in 1992, we decided that we would deliver the lighthouse keepers a hamper to share some of our Christmas cheer. The last time we set off into Dublin Bay, with Santa on crew, was in December 1991 on our former Waveney-class lifeboat the Lady of Lancashire. We’re delighted to see the festive spirit continue 30 years on through our shop!'

The RNLI’s shops are one way to support the charity this Christmas. Pauline McGann, RNLI Community Manager for Leinster, says:

‘The RNLI shop in Dun Laoghaire is a vital part of the coastal community because it gives us a space to raise funds for the lifeboat in an area where the RNLI has a deep and significant history in the local culture.

Just like the volunteers who have been going out to sea on the Dun Laoghaire lifeboat for 180 years, our shop volunteers are committed to saving lives at sea. They provide exemplar customer service with their extensive knowledge of the RNLI and the products we provide. From our popular charity Christmas cards to hats and clothing to jigsaws and games – we have a huge selection for the family!’

Barbara Taylor, Dun Laoghaire RNLI Shop Manager, thanks everyone who came down to support the event:

‘We are so thankful for everyone who came down to visit this weekend; in the shop we pride ourselves on our engaging interactions with our customers - we get so much from working with the public, and it means a lot to do something that we know is so meaningful for our amazing lifeboat crew.

Christmas is a special time for us here in Dun Laoghaire, and we were pleased to invite the community to come down to the Lifeboat Station to ‘Jingle Mingle’ with our volunteers! This is an event that we look forward to doing again next year.’

Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s shop is in the station on 2 Queens Road next to the East Pier. The shop opening times are: 

  • Monday 1 pm – 5 pm 
  • Tuesday 10 am – 5 pm  
  • Wednesday 10 am – 5 pm 
  • Thursday 10 am – 5 pm 
  • Friday 10 am – 5 pm  
  • Saturday 1 pm – 5 pm 
  • Sunday 1 pm – 5 pm 
Published in RNLI Lifeboats

Being a competitive sailor, I love to compete and especially love a win here and there! And so when I heard that our town had won the best town award from the Academy of Urbanism, I was delighted. We all know the amount of work that has been going on in the town, along the waterfront and everywhere in between to make Dún Laoghaire a great place to live, work and play. (See below for details on the award and judges' report)

As the current chairman of the Dún Laoghaire Business Association (DLBA) I am immensely proud of our town and of the award. I would like to take this opportunity to thank all my fellow retailers who collectively bring a wonderful retail mix to the town and to everyone who lives, works and shops in Dún Laoghaire. Without you all, we would have no town, no waterfront, and little impetus to make our town thrive.

Dun Laoghaire Harbour - The Coastal Mobility Cycle Route and Village Public Realm project, connecting urban villages, bathing places, walks and parks along the coast, played a big part in the selection process Photo: Peter Barrow/Simon CoateDun Laoghaire Harbour - The Coastal Mobility Cycle Route and Village Public Realm project, connecting urban villages, bathing places, walks and parks along the coast, played a big part in the selection process Photo: Peter Barrow/Simon Coate

The Christmas lights are on and give a great festive feel to the town. Can I encourage you all to shop local and, when shopping online, to look for the .ie sites, so shopping local and reducing those air miles? 
And the government this year have increased the amount that companies can annually gift their staff up to €1000 in Gift Vouchers. Good news for everyone. No better way to gift your team members/employees than a gift voucher from their favourite shop. And if that just so happens to be Viking Marine get your Voucher right here.

Dún Laoghaire DLRCC Cathaoirleach Mary Hanafin receives the winning town awardDún Laoghaire DLRCC Cathaoirleach Mary Hanafin receives the winning town award

The Coastal Mobility Cycle Route and Village Public Realm project, connecting urban villages, bathing places, walks and parks along the coast, played a big part in the selection process

The judges were particularly impressed with the energy in the town, the joint leadership from all key stakeholders, the inclusive nature of voluntary and business groups and the willingness to incorporate active travel, landmark buildings like the Lexicon and our natural environment into a vibrant town. The Coastal Mobility Cycle Route and Village public realm project, connecting urban villages, bathing places, walks and parks along the coast, played a big part in the selection process and in our town winning the award.

Dun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council also received a framed copy of a ‘great place’ poem that captures the essence of Dún Laoghaire, written and read by the Academy’s Poet-in-Residence Ian McMillanDun Laoghaire Rathdown County Council also received a framed copy of a ‘great place’ poem that captures the essence of Dún Laoghaire, written and read by the Academy’s Poet-in-Residence Ian McMillan

The Judges Report detailing why Dún Laoghaire won the Urbanism award makes for interesting reading.

Dun Laoghaire at night as seen from the town's East Pier lighthouseDun Laoghaire at night as seen from the town's East Pier lighthouse

Published in Viking Marine

The RNLI volunteer crew at Dun Laoghaire Harbour will feature in the new series of popular BBC Two programme Saving Lives at Sea this Thursday, October 27.

Featuring footage captured on helmet cameras, the primetime documentary series lets viewers witness rescues through the eyes of the RNLI lifesavers while meeting the people behind the pagers.

The popular 10-part documentary is now in its seventh series and includes the lifesaving work of RNLI volunteer lifeboat crews from around Ireland and the UK.

Including interviews with lifeboat crews, the series will also hear from the rescuees and their families who are here to tell the tale, thanks to the RNLI.

This forthcoming episode on BBC2 at 7pm* on Thursday, 27 October, includes Dun Laoghaire RNLI’s rescue in May 2018 when the volunteer crew launched their all-weather lifeboat on back-to-back call outs, the second of which was to assist a hen party on a motor boat that became fouled on pots.

Dun Laoghaire RNLI crew member Gary Hayes who will feature in the upcoming episode, says: ‘We are delighted to see this rescue featuring on this year’s series of Saving Lives at Sea. Our lifesaving work would not be possible without donations from the public and we are delighted to be able to share a frontline view of the rescues they support with their kind generosity.’

In 2021, RNLI lifeboats in Ireland launched 1,078 times, coming to the aid of 1,485 people, 21 of whom were lives saved. Dun Laoghaire RNLI launched their all-weather and inshore lifeboat 78 times, bringing 78 people to safety.

Published in RNLI Lifeboats

The winter lift-out of sailing cruisers was completed in Dun Laoghaire Harbour on Saturday, October 15th

Approximately sixty yachts and cruisers were hauled out of the water in perfect weather conditions as the 2022 summer season ended at Ireland's biggest boating centre.

The National Yacht Club and neighbouring Royal St. George YC lifted out approximately 30 cruisers apiece using a mobile crane on their decks.

The boats will overwinter on the hardstanding at the waterfront clubhouses, where space is at a premium.

It's not the end of all sailing by any means, however. The winter DBSC Turkey Shoot Series, which attracts up to 70 boats, mainly from the town marina, is scheduled to start on Nov 6th, and the DMYC Dinghy Frostbite Series will run in harbour racing until March already has 75 entries for its November 6th first race.

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Royal National Lifeboat Institute (RNLI) in Ireland Information

The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity to save lives at sea in the waters of UK and Ireland. Funded principally by legacies and donations, the RNLI operates a fleet of lifeboats, crewed by volunteers, based at a range of coastal and inland waters stations. Working closely with UK and Ireland Coastguards, RNLI crews are available to launch at short notice to assist people and vessels in difficulties.

RNLI was founded in 1824 and is based in Poole, Dorset. The organisation raised €210m in funds in 2019, spending €200m on lifesaving activities and water safety education. RNLI also provides a beach lifeguard service in the UK and has recently developed an International drowning prevention strategy, partnering with other organisations and governments to make drowning prevention a global priority.

Irish Lifeboat Stations

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland, with an operational base in Swords, Co Dublin. Irish RNLI crews are tasked through a paging system instigated by the Irish Coast Guard which can task a range of rescue resources depending on the nature of the emergency.

Famous Irish Lifeboat Rescues

Irish Lifeboats have participated in many rescues, perhaps the most famous of which was the rescue of the crew of the Daunt Rock lightship off Cork Harbour by the Ballycotton lifeboat in 1936. Spending almost 50 hours at sea, the lifeboat stood by the drifting lightship until the proximity to the Daunt Rock forced the coxswain to get alongside and successfully rescue the lightship's crew.

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895.

FAQs

While the number of callouts to lifeboat stations varies from year to year, Howth Lifeboat station has aggregated more 'shouts' in recent years than other stations, averaging just over 60 a year.

Stations with an offshore lifeboat have a full-time mechanic, while some have a full-time coxswain. However, most lifeboat crews are volunteers.

There are 46 lifeboat stations on the island of Ireland

32 Irish lifeboat crew have been lost in rescue missions, including the 15 crew of the Kingstown (now Dun Laoghaire) lifeboat which capsized while attempting to rescue the crew of the SS Palme on Christmas Eve 1895

In 2019, 8,941 lifeboat launches saved 342 lives across the RNLI fleet.

The Irish fleet is a mixture of inshore and all-weather (offshore) craft. The offshore lifeboats, which range from 17m to 12m in length are either moored afloat, launched down a slipway or are towed into the sea on a trailer and launched. The inshore boats are either rigid or non-rigid inflatables.

The Irish Coast Guard in the Republic of Ireland or the UK Coastguard in Northern Ireland task lifeboats when an emergency call is received, through any of the recognised systems. These include 999/112 phone calls, Mayday/PanPan calls on VHF, a signal from an emergency position indicating radio beacon (EPIRB) or distress signals.

The Irish Coast Guard is the government agency responsible for the response to, and co-ordination of, maritime accidents which require search and rescue operations. To carry out their task the Coast Guard calls on their own resources – Coast Guard units manned by volunteers and contracted helicopters, as well as "declared resources" - RNLI lifeboats and crews. While lifeboats conduct the operation, the coordination is provided by the Coast Guard.

A lifeboat coxswain (pronounced cox'n) is the skipper or master of the lifeboat.

RNLI Lifeboat crews are required to follow a particular development plan that covers a pre-agreed range of skills necessary to complete particular tasks. These skills and tasks form part of the competence-based training that is delivered both locally and at the RNLI's Lifeboat College in Poole, Dorset

 

While the RNLI is dependent on donations and legacies for funding, they also need volunteer crew and fund-raisers.

© Afloat 2020